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  #51  
Old 09-07-2016
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Ah, I see. Thinking perhaps the DPFE is beginning to malfunction?

Also, would it be the coil pack not producing hot enough of a spark?
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  #52  
Old 09-07-2016
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DPFE sensor won't affect your mileage in a bad way, there would be a CEL too.
The DPFE sensor doesn't affect your coil pack, if that's what you're asking.

The DPFE sensor measures the pressure in the EGR tube and tells the computer to open the EGR valve to let in a bit of exhaust gas through the EGR solenoid valve.
This is also based upon the engine temperatures in the combustion chamber.
I think that's right, I'm sure Ron will correct me if I'm wrong.

At any rate, the DPFE sensor is not your problem with your bad fuel mileage.

And I suppose a weak spark could attribute to poor fuel economy, but with the wide gaps these trucks run at, I just can't see that being a problem.
The spark would fail before it would become weak _ and there would be a misfire code.
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  #53  
Old 09-07-2016
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I see. Would be nice if a code would set, already. At least with a code I know what area to look at.
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  #54  
Old 09-07-2016
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If no code, then look for something mechanical that's causing the problem where there are no sensors involved.
Like a cold running engine because your thermostat isn't allowing it to come up to temperature.
The computer isn't smart enough to tell that it's running on the cool side, all it knows is that it is a little cold and it dumps more fuel in thinking that it's not up to temp. yet.
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  #55  
Old 09-07-2016
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I did replace the Tstat today, and it's now running between 192-188. However within the next couple of days it will run much hotter, between 200 and 195 as I am installing an electric fan. the temp switch comes on at 200 degrees and off again at 195. 192-188 feels a bit cold to me. Should increase performance a bit.

When the fan is installed I'll run the same test again, city and highway and post them to compare against. At that time I will still have the old wires and platinum plugs. When I get the new wires and plugs, I'll install those and take a third set of readings to compare against yet again, running the same 'course' each time with the same behavior of driving each time.

I keep thinking about those O2 sensors.....
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  #56  
Old 09-07-2016
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Could be O2 sensors.
There are so many variables involved here, you have to start with one thing and see if there is improvement. (like a simple thermostat opening too soon, and staying open)
And then the other issue that was mentioned here about having to have a factory reset of the computer when you put new O2 sensors in.

I've read that else where...
I've also read that disconnecting the battery and then connecting the positive and negative terminal together to drain the capacitors will do the same thing ???
Not to be confused with turning the headlights on for 20 minutes.

Give me a simple carbureted engine any day of the week.
Understanding how an electronic fuel injected engine works doesn't make it any easier to trouble shoot, it just makes more work.
The slightest thing out of whack and the whole thing can go to hell or in your case, like trying to find a needle in a hay stack.
It's great when it works, but when something goes wrong, it can be very difficult to trouble shoot.

If this was a carbureted engine getting bad millage, a simple turn of the idle jet would fix the problem.
Amongst other things like spark timing, thermostat, spark plugs and wires _ and that's it.
No annoying computer to fiddle with and all those codes to decipher.

My little rant...
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  #57  
Old 09-07-2016
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Yeah, I know what you mean, dude. I'll look into those later if my mileage doesn't improve with the hotter engine, copper plugs, and new wires.

What I need to do is study up on how to read all these fuel trim numbers and all this crazy crap. The info is valuable by spades, but only if you know what the numbers mean.

The irony here is I bought the Ranger because I can't afford to feed an F150, amongst other reasons. And guess what? It's drinking like it's an F150!

I love it anyway, but sheeeesh. Little by little, this thing's mileage will improve. One of these days, I'm going to ****** up a cheap little runabout gas-saver, like an Escort or a Taurus to get me back and forth to work as a daily driver while my Ranger sits all cozy waiting for some fun. Basically a reliable piece of sh**
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  #58  
Old 09-07-2016
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I think even the F150 gets better then 10mpg, probably around 15 or 17...

If I had to get something cheap on gas and easy to work on, I would get a Volkswagen Beetle, but a bit too small for me, or a Morris Mini, but still a bit small.

I had a TR7 once, but it was a mechanical nightmare, the top end of the engine was weak and the heads always warped and it was prone to overheating.
I was always working on it.

I finally sold it for 50 bucks after years of frustration and picked up my first B2200 _ and then watched the cheap reclaimed Japanese steel turn to rust _ tried everything to stop it and nothing worked.

I won't buy anything new for my daily driver, no money for it right now and the thing becomes worthless after a few years.
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  #59  
Old 09-08-2016
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Well, guys; I have something. I replaced my water pump today and now I'm getting P0118, bad coolant temp sensor. I'm looking into it, but I'm thinking that may be linked to my gas mileage.
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  #60  
Old 09-09-2016
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and you would be correct !
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  #61  
Old 09-09-2016
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I have to repeat myself but I think it needs to be said again.

3.0l Ranger should be about 17mpg average, 10mpg is a 40% drop.
If anything was causing the computer to run the engine that rich, i.e. temp, O2s, MAF, ect........, or if injector was leaking, then it would show up on the spark plug tips as blacker residue, because engine IS running Rich.
Also run finger around the inside of the tail pipe and look for blackish residue, cat can't burn it all if it is running that Rich.
But this is not the case, so the gas is not being burned

So there really are only 3 option left.
Gas is leaving the system raw, a leak or neighbor with siphon hose.
or
Something in drive train is sucking up power, trans, axles or brakes, you tested for this
or
Error in the calculation of MPG

Last edited by RonD; 09-09-2016 at 09:43 AM.
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  #62  
Old 09-09-2016
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That brings something to mind I found earlier, as well.

Coming off the intake, there's a thick, black hose. It looked a bit wet inside the intake AND it smelled of gasoline. Faintly, but still smelled of gas.

I had also run the engine without this and one vacuum line attached momentarily. Upon reconnection of these two hoses, the engine was incredibly hard to start, taking multiple attempts and absolutely reeking of gasoline in the process.
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  #63  
Old 09-09-2016
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There are not that many thick black hoses off the intake.
The one you're probably talking about goes to the EVAP system _ Canister Purge Valve.
See this post for a picture.
1999 B3000 - Slight Jerking While Driving

The other two are for the PCV and the brake booster.
The PCV valve hose isn't readily visible, it's underneath the upper intake manifold and it goes to the PCV valve on the top of the valve cover.
That leaves the EVAP hose, it's near the EGR valve.

It should not be smelling of gas and not wet with gas.
After what Ron said and the evidence of the gassy hose, I would look for an internal leak of the EVAP system.
There may not be an EVAP code because the leak (or failure if you like) is internal ???

I am also confused, you said you ran the engine with out this.
Did you plug of the port where the hose attaches into the intake manifold, if you didn't, there would be a major vacuum leak.
The truck would be almost impossible to start and if it did, it would run very rough.

A photo would be very helpful here as to what hoses were disconnected and or connected.

Last edited by Jeff R 1; 09-09-2016 at 11:41 AM.
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  #64  
Old 09-09-2016
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Yes, it is the hose near the egr. I'll take a photo when I go out there.

The engine started readily, but idled very high, refusing to come down below 1500. I didn't plug it off, although I probably should have at that time.

Once I had gotten the water pump on, it had started to rain, so I quickly filled the system with coolant, started the engine and got it into the garage, the engine running for less than three minutes. Ideal? Not by a longshot. The Vulcan is quite the engine, though.

Also, back to P0118; that was my fault. The connector was just resting on the switch, not actually connected thus the thrown code. My mistake on that one.
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  #65  
Old 09-09-2016
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The gas has to be going somewhere if your millage figures are correct.
If it was a leak in the EVAP system, there should be a code.
One would think for that amount of fuel to go missing.
You can take a photo if you wish, but I know which line you're talking about now.
A photo may benefit others though.


There is also a small "Yellow" vacuum line that operates that valve, and one other larger hose that goes back to the fuel tank.
The diagram near the rad will show you.
There is a solenoid motor that is operated my the PCM to control the valve as well on that valve.

Even a slow fuel leak would give an odor.
The puzzle continues.
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  #66  
Old 09-09-2016
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I pulled my EVAP hose off and it had a very slight (and I mean slight) odor of gas.
And not fresh gas, but the smell of old fuel and this would make sense from it sitting for 8 years with fuel in the tank.
The EVAP system still has old fuel in it.
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  #67  
Old 09-09-2016
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My Ranger was only driven in the winter until I got a hold of it. Relevancy?
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  #68  
Old 09-09-2016
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Not relevant to your millage problem.
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  #69  
Old 09-09-2016
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Alright, just got my electric fan installed. I don't believe my coolant sensor, although not throwing a code, is accurate. The fan temp switch comes on at 200F and off again at 195F. My OBDII never read higher than 192, and it kicked on at 192. Considering how cheap they are, I'm going to replace it.
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  #70  
Old 09-09-2016
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after my thermostat failed . and was towed to the dealership

i queried the mazda mechanic , he stated that the computer maintains maximum fuel economy at 199-202 degrees fahrenheit , that is what the software is programmed for

he updated my PCM software to the latest edition .

he set the "CHOKE" OFF at coolant temperature 78 degrees ( i did not know they could do that )

in the ECM software not the PCM software .

with the old style CALCIUM green coolant , you never trust coolant sensors after they have immersed in that calcium laced coolant for a while
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  #71  
Old 09-09-2016
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After what Ron said, I don't think it's a coolant issue or the engine not reaching a good running temperature.
That may be a contributor...
With 10 mpg, the spark plugs will be black and sooty, and so will the exhaust, as he said. The catalytic converters can only burn so much excess fuel.

If a huge load was being hauled or big trailer at highway speed, it may get 10mpg...
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  #72  
Old 09-09-2016
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I definitely agree. This whole thing makes no sense to me.

I'm grasping at straws here, but could compression possibly be a factor?

I mean this engine runs fantastic, or so I thought. Idles like a champ, starts every time you turn the key, and she goes pretty nicely when you open up that throttle.

One of these days, I'll hook up my scan software and look at if it's running on a closed loop or open loop during normal driving conditions. At this point, I doubt it's anything in the fuel or emissions system, but it's worth a look; gather as much info as I can.
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  #73  
Old 09-09-2016
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A low compression engine will get bad fuel economy, but that isn't the case here.
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  #74  
Old 09-09-2016
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I get the feeling where the answer will be endlessly dug for and when it's finally found it'll be a complete "well DUH" moment.
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  #75  
Old 09-09-2016
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Two other things I thought of. Could engine vacuum or fuel pressure be contributing?
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