3.0L Long cranking times....caused by??? - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


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Old 04-05-2005
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3.0L Long cranking times....caused by???

Lately my 1993 3.0L seems to crank over longer than usual during cold starts. Normal cranking time would be 2 seconds.....sometimes now it is more like 6-7. Warm starts seem okay, although if left sitting for 30-40 minutes when warm, it will sputter to life when started....almost like it is too rich. O2 sensors are about a year old. Engine is in top tune. I tried running with the MAF sensor unplugged (in failure mode) to see if the problem went away while the computer was "assuming" the MAF readings. The truck ran not the greatest with the MAF unplugged, as expected, but the hard starting did not go away. I cleaned the MAF today and reconnected it.
Once the truck is running, it's fine. Driveability is good, it's just this starting problem. Fuel system seems fine, recent filter, no noticeable vacuum leaks, PCV valve recent, non EGR truck. Ignition system is all recent (except the module), within 2 years........seems to be working perfectly.

Charging/starting systems and circuits are all in good condition. Engine cranking speed is normal.

Fuel pump & relay are working okay. Haven't pulled EEC-IV codes yet, but I'm wondering if this is a common thing with these and somebody can suggest a quick fix.

Anybody got insight as to something possibly causing this?
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Old 04-05-2005
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Sounds like it just might be your oil.

Dirty, or too heavy of a weight can cause long turn overs.

Just a thought.

Cold weather could be making the oil, thicker.












Edit: And welcome to the site.
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Old 04-05-2005
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Sometimes the fuel pump will get tired or it's check valve will fail. Either way, it will take a while for the fuel pressure to spool up when you first start it.

Try this test: key on the ignition (without starting the engine) and you can hear the pump run for 2 seconds. With a good pump this enough time to bring the fuel system up to pressure.

Then key it off and on again to let it the pump run for 2 more seconds. Repeat this ten times which should give you plenty of fuel pressure. Then try to start the engine - if it now fires up quickly, you know that you have a problem in the fuel delivery system. Since you have a newer filter, I would guess that there is something wrong in the fuel pump assembly.
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Old 04-06-2005
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Thanks for the tip. It's not the oil....I run 5/30 and it's warm out now. In fact thats when it seems to act the worst is when the weather is warmer. Good thought though.....

I pulled the KOEO and KEOR test codes last night and all I could get was 1-1-1 for all clear. So I guess thats good news.

I will try the fuel pump idea.....that could be it. I could also use a gage on the schrader valve on the rail to see whats going on.

I'll keep you posted.

Thanks
Katoom
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Old 04-06-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katoom
Thanks for the tip. It's not the oil....I run 5/30 and it's warm out now. In fact thats when it seems to act the worst is when the weather is warmer. Good thought though.....

I pulled the KOEO and KEOR test codes last night and all I could get was 1-1-1 for all clear. So I guess thats good news.

I will try the fuel pump idea.....that could be it. I could also use a gage on the schrader valve on the rail to see whats going on.

I'll keep you posted.

Thanks
Katoom
If you have access to a gauge for the Schrader, you want to see the pressure jump up to about 38~41 PSI as soon as you key it on. If is comes up slowly over a few seconds, that is why it is starting slowly.

Be careful, though! Unless the pump and check valve are completely shot, there will probably be residual fuel pressure in the lines that can spray gasoline while installing the gauge.
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Old 04-06-2005
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Welcome to the site...
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Old 04-07-2005
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I pulled the codes two nights ago.

KOEO = Hard codes = 111, stored codes = 111
KOER = KOER = 111

All clear. I was scratching my head until I read your posts regarding the fuel pump. It would seem to be the check valve. If I cycle the key 2-3 times first to build pressure it fires right up. Thanks, and good call. It is the original pump from 1993, with 242,000km.
I guess there is no point in hooking a gage up to the rail. I think I've found the problem with your help. Saved me a bunch of money too with diagnostics.

TIP. To bleed fuel pressure off of the rail easily, unplug the fuel pump relay from the power distribution box under the hood, and try to start the engine a few times. I do this when changing fuel filters. As long as your old filter isn't plugged badly, this should get most of it. Always be careful though with the potential for pressurised fuel.
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Old 04-07-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katoom
I pulled the codes two nights ago.

KOEO = Hard codes = 111, stored codes = 111
KOER = KOER = 111

All clear. I was scratching my head until I read your posts regarding the fuel pump. It would seem to be the check valve. If I cycle the key 2-3 times first to build pressure it fires right up. Thanks, and good call. It is the original pump from 1993, with 242,000km.
Could be the check valve or the pump itself. In either case, I suspect that you have to replace the entire in-tank unit anyway, so it wouldn't matter.

About your screen name - you wouldn't be a KTM guy, would you?
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Old 04-13-2005
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Well, I was cycling the fuel pump a few times at each start (long rest times beteen runs) and it was working okay. I don't seem to have to do this anymore. I think there may have been a chunk of dirt in the check valve that has passed through and is either in the fuel filter or back in the tank. All seems okay now. The pump was never noisy and seems to act okay.

As far as me being a KTM guy?!??!??!? Well we will just say that if something orange blurred past your eyes while you were out walking in the woods, it could have been me.....
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