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Old 08-24-2009
icthusrulz's Avatar
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New: Differential Guide

Here is my attempt to compile a definitive guide to differentials available for Ranger based vehicles. This initial post will be updated as I get additional information.

My goal is to get at least one review for each application of each product with both manual and automatic transmission, so I'm going to need plenty of input from everyone.

I've got things started with the stock rear open differential and the rear Lock-Right with a manual transmission. Please format reviews like these and let me know if there if there is any information that you think is lacking. All information/suggestions are welcome and encouraged.

Hope this post helps everyone's research and decision-making process, and looking forward to hearing from you

Which axles do I have?

Front
1998 - Present : Dana 35 (Modified)
1983 - 1997 : Dana 28/35 Identification


Rear
1983 - Present : Ford 7.5/8.8 Identification



Application Chart



Reviews

ARB


Air Locker
(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Air Powered Selectable (Open or Locker)
Vehicle: 2005 Ranger 4WD
Axle: Ford 8.8 (28 spline)
Engine: 4.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed Automatic
Reviewer: elementsenjoi

"I love my ARB locker. They are quite pricey, but I already had on board air so that helped. Install was pretty easy if you ask me, but not for someone without mechanical skills and a decent set of tools. Also drilling a hole in a perfectly good housing might not be to appealing to some people. It took my dad and I two half days to install it. We could have probably finished it in one day if I had the proper shims from the start.

I have my ARB in the 28spline axle and I have heard that it was discontinued more than once. Someone might be able to find one that is in stock somewhere. Even on the 28 spline 8.8 it has been very strong. I don't baby my truck in the slightest bit and it hasn't let me down yet. I have heard that the weak point in the 8.8 is the factory carrier, but the ARB is a whole new chunk so that problem is solved. There are a couple noises to be heard upon locking and unlocking. When engaging the locker, depending of what kind of position the truck is in, there most likely be a "clunk" sound from the axle. I actually like this because it lets me know without a doubt that my axle is locked. When disengaging, depending on where the solenoid air valve is located, you will hear a blow off type air release sound. I like this as well because it lets me know that it has properly disengaged.

The performance of it is awesome. The ARB has never let me down or done anything unpredictable. When locked it is 100% locked and 100% open when it is unlocked. It has three spider gears(planet gears) instead of the norm of two. This I assume is for strength because it locks one side gear and carries that through to the other side through the spiders. Actually I can usually spin both tires on flat ground even when unlocked. I was never able to do this before; perhaps the third spider gear adds just enough friction to help out with that? General, other than in mud, I can go through all of the places in 2wd locked as I can in 4wd open. I like the fact that it is selectable because there are times that having a locked rear axle can hinder performance instead of help.

I recommend the ARB Air Locker to anyone that likes to wheel hard and drive home when you are finished."

Auburn


High Performance Series
(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Limited Slip (Helical Gear)
Vehicle: 1999 Ranger 2WD
Axle: Ford 8.8 (28 spline)
Engine: 4.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed Automatic
Reviewer: seminaryranger

"In 2002, I installed the Auburn High Performance Series limited slip differential in my 1999 Ranger 4L 2wd. The axle was the Ford 8.8" 28 spline axle found in many 4L Rangers.

Coming from an open differential, the traction benefits the Auburn Limited Slip provided were astounding. My 2wd Ranger with a 3" spindle lift and 32x11.5R15 BFGoodrich Mud Terrains felt unstoppable! Making a sharp turn from stop on a wet road could get the truck sideways with ease. Appling moderate throttle from a stop with the front wheels cranked scrubbed the inside tire on pavement and noticeably chewed grass and dirt on level surfaces off road. This was even with the recommended amount of friction modifier added to the gear oil.

Make no doubts about it; the Auburn has a very high initial torque biasing ratio that Auburn claims is 3:1 for the High Performance Series.

In the snow with my 2wd truck, I found the Auburn to be a love-hate relationship. It definitely helped get the truck going in deep, unplowed snow. But in town or where there were tracks you sometimes need to follow for a while and then get out, the back end made it difficult to get out of tracks and ruts. I experienced a high tendency for the back end to push and create massive under-steer. I could usually move, but I often had a hard time moving where I wanted to go. That gets frustrating, and most of that is due to the lack of a driven front axle where the steering happens.

The Auburn limited slip is, by far, the most aggressive and tight limited slip I've ever experienced. It’s much more aggressive than the Ford OEM Traction-Loc and, likewise, more aggressive than the Eaton limited slips found some GM 10 bolt axles (not the Gov-Loc). The Auburn limited slip in my Ranger would hardly ever reach break-away torque unless the rear suspension was greatly articulated or one wheel was on ice.

The cons of the Auburn are few but pointed. The major drawback is that the unit is non-rebuildable. It will wear out.

Mine started showing signs of diminished torque biasing capacity after about 80,000 miles. Until then, it was always tight and aggressive. But as the miles increased, it rapidly weakened. I found myself using the emergency brake more often trying to transfer more torque to the articulated tire. Finally, at about 115,000 miles, it suddenly quit biasing torque all together and reverted to an open differential.

Auburn does offer a program called D-Rex which swaps out your worn out limited slip for about the price of a regular clutch plate rebuild kit. What's seriously wrong with this is that you have to pull the old carrier out, send it to the company, which then sends you a new unit. All the while, your daily driver is out of commission... and you have to pay a shop to reset your ring and pinion when the new carrier comes in. That was too much hassle and expense for me, so I just kept running the worn out Auburn until I traded in my Ranger.

Cliff's Notes: Most aggressive limited slip you can buy. Needs no wheel-spin to engage the clutches. High torque biasing ratio (~3:1). Long life span. Non-rebuildable cone clutches."
Pro Series
(Website / Application Guide)
NEED REVIEWS!!
ECTED
(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Electric Selectable ( Limited Slip (clutch) to Locker)
Vehicle: 2003 Ford Ranger 4x4
Axle: Ford 8.8 (31 spline) rear / D35 IFS
Engine: 4.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed manual
Reviewer: Ranger1

"My truck came with the stock Ford T-lok. The ECTED when turned off in L/S mode was tighter then the stock L/S. This is the only selectable locker I am aware of that is a LS when not in locker mode. When in locker mode it was really locked and really noticable in the dirt and mud. I liked it very much. The biggest plus is the LS when turned off. Also the electrical controls are a lot easier to install and less work then say an air locker. When you want a serious locker and want selectability this is an excellent choice."

"I only used it for less then a year, maybe 5K miles before truck was totaled."

Aussie Locker


(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Automatic Locker (Lunchbox Type)
Vehicle: 2005 Explorer Sport Trac
Axle: Ford 8.8 (31 spline) rear / D35 IFS hybrid front (same as 98-current ranger)
Engine: 4.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed automatic
Reviewer: brianjwilson

"The Aussie Lockers were installed front and rear of my daily driver Sport Trac. The rear first, and the front about a year later.
Aussie lockers are less expensive than the other lunchbox lockers in most cases, and the warranty is very good. I screwed the rear locker up due to install and they sent me a brand new one, with a return shipping label for the old one.

I'll start with the rear aussie locker.
Install is easy and can be done by the average backyard mechanic. The "lunchbox" locker is designed to install in the open carrier.
The design is for the locker to lock 100% under moderate to heavy throttle, and to essentially disconnect one side (the faster tire ie outside tire during a turn) to "free-wheel" under light or no throttle and while turning. It makes for a smooth seamless transition, with only a faint clicking noise while turning slowly at parking lot speeds.
During normal driving, the locker hooks up great, especially taking off from a stop. No more one-wheel-peel, it just goes. If you pull out into traffic from a side street with heavy throttle, the differential will be locked causing a bit of extra tire wear, and a tiny bit of understeer. However steering is still fine and it has minimal effect. You do learn to adjust your driving a little and pull into traffic easier and then accelerate more as you straighten up. Driving is snow/ice is much like a limited slip as there is a tendency to oversteer, but it is more predictable. I loved it, but probably wouldn't want my wife to drive it in the snow as she isn't real comfortable with counter-steering and skid control.
Off road the traction is awesome. 10x better than a limited slip and 1000x better than an open differential. It is great in sand, snow, mud, dirt, gravel, and anything else. No more annoying wheel spin like you get with an open differential. Steering is still nice and light and the locker doesn't care if both tires are on the ground or not. As long as you are on the throttle it will keep both turning. It doesn't hamper maneuverability since it unlocks as you let off the throttle.
Driving an automatic locker with a manual transmission will be more rough than an automatic. This is due to the constant locking/unlocking while accelerating and shifting.

The front locker is essential undetectable in 2wd, even with live axles. In 4x4 the steering is more tight. You have to keep a good hold on the steering wheel in 4x4 as it will want to straighten right up when you are on the throttle. The extra traction is great, just point the truck and step on the throttle. Having all 4 tires turning the same speed together is just awesome! I am typically light on the throttle when wheeling, but I kept spare CV joints and gear oil on hand just in case though I never needed them. In snow the truck wants to go straight when accelerating. But it is still manageable driving around town on snow covered roads, but much easier to coast through all turns (unless the snow is deep enough to allow plenty of slipping), or even easier in 2wd if the snow is not too slick. On the snow covered highway in 4x4 it was no problem, but I would not recommend a front aussie locker if you plan to drive on snow covered roads on a regular basis.

In summary, locker the rear before the front. The axle is stronger, the traction is better (more weight up front means the front wheels typically stay on the ground anyway), and the steering and driveability is less affected. For me, I don't like driving open differentials at all, which is what I don't like about selectable lockers. I hate open rear differentials even on the street, but a limited slip doesn't offer the same traction as a locker off road. The only downfall for me was a little extra tire wear, but the tires wore just fine and I rotated them regularly. The front locker was great but again I wouldn't recommend it if you are regularly driving on snow covered roads. Keep spare front end parts with you too."

Eaton


Detriot Locker
(Website / Application Guide)
NEED REVIEWS!!
Detroit Truetrac
(Website / Application Guide)
NEED REVIEWS!!
Posi
(Website / Application Guide)
NEED REVIEWS!!
ELocker
(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Electric Selectable (Open to Locker)
Vehicle: 2003 Ranger EDGE 4x4
Axle: Ford 8.8 (28 spline)
Engine: 3.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed manual
Reviewer: RazorsEDGE

The Eaton E-locker was installed in the rear of my formerly daily driven Ranger. I drove the ranger everyday for over 2 years with the elocker in it. The locker is completely transparent when unlocked, of course most any selectable locker is. When you push the button the locker locks up immediately and effectively spools the rearend. There is never any strange noises coming from the locker and over the time I've owned it it has been very reliable. So far, there has not been a time when the locker did not lock when it was supposed to. And as expected, it unlocks just as reliably.

This locker is perfect for any truck that is driven on the street as well as offroad. I love the fact that I don't HAVE to have the locker engaged offroad, which helps in some situations. I must say that is the downfall of my front aussie locker. There have been numerous times offroad when I would have liked to stay in 4x4 yet have the front unlocked. It would be possible if Eaton would make this unit for the d35!

In short, the E-locker is a reliable unit and can be trusted to perform as expected every time. The unit is strong and well built. And heavy as all sin too! It doesn't require air lines which could be a plus for some, maybe a negative for others. And also the unit is slightly cheaper than other comparable selectable lockers, but quality doesn't seem to be compromised. I would definitely recommend this locker to anyone.

Ford

Open
(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Open
Vehicle: ’03 Ford Ranger Edge
Axle: Ford 8.8 (28sp)
Engine: 3.0L V6
Transmission: 5sp Manual
Reviewer: icthusrulz

"You’re most likely familiar with this type, as most Rangers come factory equipped with an open differential. Pro’s: cheap, simple, transparent while driving, predictable handling. Con’s: one wheel losing traction or in the air = stuck, harder to steer with the gas pedal."
Traction-Loc L/S (Clutch)
(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Limited Slip (Clutch)
Vehicle: 2003 Ranger XLT 4wd
Axle: Ford 8.8 (28 spline) rear
Engine: 4.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed manual
Reviewer: whippersnapper02

"My truck came stock with this type of traction device. I will say that it works well for the person that will never go offroad or that will mostly stay on fire trails but it will show its dowside during moderate offroading. Why? Well anytime one of the tires comes off of the ground the diff will send all power to the tire in the air and you wont go anywhere. Also as they wear out they will start acting like open diffs on the street. So not a bad traction device and certainly better than an open diff but if you do any type of moderate offroading then skip the L/S and go directly for a locker."
Torsen T-2
(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Limited Slip (Helical Gear)
Vehicle: 2002 Ranger FX4
Axle: Ford 8.8 (31 spline) rear
Engine: 4.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed manual
Reviewer: IN2 FX4

"I have used my Torsen differential in almost every situation I can think of. I have not totally abused it but it has seen some serious off-road duty. I find it works very similar to a clutch type limit slip differential (LSD) with a few exceptions. First of all it does not wear like a clutch type and with over 100,000 miles that I have currently put on it; there has been no degradation of its performance at all. It also has a higher torque bias ratio than the standard Ford LSD.

One of the first things I noticed different about the Torsen was when taking off from a stop and turning either direction fairly sharp, it does not take much power to screech the inside tire when accelerating. It is not difficult to control it but if you are in a hurry, be prepared to make it sound like you are really on it until you start to straighten it out.

Off-road it works very well but will let you down if you are climbing a steep uneven surface like moguls that will cause one rear tire to unload most of its weight or hang in the air. It is not quite as bad as a clutch type but still bad. I find this can be helped by using the parking brake. This applies torque to the free spinning wheel causing the tire with traction to be driven. This is not an easy task with a manual transmission but I am getting better at it. I want to get a selectable locker (not available yet) for the front differential to help in situations like this.

The Torsen also seems to momentarily drive forward (or rearward) better when accelerating from a stop if one tire has little traction, compared to Ford’s standard LSD. It will still spin up one wheel but not as quickly as the standard LSD. I can’t explain why it does this but it can be very useful in a stuck situation where you are trying to rock back and forth out of it.

Overall, I think the Torsen is a top of the line LSD that excels over a clutch type LSD but will not equal the performance of a locker. The Torsen also does not have the sometimes unusual driving quirks and noise of a locker while displaying the normal driving characteristics of a standard LSD."

Quaife

A.T.B.
(Website / Application Guide)
NEED REVIEWS!!

Richmond Gear

Powertrax Lock-Right
(Website / Application Guide)
Type: Automatic Locker (Lunchbox Type)
Vehicle: ’03 Ford Ranger Edge
Axle: Ford 8.8 (28sp)
Engine: 3.0L V6
Transmission: 5sp Manual
Reviewer: icthusrulz

"I replaced my stock open differential with unit I got off ebay used for $120. It's a lunchbox type locker that installs in the stock open carrier. Took me about 4 hours to install (I took my time). This thing makes a huge difference! Off-road it really increased my 2WD Edge's capability, on road the truck's rear feels more firm, and no more getting stuck on steep wet driveways! I have much more traction in all situations, but when I do finally break a tire loose in a corner, or in rain/ice/snow, I lose traction with both tires. When traction is lost, steering is more sensitive (oversteer) but more predictable and easy to manage. Steering using the gas pedal is much easier too, as are intentional fishtails. This unit can add a little drive train play when transitioning between engine power and engine braking. This condition can cause a jolt in the drive train if the transition is abrupt enough and there is significant difference between wheel speeds (i.e. abruptly getting on/off the throttle while in a tight turn), which can causes the truck to “buck” like a horse. This is easily remedied by clutching when switching between engine power to engine braking in a corner. After about a week of driving you'll get the hang of it and forget that it's there. The only time you'll notice it is from the clicking sound you'll hear when making a turn under ~5 mph.

The only serious “misbehavior” I have ever experienced with this unit is when loosing traction in deep sand under heavy engine power the unit will begin to transfer full power to alternating sides of the axle causing the truck to shake violently. You can fix this by easing up on the gas and then gently reapplying it, but sometimes you can lose momentum and get stuck while executing this maneuver. I’ve powered through deep sand with the truck shaking the whole way before, but it turned the bearings in my u-joints to dust."
Powertrax No-Slip
(Website / Application Guide)
NEED REVIEWS!!

Torsen


T-2/T-2R
(Website / Application Guide)
NEED REVIEWS!!

Last edited by icthusrulz; 09-30-2009 at 04:50 PM.
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  #2  
Old 08-24-2009
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ARB locker for 28 spline 8.8 is discontinued.
I had aussie lockers front and rear of my sport trac, I'll write up a review later on.
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Old 08-24-2009
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This is great. I am wanting to get something to replace my open rear end and have done lots of search over lots of posts. This is great to have everything in one place. I hope people write reviews on each one. Great idea!
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Old 08-24-2009
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I'll call ARB and see if it has, thanks for the info.

Look forward to the Aussie Locker review.

Last edited by icthusrulz; 08-25-2009 at 12:05 PM.
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Old 08-24-2009
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I love my ARB locker. They are quite pricey, but I already had on board air so that helped. Install was pretty easy if you ask me, but not for someone without mechanical skills and a decent set of tools. Also drilling a hole in a perfectly good housing might not be to appealing to some people. It took my dad and I two half days to install it. We could have probably finished it in one day if I had the proper shims from the start.

I have my ARB in the 28spline axle and I have heard that it was discontinued more than once. Someone might be able to find one that is in stock somewhere. Even on the 28 spline 8.8 it has been very strong. I don't baby my truck in the slightest bit and it hasn't let me down yet. I have heard that the weak point in the 8.8 is the factory carrier, but the ARB is a whole new chunk so that problem is solved. There are a couple noises to be heard upon locking and unlocking. When engaging the locker, depending of what kind of position the truck is in, there most likely be a "clunk" sound from the axle. I actually like this because it lets me know without a doubt that my axle is locked. When disengaging, depending on where the solenoid air valve is located, you will hear a blow off type air release sound. I like this as well because it lets me know that it has properly disengaged.

The performance of it is awesome. The ARB has never let me down or done anything unpredictable. When locked it is 100% locked and 100% open when it is unlocked. It has three spider gears(planet gears) instead of the norm of two. This I assume is for strength because it locks one side gear and carries that through to the other side through the spiders. Actually I can usually spin both tires on flat ground even when unlocked. I was never able to do this before; perhaps the third spider gear adds just enough friction to help out with that? General, other than in mud, I can go through all of the places in 2wd locked as I can in 4wd open. I like the fact that it is selectable because there are times that having a locked rear axle can hinder performance instead of help.

I recommend the ARB Air Locker to anyone that likes to wheel hard and drive home when you are finished.

Last edited by elementsenjoi; 08-25-2009 at 03:53 PM.
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Old 08-24-2009
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im kinda a newbie to rangers and axles lol Im a tracked vehicle mechanic lol how do i know wich rearend my truck has? it has 4 10 gears i want somesort of locker or limited slip
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Old 08-24-2009
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--Sorry it's a little long--

Aussie locker

Vehicle: 2005 Explorer Sport Trac
Axle: Ford 8.8 (31 spline) rear / D35 IFS hybrid front (same as 98-current ranger)
Engine: 4.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed automatic

The Aussie Lockers were installed front and rear of my daily driver Sport Trac. The rear first, and the front about a year later.
Aussie lockers are less expensive than the other lunchbox lockers in most cases, and the warranty is very good. I screwed the rear locker up due to install and they sent me a brand new one, with a return shipping label for the old one.

I'll start with the rear aussie locker.
Install is easy and can be done by the average backyard mechanic. The "lunchbox" locker is designed to install in the open carrier.
The design is for the locker to lock 100% under moderate to heavy throttle, and to essentially disconnect one side (the faster tire ie outside tire during a turn) to "free-wheel" under light or no throttle and while turning. It makes for a smooth seamless transition, with only a faint clicking noise while turning slowly at parking lot speeds.
During normal driving, the locker hooks up great, especially taking off from a stop. No more one-wheel-peel, it just goes. If you pull out into traffic from a side street with heavy throttle, the differential will be locked causing a bit of extra tire wear, and a tiny bit of understeer. However steering is still fine and it has minimal effect. You do learn to adjust your driving a little and pull into traffic easier and then accelerate more as you straighten up. Driving is snow/ice is much like a limited slip as there is a tendency to oversteer, but it is more predictable. I loved it, but probably wouldn't want my wife to drive it in the snow as she isn't real comfortable with counter-steering and skid control.
Off road the traction is awesome. 10x better than a limited slip and 1000x better than an open differential. It is great in sand, snow, mud, dirt, gravel, and anything else. No more annoying wheel spin like you get with an open differential. Steering is still nice and light and the locker doesn't care if both tires are on the ground or not. As long as you are on the throttle it will keep both turning. It doesn't hamper maneuverability since it unlocks as you let off the throttle.
Driving an automatic locker with a manual transmission will be more rough than an automatic. This is due to the constant locking/unlocking while accelerating and shifting.

The front locker is essential undetectable in 2wd, even with live axles. In 4x4 the steering is more tight. You have to keep a good hold on the steering wheel in 4x4 as it will want to straighten right up when you are on the throttle. The extra traction is great, just point the truck and step on the throttle. Having all 4 tires turning the same speed together is just awesome! I am typically light on the throttle when wheeling, but I kept spare CV joints and gear oil on hand just in case though I never needed them. In snow the truck wants to go straight when accelerating. But it is still manageable driving around town on snow covered roads, but much easier to coast through all turns (unless the snow is deep enough to allow plenty of slipping), or even easier in 2wd if the snow is not too slick. On the snow covered highway in 4x4 it was no problem, but I would not recommend a front aussie locker if you plan to drive on snow covered roads on a regular basis.

In summary, locker the rear before the front. The axle is stronger, the traction is better (more weight up front means the front wheels typically stay on the ground anyway), and the steering and driveability is less affected. For me, I don't like driving open differentials at all, which is what I don't like about selectable lockers. I hate open rear differentials even on the street, but a limited slip doesn't offer the same traction as a locker off road. The only downfall for me was a little extra tire wear, but the tires wore just fine and I rotated them regularly. The front locker was great but again I wouldn't recommend it if you are regularly driving on snow covered roads. Keep spare front end parts with you too.
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Old 08-24-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spc_Austin View Post
im kinda a newbie to rangers and axles lol Im a tracked vehicle mechanic lol how do i know wich rearend my truck has? it has 4 10 gears i want somesort of locker or limited slip
2wd = 7.5" open rear end in most cases for your setup.. 8.8 is for the off-road badged vehicles


Hop under your truck adn take a lok at the badge on your axle.. its a little tag sticking out of the side of the differential locked down with one of the nuts - it should have a 7 5 on it, or an 8 8 for the type of rear you have..


chances are, yours will have a

3 73 7 5
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Old 08-25-2009
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4 10 7 5 Thanks
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Old 08-25-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WowMike2001 View Post
2wd = 7.5" open rear end in most cases for your setup.. 8.8 is for the off-road badged vehicles


Hop under your truck adn take a lok at the badge on your axle.. its a little tag sticking out of the side of the differential locked down with one of the nuts - it should have a 7 5 on it, or an 8 8 for the type of rear you have..


chances are, yours will have a

3 73 7 5
I added links to pages on axle identification in the original post.
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Old 08-25-2009
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ARB Ford 8.8 (28sp) still in production!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by brianjwilson View Post
ARB locker for 28 spline 8.8 is discontinued.
Just got off the phone with ARB to verify if it was true that they discontinued the 28 spline 8.8...

"The 28 spline Ford 8.8 is still in production, in stock, and it doesn't look like it will stop anytime soon."
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Old 08-25-2009
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Review for Ford Trac-Loc on 28 spline 8.8:

My truck came stock with this type of traction device. I will say that it works well for the person that will never go offroad or that will mostly stay on fire trails but it will show its dowside during moderate offroading. Anytime one of the tires comes off of the ground the diff will send all power to the tire in the air and you wont go anywhere. Also as they wear out they will start acting like open diffs on the street. So not a bad traction device and certainly better than an open diff but if you do any type of moderate offroading then skip the L/S and go directly for a locker.

Last edited by whippersnapper02; 08-25-2009 at 12:55 PM.
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Old 08-25-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by icthusrulz View Post
Just got off the phone with ARB to verify if it was true that they discontinued the 28 spline 8.8...

"The 28 spline Ford 8.8 is still in production, in stock, and it doesn't look like it will stop anytime soon."
Weird.
I know a lot of people who tried to order them from different people and were told it was discontinued.
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Old 08-25-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WowMike2001 View Post
2wd = 7.5" open rear end in most cases for your setup.. 8.8 is for the off-road badged vehicles


Hop under your truck adn take a lok at the badge on your axle.. its a little tag sticking out of the side of the differential locked down with one of the nuts - it should have a 7 5 on it, or an 8 8 for the type of rear you have..


chances are, yours will have a

3 73 7 5
Not always true, occasionally 2wds will have 8.8s.
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  #15  
Old 08-25-2009
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Simple way to check thanks to Trent:

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  #16  
Old 08-25-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whippersnapper02 View Post
Simple way to check thanks to Trent:

What years are these axle codes good for?
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  #17  
Old 08-25-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by icthusrulz View Post
What years are these axle codes good for?
I'm not too sure but I believe they will work for all years.
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  #18  
Old 08-25-2009
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I would review the aussie locker but Brian has done a great job already so I'll review my e-locker.

Eaton E-locker

Vehicle: 2003 Ranger EDGE 4x4
Axle: Ford 8.8 (28 spline)
Engine: 3.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed manual

The Eaton E-locker was installed in the rear of my formerly daily driven Ranger. I drove the ranger everyday for over 2 years with the elocker in it. The locker is completely transparent when unlocked, of course most any selectable locker is. When you push the button the locker locks up immediately and effectively spools the rearend. There is never any strange noises coming from the locker and over the time I've owned it it has been very reliable. So far, there has not been a time when the locker did not lock when it was supposed to. And as expected, it unlocks just as reliably.

This locker is perfect for any truck that is driven on the street as well as offroad. I love the fact that I don't HAVE to have the locker engaged offroad, which helps in some situations. I must say that is the downfall of my front aussie locker. There have been numerous times offroad when I would have liked to stay in 4x4 yet have the front unlocked. It would be possible if Eaton would make this unit for the d35!

In short, the E-locker is a reliable unit and can be trusted to perform as expected every time. The unit is strong and well built. And heavy as all sin too! It doesn't require air lines which could be a plus for some, maybe a negative for others. And also the unit is slightly cheaper than other comparable selectable lockers, but quality doesn't seem to be compromised. I would definitely recommend this locker to anyone.
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  #19  
Old 08-25-2009
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dude sweet thread def helpful

this needs to be a sticky
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  #20  
Old 08-25-2009
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This is a great post. Only problem is I still have to wait until they make an ECTED for the front differential on my Ranger.
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  #21  
Old 08-25-2009
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My review for the Auburn High-Performance Series Limited Slip Differential.

In 2002, I installed the Auburn High Performance Series limited slip differential in my 1999 Ranger 4L 2wd. The axle was the Ford 8.8" 28 spline axle found in many 4L Rangers.

Coming from an open differential, the traction benefits the Auburn Limited Slip provided were astounding. My 2wd Ranger with a 3" spindle lift and 32x11.5R15 BFGoodrich Mud Terrains felt unstoppable! Making a sharp turn from stop on a wet road could get the truck sideways with ease. Appling moderate throttle from a stop with the front wheels cranked scrubbed the inside tire on pavement and noticeably chewed grass and dirt on level surfaces off road. This was even with the recommended amount of friction modifier added to the gear oil.

Make no doubts about it; the Auburn has a very high initial torque biasing ratio that Auburn claims is 3:1 for the High Performance Series.

In the snow with my 2wd truck, I found the Auburn to be a love-hate relationship. It definitely helped get the truck going in deep, unplowed snow. But in town or where there were tracks you sometimes need to follow for a while and then get out, the back end made it difficult to get out of tracks and ruts. I experienced a high tendency for the back end to push and create massive under-steer. I could usually move, but I often had a hard time moving where I wanted to go. That gets frustrating, and most of that is due to the lack of a driven front axle where the steering happens.

The Auburn limited slip is, by far, the most aggressive and tight limited slip I've ever experienced. Itís much more aggressive than the Ford OEM Traction-Loc and, likewise, more aggressive than the Eaton limited slips found some GM 10 bolt axles (not the Gov-Loc). The Auburn limited slip in my Ranger would hardly ever reach break-away torque unless the rear suspension was greatly articulated or one wheel was on ice.

The cons of the Auburn are few but pointed. The major drawback is that the unit is non-rebuildable. It will wear out.

Mine started showing signs of diminished torque biasing capacity after about 80,000 miles. Until then, it was always tight and aggressive. But as the miles increased, it rapidly weakened. I found myself using the emergency brake more often trying to transfer more torque to the articulated tire. Finally, at about 115,000 miles, it suddenly quit biasing torque all together and reverted to an open differential.

Auburn does offer a program called D-Rex which swaps out your worn out limited slip for about the price of a regular clutch plate rebuild kit. What's seriously wrong with this is that you have to pull the old carrier out, send it to the company, which then sends you a new unit. All the while, your daily driver is out of commission... and you have to pay a shop to reset your ring and pinion when the new carrier comes in. That was too much hassle and expense for me, so I just kept running the worn out Auburn until I traded in my Ranger.

Cliff's Notes: Most aggressive limited slip you can buy. Needs no wheel-spin to engage the clutches. High torque biasing ratio (~3:1). Long life span. Non-rebuildable cone clutches.
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  #22  
Old 08-25-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seminaryranger View Post
My review for the Auburn High-Performance Series Limited Slip Differential.

In 2002, I installed the Auburn High Performance Series limited slip differential in my 1999 Ranger 4L 2wd. The axle was the Ford 8.8" 28 spline axle found in many 4L Rangers.

Coming from an open differential, the traction benefits the Auburn Limited Slip provided were astounding. My 2wd Ranger with a 3" spindle lift and 32x11.5R15 BFGoodrich Mud Terrains felt unstoppable! Making a sharp turn from stop on a wet road could get the truck sideways with ease. Appling moderate throttle from a stop with the front wheels cranked scrubbed the inside tire on pavement and noticeably chewed grass and dirt on level surfaces off road. This was even with the recommended amount of friction modifier added to the gear oil.

Make no doubts about it; the Auburn has a very high initial torque biasing ratio that Auburn claims is 3:1 for the High Performance Series.

In the snow with my 2wd truck, I found the Auburn to be a love-hate relationship. It definitely helped get the truck going in deep, unplowed snow. But in town or where there were tracks you sometimes need to follow for a while and then get out, the back end made it difficult to get out of tracks and ruts. I experienced a high tendency for the back end to push and create massive under-steer. I could usually move, but I often had a hard time moving where I wanted to go. That gets frustrating, and most of that is due to the lack of a driven front axle where the steering happens.

The Auburn limited slip is, by far, the most aggressive and tight limited slip I've ever experienced. Itís much more aggressive than the Ford OEM Traction-Loc and, likewise, more aggressive than the Eaton limited slips found some GM 10 bolt axles (not the Gov-Loc). The Auburn limited slip in my Ranger would hardly ever reach break-away torque unless the rear suspension was greatly articulated or one wheel was on ice.

The cons of the Auburn are few but pointed. The major drawback is that the unit is non-rebuildable. It will wear out.

Mine started showing signs of diminished torque biasing capacity after about 80,000 miles. Until then, it was always tight and aggressive. But as the miles increased, it rapidly weakened. I found myself using the emergency brake more often trying to transfer more torque to the articulated tire. Finally, at about 115,000 miles, it suddenly quit biasing torque all together and reverted to an open differential.

Auburn does offer a program called D-Rex which swaps out your worn out limited slip for about the price of a regular clutch plate rebuild kit. What's seriously wrong with this is that you have to pull the old carrier out, send it to the company, which then sends you a new unit. All the while, your daily driver is out of commission... and you have to pay a shop to reset your ring and pinion when the new carrier comes in. That was too much hassle and expense for me, so I just kept running the worn out Auburn until I traded in my Ranger.

Cliff's Notes: Most aggressive limited slip you can buy. Needs no wheel-spin to engage the clutches. High torque biasing ratio (~3:1). Long life span. Non-rebuildable cone clutches.
Manual or Auto Tranny?
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  #23  
Old 08-26-2009
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Auto.
Thanks for the reminder!
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  #24  
Old 08-26-2009
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I found another manufacturer, Quaife, that has a helical type L/S for the hybrid Dana 35. I've also found a guy who has one installed in his '99 Ranger. We'll see if he's willing to write up a review.
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  #25  
Old 08-27-2009
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ECTED

Vehicle: 2003 Ford Ranger 4x4
Axle: Ford 8.8 (31 spline) rear / D35 IFS
Engine: 4.0L V6
Transmission: 5 speed manual

Type: Limited Slip to Locker, electric

My truck came with the stock Ford T-lok. The ECTED when turned off in L/S mode was tighter then the stock L/S. This is the only selectable locker I am aware of that is a LS when not in locker mode. When in locker mode it was really locked and really noticable in the dirt and mud. I liked it very much. The biggest plus is the LS when turned off. Also the electrical controls are a lot easier to install and less work then say an air locker. When you want a serious locker and want selectability this is an excellent choice.
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