Why not tow with OD on? - Page 2 - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


Drivetrain Tech General discussion of drivetrain for the Ford Ranger.

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  #26  
Old 03-05-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Downey View Post
look up the weight of a cord of mixed hard wood it around 5k and i do it ever weekend
It doesn't matter if you can move it, it is way to much for a ranger. If you cannot get into 4th most of the time, than it is way overloaded. Towing is more than just moving a load. You also have to stop and steer, rather crucial things.

J/W, do you have EMS on standby? or speed dial?
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  #27  
Old 03-05-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chainfire View Post
It doesn't matter if you can move it, it is way to much for a ranger. If you cannot get into 4th most of the time, than it is way overloaded. Towing is more than just moving a load. You also have to stop and steer, rather crucial things.

J/W, do you have EMS on standby? or speed dial?

I sure hope he has some kind of brakes on the trailer.
At the very least, surge brakes.
If not, he's a friggin moron. The truck cant stop that much weight in a reasonable distance.
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  #28  
Old 03-05-2009
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its alot harder to stop i will admit but i run a load 20-30 miles to deliver it i never go over 40 and i keep alot of distance. and no i dont have breaks on the tailer
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  #29  
Old 03-05-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Downey View Post
its alot harder to stop i will admit but i run a load 20-30 miles to deliver it i never go over 40 and i keep alot of distance. and no i dont have breaks on the tailer
I dont know how the laws are over in PA, but in California, if you did that you'd get a hefty ticket. I'd recommend getting a trailer with surge brakes.
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  #30  
Old 03-05-2009
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Originally Posted by 07rangersport View Post
A cord is 4'x4'x8' how does that fill a dump truck??
Well then I guess it doesn't.

When I was a youngan, my mother would order a cord of wood in the fall. It came in a dump truck and took the rest of the day to stack....that's my only gauge of a cord of wood.

Maybe she was lieing to me the entire time!
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  #31  
Old 03-07-2009
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Originally Posted by bergs View Post
Well then I guess it doesn't.

When I was a youngan, my mother would order a cord of wood in the fall. It came in a dump truck and took the rest of the day to stack....that's my only gauge of a cord of wood.

Maybe she was lieing to me the entire time!
I dunno. LOL maybe I'm thinking of a metric cord?? I just can't see it weighing 5000#
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  #32  
Old 03-07-2009
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A cord of wood is 4X4X8.

A ranger can hold 4heightXabout4widthX6length.

I hauled firewood in my Ranger before. Hardwood. It was nowhere near 5000 pounds. The truck itself weight about 5500, and I am pretty sure it only added about 1000 to the load.

Even with a cord in a trailer, it's not going to be 5000 pounds unless the trailer is made of cast iron.

Hell, I had almost a full cord in the back of my Dodge (stacked it about 6 feet high), and it was barely sagging. It made for some dicey driving, though, and I won't ever do it again.
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  #33  
Old 03-07-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmeh View Post
A cord of wood is 4X4X8.

A ranger can hold 4heightXabout4widthX6length.

I hauled firewood in my Ranger before. Hardwood. It was nowhere near 5000 pounds. The truck itself weight about 5500, and I am pretty sure it only added about 1000 to the load.

Even with a cord in a trailer, it's not going to be 5000 pounds unless the trailer is made of cast iron.

Hell, I had almost a full cord in the back of my Dodge (stacked it about 6 feet high), and it was barely sagging. It made for some dicey driving, though, and I won't ever do it again.
Glad to know I wasn't loosing my marbles LOL.
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  #34  
Old 03-07-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SparkYZ View Post
I dont know how the laws are over in PA, but in California, if you did that you'd get a hefty ticket. I'd recommend getting a trailer with surge brakes.
Surge brake now there is a freaking joke! You have got to be kidding me recommending that kind of crap to someone.



Quote:
Originally Posted by SB05EDGE View Post
you tow with overdrive on cause the transmission would get way too hot towing a trailer with the od on.
Ok I am now confused. OD=OVERDRIVE. Can we try this one again?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark98xlt View Post
I doubt your truck could tow that much without falling apart.
Well that comment makes you what king of the AZZhole club?



Quote:
Originally Posted by rwenzing View Post
It is OK to use O/D while towing. Contrary to common forum lore, the owners manual does not prohibit it.

Whether towing or not, you have the option to turn O/D off for improved engine braking or to reduce shift hunting.

Driving with O/D off may lower transmission temperature in some conditions for two reasons. First, it may keep the torque converter clutch engaged more in 4th gear instead of disengaging frequently or continuously in 5th. Second, as mentioned before, it can reduce shift hunting with heavier loads, on uphill grades or when driving into headwinds.

Generally speaking, I would allow O/D for light towing on level ground. When the engine is working harder or when going up or downhill, O/D off can be a better choice for towing.
Best advice I've read yet.
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  #35  
Old 03-08-2009
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Yeah, we've filled all our trucks to the limit with wood and its never been anywhere near 5,000lbs. Filling the bed up should only be 1000-1500 in added weight from the wood.
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  #36  
Old 03-08-2009
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Pulpwood purchases by weight are very common and weight per cord varies widely with species and geography. A hardwood pulpwood cord generally weighs between 5,400 pounds and 6,075 pounds. A pine pulpwood cord weighs between 4,700 pounds and 5,550 pounds. You really need to determine your local average weight by species when measuring cordwood.
that info came from here

I fill my bed and a 4x8 trailer and yes it is some where around 5k. I think i would know i just towed it today.
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  #37  
Old 03-08-2009
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And the Darwin award goes to.......
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  #38  
Old 03-08-2009
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I wasn't thinking your bed AND your trailer.

Why in gods name would you do such a thing to your Ranger? That's just an accident waiting to happen.

I started thinking about it today, though, and I admit that I was wrong. Considering the bed of a Ranger holds about a 1/5 of a cord.
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  #39  
Old 03-08-2009
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a bed of a ranger is a 1/3rd of a cord stacking up a little. and i drive very slow and dont push it. its fine if you are safe when driving.
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  #40  
Old 03-08-2009
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Yea until the wheels fall off.
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  #41  
Old 03-08-2009
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how are the wheels guna fall off? lol
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  #42  
Old 03-08-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Downey View Post
a bed of a ranger is a 1/3rd of a cord stacking up a little. and i drive very slow and dont push it. its fine if you are safe when driving.
Your saying that overloading your truck is "fine if you are safe when driving"? You really scare me dude. No trailer brakes AND a loaded truck. Do me a favor and stay out of any city I may be driving in.
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  #43  
Old 03-09-2009
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Downey, with all due respect, you are bending a very dangerous envelope.

Alls it takes is that one time you blinked and a little kid is suddenly right in front of you...BAM!

Yes, I understand you are doing what you can to minimize the danger in your situation (driving slow, etc), and the great advice given so far has not made you see "the light" just yet.....so.....let's try to switch gears a bit and think about what it's going to cost in fines when you do hit that little kid with an overloaded vehicle.

You will lose alot, if not all, of your worldy posessions and all for a stupid-assed "5000 pound" cord of wood.

Having driven a truck for a couple years, I can safely say that stopping or slowing even a properly loaded truck can be a challenge at times.....never mind exceeding that capacity 2 or 3 times over.
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  #44  
Old 03-09-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Downey View Post
how are the wheels guna fall off? lol
How? Honestly?
You are towing a massive amount of weight. You are probably past the payload capacity by just having all that wood in the back, much less then towing a trailer with more.

Jesus, I am scared.

Please PM me when you are on the road. Please Please do it, then I can alert the proper athorities, maybe when your licence is revoked you might wake up.

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  #45  
Old 03-10-2009
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and how does that not fill a 250?
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  #46  
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  #47  
Old 03-10-2009
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The main problem for Downey is not using trailer brakes. The load is not that much over and is not that unreasonable for a short trip. I tow my race car in an enclosed trailer at around 3,500 lbs with another 800 lbs or so on the bed. I do this all over the country with the longest round trip at around 5,000 miles. I have also towed over the Rocky Mountains on I-70 with no problems.

I do use trailer brakes and have assist rear air springs. I can easily tow at 75 mph when the speed limit permits. Knowing how easily it tows 3,500 lbs, I would not hesitate to tow 5,000 lbs but I would drive slower and would not do it without trailer brakes.

I also do not use O/D but my transmission is a manual and O/D in a manual is not designed for towing a heavy load. I almost fried a transmission in my 89 Ranger while towing in O/D on a flat section of Interstate in AZ for less than 30 miles. Fortunately, I pulled off at a rest stop before anything serious happened to the transmission.

It will not hurt our engines to run at 3,500 rpm all day long. I try not to run it over 4,000 rpm for a long continuous period.
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  #48  
Old 03-10-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IN2 FX4 View Post
The main problem for Downey is not using trailer brakes. The load is not that much over and is not that unreasonable for a short trip.
Well seeing as how that would overload an auto ranger, I think that a manual ranger would be overloaded. With 5000# of wood plus a trailer, and 4500# of truck that is a GCW of 10000# with a trailer weighing 500#. The GCWR on my ranger is around 9000#. We aren't trying to say that a 4.0 ranger can't pull that, it obviously can, just that it is 1) Very dangerous and 2) It is bloody illegal. What about the liability in case of an accident??
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  #49  
Old 03-10-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 07rangersport View Post
Well seeing as how that would overload an auto ranger, I think that a manual ranger would be overloaded. With 5000# of wood plus a trailer, and 4500# of truck that is a GCW of 10000# with a trailer weighing 500#. The GCWR on my ranger is around 9000#. We aren't trying to say that a 4.0 ranger can't pull that, it obviously can, just that it is 1) Very dangerous and 2) It is bloody illegal. What about the liability in case of an accident??
Ford recomends only 3400 lbs I believe for a manual equiped ranger. I reguarily tow 3 full size ATV's (about 700 lbs each), 700 lb trailer, 3 guys 200 lb each, and alteast 2-300 lb of gear, which is about 3700 lbs. I tow this every weekend, without any trailer brakes, and my truck does fine, I find it does better than my buddies auto. And mine have 265's and 3.73's. It may not be the fastest around, but towing is not about speed.

The manual is rated lower because Ford realises that most people do not know how to tow properly with a manual. The do not want to replace clutches under warrenty if they do not have to.
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  #50  
Old 03-10-2009
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Can some one explain why the O/D button on the shift lever has a little trailer on it?
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