Windsheild cracked overnight in the garage - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


Exterior Semi-Tech General discussion of exterior for the Ford Ranger.
Sponsored by:
Sponsored by:

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
  #1  
Old 07-07-2010
Blhde's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 2,804
Windsheild cracked overnight in the garage

Not sure how it happened, it has been hot/humid. I have been running the air, also traveled 500 miles of the holiday weekend.

Given the placement of the cracks, it doesn't appear o be from external damage. It looks and feels like the dash pushed against it. The dash has never been out of this truck. So im at a loss.

Anyone have an opinion?








Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-07-2010
btm757's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (5)
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Norfolk / Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 3,980
Hmm im at a loss glass has done some weird stuff, the work truck last week the back glass shattered for no reason at all, But that is kinda strange, Did it get Hot/Cold and visa versa quick?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-07-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
I know rapid temp changes can crack windshields, like when you throw hot water on an icey windshield.

How hot has it been? Is the garage air conditioned?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-07-2010
Blhde's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 2,804
Garage was hot maybe around 85 with a dew point around 73, the window may have been pretty cold. I drove about 20 minutes with max ac on. I had the eatc set to maybe 65.

My ac will kick out around freezing, and the defroster does leak some air. I will get condensation on all windows and on very humid nights will need to run the wipers. Like last night.

Have had this truck since new in 99 and always run the ac when its nasty outside. Although I have just moved to new to me house with a garage I can actually use.

Im hoping this is just a random incident not any damage under the glass from rust or something.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-07-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
It sounds pretty random to me, temperature induced cracking is not common, I think you'll be ok with a new windshield
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-07-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Killafornia
Posts: 1,523
glass is a liquid so weird **** is possible
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-08-2010
Level III Supporter
iTrader: (2)
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: usa
Posts: 24,936
Rust in the windshield channel will do it being you live in a Salt state its possible.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-08-2010
buckgnarly's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: West Topsham, VT
Posts: 1,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by ES894x4 View Post
glass is a liquid so weird **** is possible

Glass is a solid, not liquid....and no, it does not flow over time.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-08-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckgnarly View Post
Glass is a solid, not liquid....and no, it does not flow over time.
Actually yes and no, glass is an amorphous solid

Find an old house with original windows, the bottom of the glass is thicker than the top, that's because over time the glass with slowly flow downward.

Look it up
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-08-2010
btm757's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (5)
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Norfolk / Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 3,980
Its proven by science son so you cant argue that it doesnt flow, well you can argue but you would be wrong. Sorry to burst your little bubble there bubble boy
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07-08-2010
Paul Spickard's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Alexander City, Alabama
Posts: 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by 01RangerEdge View Post
Actually yes and no, glass is an amorphous solid

Find an old house with original windows, the bottom of the glass is thicker than the top, that's because over time the glass with slowly flow downward.

Look it up
thats cool learn something everyday
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-08-2010
drppdyllwrngr's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (4)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: wilmington, nc
Posts: 2,096
i would run your finger nail over it and see if it's inside or out. if it's outside, i bet you picked up a rock chip at first, then the temp caused it to go. if it's on the inside, i don't know what to say.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-08-2010
Blhde's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 2,804
At the bottom edge of the window the glass is pushed outward. There is no chip. Just the crack on the outside and 2 inside.



(click on the thumbnail for a large pic it is huge)


This is the best shot I got of the damage. What you see is under the glass. So i have my concerns about rust in the channel or glass that just failed from delamination.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-08-2010
buckgnarly's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: West Topsham, VT
Posts: 1,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by 01RangerEdge View Post
Actually yes and no, glass is an amorphous solid

Find an old house with original windows, the bottom of the glass is thicker than the top, that's because over time the glass with slowly flow downward.

Look it up
No, that is due to poor manufacturing processes in the past. Show me one credible source that sites science backing up that old wives tale.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 07-08-2010
buckgnarly's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: West Topsham, VT
Posts: 1,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by btm757 View Post
Its proven by science son so you cant argue that it doesnt flow, well you can argue but you would be wrong. Sorry to burst your little bubble there bubble boy
Double negative confuses me, but please post the "scientific" info that shows glass "flows" in any resonable amount of time.....

Last edited by buckgnarly; 07-08-2010 at 11:01 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 07-08-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckgnarly View Post
No, that is due to poor manufacturing processes in the past. Show me one credible source that sites science backing up that old wives tale.
This has been proven years ago, I learned that in middle school.

Modern glass is made differently, that's why it's not an issue.

Just because you're ignorant doesn't mean it isn't true. Go read a book

Or hell just google it
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 07-08-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
It's called amorphous because glass doesn't have a rigid crystalline structure, a property of liquid. Over time at certain temperature ranges the structure can alter
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07-08-2010
buckgnarly's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: West Topsham, VT
Posts: 1,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by 01RangerEdge View Post
This has been proven years ago, I learned that in middle school.

Modern glass is made differently, that's why it's not an issue.

Just because you're ignorant doesn't mean it isn't true. Go read a book

Or hell just google it

Hell, I taught middle school and I know that is simply not true....like I said, post up a good (not Wikki or google crap) source and I am willing to learn something new. Until then, do not pass on wive's tales.....
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 07-08-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
Are you arguing that glass is not an amorphous solid?

Encyclopedia Britannica defines an amorphous solid as: "any noncrystalline solid in which the atoms and molecules are not organized in a definite lattice pattern. Such solids include glass, plastic, and gel."

noncrystalline solids do flow under certain temperature ranges or external forces
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 07-08-2010
buckgnarly's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: West Topsham, VT
Posts: 1,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by 01RangerEdge View Post
Are you arguing that glass is not an amorphous solid?

Encyclopedia Britannica defines an amorphous solid as: "any noncrystalline solid in which the atoms and molecules are not organized in a definite lattice pattern. Such solids include glass, plastic, and gel."

noncrystalline solids do flow under certain temperature ranges or external forces
No.


The "flowing" of glass causing old windows to be thicker at the bottom...that's not true.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 07-08-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckgnarly View Post
No.


The "flowing" of glass causing old windows to be thicker at the bottom...that's not true.
I understand that some old glass manufactured using glass blowing techniques does not have a universal thickness.

No not all antique windows being thicker at the bottom are caused by flow, some are just not evenly thick.

But, it is possible under the right circumstances (mainly hot temperatures) to cause the glass to shift its structure, this has been proven in lab testing.

You are right to say they're not all caused by it, but some have been.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 07-08-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
My chemistry book from my freshman year of college says that since amorphous solids (like glass) do not have a definite crystalline structure and will soften over time in a wide temperature range causing it to rearrange.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 07-08-2010
buckgnarly's Avatar
Member
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: West Topsham, VT
Posts: 1,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by 01RangerEdge View Post
My chemistry book from my freshman year of college says that since amorphous solids (like glass) do not have a definite crystalline structure and will soften over time in a wide temperature range causing it to rearrange.
But look at the time, temp, and glass types that make up windows and you will see that they are #1 not old enough (nothing man made really is), #2 not at the right temps, and #3 not made of the right stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 07-08-2010
01RangerEdge's Avatar
Scrambles the DeathDealer
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Jackson, MO
Posts: 7,598
I already said modern glass is manufactured differently and its not an issue. I know that didn't cause this guys windshield to crack.

I just wanted to state fact.

Fact: Modern glass> antique glass
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 07-09-2010
Rolldogg's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 3,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckgnarly View Post
No, that is due to poor manufacturing processes in the past. Show me one credible source that sites science backing up that old wives tale.
LOL Sorry to say, but you are wrong. Really old glass windows do get wavey and droop over many years. And I'm not talking about old houses of the 70 or 80's for all the young kiddies in here.

If you've ever been to an old church or farm house from the early 1900's with original glass, check it out.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
wont start when truck sits overnight dangerrangertremor07 2.9L & 3.0L V6 Tech 10 12-10-2008 06:25 PM
Crack in my windsheild Black 4x4 General Ford Ranger Discussion 10 03-01-2007 05:22 PM
Painted Windsheild Wipers? Diabolic Exterior Semi-Tech 27 04-03-2005 10:26 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:25 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.