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  #1  
Old 03-01-2009
ford rules's Avatar
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Tubing Questions

I was at the junk yard yesterday and was wondering if there is any way to identify what kid of tubing it was that i was looking at? Its in the yard but its really cheap only like 5 cents a pound im gonna buy quite a bit on monday and get started on my sliders and front bumper.
Thanks

Last edited by ford rules; 03-01-2009 at 10:31 AM.
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  #2  
Old 03-01-2009
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Bring a set of calipers. measure the ID and OD. If the OD is something even like 1.75, 2" or something along those lines then its most likely tube and not pipe.
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Old 03-01-2009
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calipers are the way to go. new tubing will usually come with some lettering on the outside letting you know what it is. If it's rubbed off, you just gotta measure to be sure.

make sure you actually are using tubing and not pipe for sliders also.
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  #4  
Old 03-01-2009
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to a non metal knower, whats the difference?
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  #5  
Old 03-02-2009
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Originally Posted by monkeysteeler12 View Post
to a non metal knower, whats the difference?
as far as dimensions go, tubing is measured with nice even numbers. So a tube callout can be 1" x 0.065" and when you go to measure it, the outer diameter will be 1 inch and the wall thickness will be 0.065 inches. A pipe callout will be something like Schedule 40 with a nominal diameter of 4". And from that you can look up a chart and the outer diameter will measure something like 4.1 inches and the inner will be another dimension. Pipe dimensions are built to standards based on the classification (schedule 40, etc)

The difference between tubing and pipe itself, though, is in the intended usage. Tubing is constructed to be structural. Meaning that tubing is able to withstand tension and compression loading as well as bending. Bicycle frames, civil trusses, roll cages are all examples of things that need to be built with tube. Pipe is meant to withstand internal pressure. Plumbing systems and oil lines are examples where pipe is the preferred material.
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Old 03-02-2009
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Originally Posted by Drayke View Post
as far as dimensions go, tubing is measured with nice even numbers. So a tube callout can be 1" x 0.065" and when you go to measure it, the outer diameter will be 1 inch and the wall thickness will be 0.065 inches. A pipe callout will be something like Schedule 40 with a nominal diameter of 4". And from that you can look up a chart and the outer diameter will measure something like 4.1 inches and the inner will be another dimension. Pipe dimensions are built to standards based on the classification (schedule 40, etc)

The difference between tubing and pipe itself, though, is in the intended usage. Tubing is constructed to be structural. Meaning that tubing is able to withstand tension and compression loading as well as bending. Bicycle frames, civil trusses, roll cages are all examples of things that need to be built with tube. Pipe is meant to withstand internal pressure. Plumbing systems and oil lines are examples where pipe is the preferred material.
Very well put!
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Old 03-02-2009
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Originally Posted by Drayke View Post
as far as dimensions go, tubing is measured with nice even numbers. So a tube callout can be 1" x 0.065" and when you go to measure it, the outer diameter will be 1 inch and the wall thickness will be 0.065 inches. A pipe callout will be something like Schedule 40 with a nominal diameter of 4". And from that you can look up a chart and the outer diameter will measure something like 4.1 inches and the inner will be another dimension. Pipe dimensions are built to standards based on the classification (schedule 40, etc)

The difference between tubing and pipe itself, though, is in the intended usage. Tubing is constructed to be structural. Meaning that tubing is able to withstand tension and compression loading as well as bending. Bicycle frames, civil trusses, roll cages are all examples of things that need to be built with tube. Pipe is meant to withstand internal pressure. Plumbing systems and oil lines are examples where pipe is the preferred material.
Someone needs to sticky this. It would answer alot of questions. Well put lol.
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  #8  
Old 03-02-2009
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I got 105' of tube for 60 bucks. There are 5 pieces that are 3/16'' and one 1/4 '' wall i thought it was a good price so i went ahead and got it sliders and bumpers here we come!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 03-02-2009
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how are you going to bend that? that is super heavy wall.
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Old 03-02-2009
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^^ pure muscle
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  #11  
Old 03-02-2009
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Havent figured that out yet ill call pro tools tomorrow and also that jd-2 company and see what they say. What is the thickness of 3/16" in decimal this is the die that pro tools lists
http://www.pro-tools.com/105tdies.htm
.134 is thicker than 1/4 which is .125 correct
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Old 03-02-2009
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.25 is 1/4"

.1875 is 3/16"

.125 is 1/8"
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Old 03-02-2009
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Well chit oh well i geuss ill make my sliders out of it and my radius arms out of the .25 stuff and then just keep the rest around i may have to buy some newer stuff for the bumper than but its not really a big deal to me it was cheap enough.that .25 would be around $300 new for a 22 ' piece
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  #14  
Old 03-02-2009
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There are a couple of guys who have bent .25 wall tubing in the 105HD. There are also some people who have bent the arms on their benders trying.
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Old 03-02-2009
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holy crap! idk how he bent it. if he really did.
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Old 03-02-2009
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well im gonna call tomorrow and then i will go from there but like i said they will work for sliders still maybe it will bend it .
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Old 03-02-2009
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now i get it..... thanks
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Old 03-02-2009
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Originally Posted by ford rules View Post
well im gonna call tomorrow and then i will go from there but like i said they will work for sliders still maybe it will bend it .
You could always grind out a die on a cheapo harbor freight bender made for pipe, to do small bends in the .25 tube.
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  #19  
Old 03-02-2009
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Thats what i was thinking to but for my bumper im gonna need to do about a 90* for my stinger and the old HF just aint gonna cut it
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Old 03-02-2009
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90 degree??? mine is like 145-160
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  #21  
Old 03-02-2009
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I figured it was prollay more than 90 but ill probably get some 1.75 OD tube for the bumper .125 wall so that should work for that but ya im all set to extend my radius arms and i will use .25 for the slider mounts and the .1875 for the long tubes.
Beard you did use 2"x.25 wall tube for rangererv radius arms correct
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Old 03-02-2009
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yes i did.
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  #23  
Old 03-03-2009
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Okay i got the caliper out today and the tube measures .140" wall. Well pro tools said that there bender wont be able to bend it but he said that it is very strong steel its 1018 what ever that means.

Last edited by ford rules; 03-03-2009 at 02:32 PM.
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  #24  
Old 03-03-2009
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Future reference:

Tubing is measured my OD

Piping is measured by ID

I believe that 1018 is the grade steel it is, which is yes, pretty strong. lol
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  #25  
Old 03-03-2009
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Originally Posted by ford rules View Post
Okay i got the caliper out today and the tube measures .140" wall. Well pro tools said that there bender wont be able to bend it but he said that it is very strong steel its 1018 what ever that means.
They say that to cover them selves, because they wont cover any breakage if you bend anything over the recommended wall thickness. the difference between .120 and .140 isnt alot at all.
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