Driving a 2wd pickup in snow? - Page 2 - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


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  #26  
Old 08-23-2007
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I've had many 2 wheel drive trucks that did just fine with regular radials. A little weight in the back helps, but not mandatory. The rear end might swerve a little but that's about it.
I'm also in the Northeast Ohio area and have been driving in the snow for 30 + years. I have yet to buy any snow tires.
Now if you want a truck to plow snow, that's a different story, you'll need weight in the back, snow tires, and 4 wheel drive, although it can be done with 2 wheel drive vehicles.

You also have to remember there's only a few days a year around here that are really bad, and most of the time the roads get plowed and salted right away. So you have to determine what's best for you.
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  #27  
Old 08-23-2007
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I've plowed snow the past 3 years and have to drive in on the unplowed roads 30 miles to get to work. I've always done this with my little 2wd with an open diff and have never got it stuck in the snow. It all depends how u drive it imo. You just have to be smart and think ahead.
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  #28  
Old 08-23-2007
tyoma71
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I have never driven 4WD, so let me just say that first. I won't be able to make any comparisons for you.

I actually first got my license in February, and I was learning how to drive in January. So when I was very first learning how to drive a car, I was doing it in snow and ice. Sounds like a real bummer, huh?

Well, the end result of that is that to this day I still get nervous about parking under any circumstances, but I'm not the slightest bit concerned about driving in snow or ice (aside from how other drivers will act around me).

There's really not much to it in my opinion, and I don't put much weight in the back. I have a spare tire and a light box, but I also don't scoop any snow out that falls in there. Snow can weigh quite a bit.

I would just suggest being slow with the gas and braking earlier than you normally would. I have a pretty light foot and like to drive with a good bit of distance between myself and the vehicle in front of me, so my normal driving style is rather suited for inclimate weather.

"Just take it easy" is my advice. It might feel like you're going at a snail's pace driving so cautiously and accelerating so slowly (and braking so early), but you'll get home a lot faster than if you spin out and get into an accident - I can assure you of that.
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  #29  
Old 08-23-2007
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4wd is nice but I have no desire to have it its just more **** to go wrong and fix when it does break and more **** to maintain.

I went through 14 inches of snow dropped 5/6 in my 2wd truck with sandbags in the back. My frame rails are roughly 5 inches off the ground its the driver.
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  #30  
Old 08-23-2007
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I drove a 2wd with open diff. and a little weight for two winters and I had no problem. just know how your vehicle handles and what the limits are.
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  #31  
Old 08-23-2007
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4WD makes me invincible. I do donuts going 70 down the highway while drinking sparkz alcoholic energy drinks and grabbing my crotch listening to the super awesome Limp Bizkit.


And nobody can disagree because I'm right and stuff..
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  #32  
Old 08-24-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Ak_Ranger
4WD makes me invincible. I do donuts going 70 down the highway while drinking sparkz alcoholic energy drinks and grabbing my crotch listening to the super awesome Limp Bizkit.


And nobody can disagree because I'm right and stuff..

INCONCEIVABLE!
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  #33  
Old 08-24-2007
D.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Ak_Ranger
4WD makes me invincible. I do donuts going 70 down the highway while drinking sparkz alcoholic energy drinks and grabbing my crotch listening to the super awesome Limp Bizkit.


And nobody can disagree because I'm right and stuff..
And to think your the future of this nation. Such thoughts are so sad, their worth laughing at the source.
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  #34  
Old 08-24-2007
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in low snow, 2wd is fine w' a good driver

in heavy snow, it sucks when you get STUCK

here's a thread w' pic of how ridiculous 2wd CAN be:

https://www.ranger-forums.com/forum2...ad.php?t=39122

and here's all the prep I did for my 2wd winter setup:

https://www.ranger-forums.com/forum2...ad.php?t=32827
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  #35  
Old 08-24-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D.
And to think your the future of this nation. Such thoughts are so sad, their worth laughing at the source.


its people like that, that the EMT's are scraping up at 3 in the morning

i've driven in snow a few times up here in my 2WD... the first time wasn't too bad, i was actually able to do the speed limit, but this last time, it was soo cold, and raining a couple days beforehand, that when the snow showed up here, there was already ice down on the road, and add 6" of snow, it made going to work real fun... took me 30 mins to go 3 miles to work... this winter i'm coming prepared, i'm gonna pick up one of thoes bladders that you put in the bed of your truck that you can fill with water, and i just picked up a set of 15" deer print rims, and studded tires
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  #36  
Old 08-24-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by D.
I've driven 2wd vehicals in snow for 20+ years. Not much to consider about the vehicals, but the DRIVERS with each tend to make more mistakes.

People believe if they have a 4wd they are better off.. NOT true. Knowing *how to drive* in snow is the key issue and makes the biggest difference.

Exactly!! It's not the vehicle, it's the driver. If there's some young folks out there that this will be their first winter driving in the snow.......take a winter driving course. Even a defensive driving course is good for the young'ns to take.
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  #37  
Old 08-24-2007
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My truck may be 4wd but it's 2 wheel steer and 4 wheel brake just like everybody elses's. I only use my 4wd as a self extraction (which I've done...) or for pulling stuff out or around. Never really used it to just drive, never needed to. Just practice and get a feel for how it handles.
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  #38  
Old 08-24-2007
D.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolldogg
Exactly!! It's not the vehicle, it's the driver. If there's some young folks out there that this will be their first winter driving in the snow.......take a winter driving course. Even a defensive driving course is good for the young'ns to take.

Damn.. Me and a Canadian agreeing on something. Must be a ' truthful conspiracy '
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  #39  
Old 08-24-2007
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BUT 4wd does help


ill agree it has a LOT to do with the driver though
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  #40  
Old 08-24-2007
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Hi

I live in Nova Scotia, on the east coast of Canada. Wintertime here usually brings nasty storms on a fairly regular basis, and the ground is covered in snow most years from late Oct/early Nov. till at least March, sometimes April or May. Last year my winter beater was a 94 Crown Vic with pretty much bald tires.
I also drove an 2wd s10 and a chevy 1500 2wd since I was 16.

Driving in the snow safely in a 2wd truck requires a couple of things...:

1) extra space. know your vehicles braking and acceleration so you always have the necessary room to stop, and won't pull out into traffic without the room to do so safely.

2) good winter specific tires, preferably narrow and studded. (I had a 93 Golf with 185/55 13s on it, tigerpaws with studs. amazing that car would climb unplowed lake access roads)

3) you must realize that steering and braking are seperate things in low traction conditions. Also a knowledge of how to steer by "drifting" (not as popular in Japan as NS in winter.) Don't be afraid to hang the *** end out, but become comfortable with it in seclusion before trying it in traffic.

4) Here blowing snow and slushy buildup cause horrible visibility. You must be able to drive from memory and not panic because you can't see. (another point here is good wiper blades and winter specific washer fluid.) (and a ice scraper with a squeegee inside! if you ever find out why you'll be glad.)

5) be gentle. Even a corolla can make rooster tails in snow. The tire gets most traction just before it loses it completely (spinning / sliding) so think about "threshold braking" and apply it to "threshold acceleration". And remember that if the road is going faster than your tire, you can't steer.

6) Something from motorcycling: escape routes. Always think about what you will do if you can't stop in time for the red light, line of traffic, nun with baby carriage in crosswalk. Planning ahead means you're free to use what little time you have to react instead of panicking and locking up the brakes because you weren't ready.

The biggest thing to remember is that everyone re-learns winter driving every year. The 1st storm or 2 is most dangerous, no one is used to minimal traction and most wait until the last min for snow tires. Don't be a victim of stupidity, leave yourself plenty of room to give yourself time to react and make decisions.

I've driven as a job for almost 5 years, numerous cars each day, over many many thousands of km's of icy, unplowed, no visions roads. Never bent any sheetmetal and I've watched 100s go off roading unintentionally. When it's -40c you don't want to be hitchhiking.
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  #41  
Old 08-24-2007
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thats why i live in TX
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  #42  
Old 08-25-2007
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I just throw some weight in the bed and knowing how to drive in it makes all the difference in the world.
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  #43  
Old 08-25-2007
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wow...a lot more people than I expected have no problem w' 2wd and snow

questions for you people:

1.) how deep is the snow?

2.) do you have to drive up long hills?

3.) do you do this with an automatic transmission?
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  #44  
Old 08-25-2007
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My '84 2WD 5-spd goes out every snow storm in hill country. Four good snow tires are the biggest asset. Some weight and a shovel are essential for the deep snow we get.

The closest you could get to 4WD traction would be four narrow studded snow tires. Here in Québec they're legal from Nov-April.
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  #45  
Old 08-25-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bhavesh
wow...a lot more people than I expected have no problem w' 2wd and snow

questions for you people:

1.) how deep is the snow?

2.) do you have to drive up long hills?

3.) do you do this with an automatic transmission?
**********************************

1. Doesn't matter, the roads are usually plowed right away anyhow, worst case scenario is maybe 2-6" on the roads, and then the rear end might swerve a little on take off's, but usually straightens out right away as long as you're not gunning it. Take it slow and easy and usually I have no problem. When driving on snow and ice, speed is your enemy. Go slow and stay in control. Go too fast and if you have to make a quick stop, you might lose control, so you have to take it easy on snow and ice.

2. Occasionally, but they are usually salted right away, so it's not really a problem.

3. Automatic or stick, doesn't much matter, but with the trucks I've had it's usually automatic.

Here's a list of some of the trucks I've had over the years.

*****'s 4wd Jeep wagon
CJ5 4wd( or was it a CJ7 ?? I don't remember)
1964 Ford Econoline Van
1975 Chevy 1/2 ton 2wd
1976 Chevy Van
1978 Chevy Luv Truck 2wd
1997 Chevy S-10 2wd
1978 Chevy Silverado 1500 2wd
2003 Ranger 2wd

Years ago I used to do snow plowing with the 4 wheel drives, but I don't do that anymore. I don't do off-road driving, and there's just not enough snow around here for me to justify a 4wd vehicle. I'm more concerned about getting good mpg, than trecking thru mud and snow.

If you don't believe me, then think for a second, how many cars are 2wd, and how do they manage to get around all winter ??


*

Last edited by dj wayne; 08-25-2007 at 11:56 PM.
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  #46  
Old 08-25-2007
04 EDGE
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i used to drive my 2wd in the snow.this winter will be differant.
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  #47  
Old 08-25-2007
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My plan is to get 6-50 lbs bags of softner salt from Costco, because I can return them in the spring "No Questions Asked." :-)

Would there be any possibility of the salt corroding the bed? It would be under my bed cover.

Ahhh...you gotta love Costco...And working there.
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  #48  
Old 08-26-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtslmn720
ive had my truck for 2 winters now and i know how my 2wd LS will respond... it just takes some getting used to and knowing how much gas and brakes so use to keep from spinning or sliding
x2 -Mike-
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  #49  
Old 08-26-2007
D.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bhavesh
wow...a lot more people than I expected have no problem w' 2wd and snow

questions for you people:

1.) how deep is the snow?

2.) do you have to drive up long hills?

3.) do you do this with an automatic transmission?
How deep is the snow?
http://www.djaye.com/IMG_2704.JPG

Thats my truck in the picture. I stopped as I didn't want to break off my vailience. There were too many trees and powerlines down. It was 71degrees earlier in the day ( was Oct 10, 2006, came out of Nowhere! ).

Its all about the tires and the drivers ability.

I have a Manual Transmission.

Hills? Not really a problem, again, its all about whatever tires you have.
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