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  #1  
Old 08-04-2009
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prepairing for winter driving

sorry to bring this up in the middle of summer, but i was wondering what the guys on here did to make their 2 wheel drive trucks get around in the snow better?
i wish i could get a new 4x4 but i just can't swing the payments right now so i'm forced to do the 2 wheel thing for awhile.
i'm looking for things that have been proved to work. i will be running 29-9.50-15 bfg all terains if i can get my lift spindles in before long and the 4x4 blocks in the back. i run on some nasty unplowed roads in the middle of the night for the local firedept and need some ideas i can get done before it's freezing outside. thanks in advance for any help.
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Old 08-04-2009
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Sand bags over the wheels.
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Old 08-04-2009
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locker ftw
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Old 08-04-2009
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Locked with chains and sand bags will get you through alot.
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Old 08-04-2009
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its august?
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Old 08-04-2009
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At least try to upgrade to a L/S. I put concrete blocks in the back. I know everyone is gonna bash me for it but I dont care.
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Old 08-04-2009
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Originally Posted by mossyoak03 View Post
its august?
i just don't want to be laying in the snow working on the locker idea when it's 40* outside when i can be inside on the computer keeping warm was my thought?
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Old 08-04-2009
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i just don't want to be laying in the snow working on the locker idea when it's 40* outside when i can be inside on the computer keeping warm was my thought?
most ppls trucks go under the knife in winter. but listen to the guys that posted useful information.
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Old 08-04-2009
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lmao, yes it is weird to see this in August.

A locker will absolutely help get you through deep snow. But you need to be comfortable with oversteer and 'drifting' to make it work well in a 2wd.
Anyway, a good LS or locker will help push through snow. Typically a tall skinny tire will also make is easier to push through. Weight over the rear end (secured), siped/studded tires, chains and lower air pressure all help.
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Old 08-04-2009
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Tires helped me the most
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  #11  
Old 08-04-2009
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Originally Posted by mossyoak03 View Post
most ppls trucks go under the knife in winter. but listen to the guys that posted useful information.
since i don't have a garage i'm forced to do this type of stuff now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianjwilson View Post
lmao, yes it is weird to see this in August.

A locker will absolutely help get you through deep snow. But you need to be comfortable with oversteer and 'drifting' to make it work well in a 2wd.
Anyway, a good LS or locker will help push through snow. Typically a tall skinny tire will also make is easier to push through. Weight over the rear end (secured), siped/studded tires, chains and lower air pressure all help.
your saying a tall skinny tire. would you say those 29-9.50-15 would be a little big for snow ?
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Old 08-15-2009
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I'll help you out in November......until then, NO TALKIN' SNOW!!!
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Old 08-15-2009
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i just went out in the snow with my 2wd with and open diff, just plowed through snow ***** with the valence and crossmember, but that wasnt a lot of snow, it was before i had a camper top so i left the snow in the bed and put about 6 or 7 cinderblocks in the back
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Old 08-15-2009
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I'll help you out in November......until then, NO TALKIN' SNOW!!!
Didnt winter just end here in Canada like 2 weeks ago?
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Old 08-15-2009
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Its going to be funny to say it, but of all the 2wd trucks I've driven in the winter, the lower they were the better traction they had. Stock height and higher just didn't have enough traction and made the rear end bounce all over the place and also made losing control easier on uneven or slippery surfaces.


However, lowering your Ranger isn't in your game plan, so some proper SNOW tires, not M+S rated, not MTs or ATs...real SNOW tires will make all the difference. Yes, a locking diff will help alot as will weight over your axle, but as others have said, tire choice is absolutely crucial to your success. Also being able to control your vehicle in a slide or spin is important too.

As you may have read in one of the other member's sigs here, they have a quote from me that says "well...it's 2wd so...you'll probably die."
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  #16  
Old 08-15-2009
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BFG AT's are a pretty decent tire for snow. That's what I used to run when I had my 2wd and they did pretty good. However, if you have to deal with a lot of icy conditions, then you should look into proper winter tires.
Some extra weight in the back and an LS or locker will help a lot too.
I would use bags of sand or gravel for weight, that way if you do get stuck, you can throw the sand under the tires for traction.
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Old 08-15-2009
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I had Cooper Discoverer STTs, which were an M+S rated tire. They were great in mud, but because they were a hard compound, didn't do that well in snow and ice unless the air pressure was way down.
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  #18  
Old 08-15-2009
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Originally Posted by crazymikey View Post
Didnt winter just end here in Canada like 2 weeks ago?
LOL, maybe in Alberta.....

You poor bastards got hit with snowstorms while we were basking in the sun and warmth in Eastern Ontario. You've had your share of nice spring weather while we freeze over here....payback!! LOL
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  #19  
Old 08-15-2009
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go drift in a parking lot and learn how the truck reacts and learn how to counter steer, that and some sand bags in the back and you'll be fine
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  #20  
Old 08-15-2009
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Driving a 2wd truck down unplowed roads, alone at night is asking for trouble. You're most likely to need rescue as opposed to doing any rescuing.

Get some nice wool socks and blankets to keep in back!
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  #21  
Old 08-15-2009
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Since it hasnt been mentioned yet:


Supplies you should always carry during the winter... get yourself a little canvas bag, or somethign waterproof you can put small items in:

*A lighter and/or Matches
*several Taper Candles.. those cheap white 50 cent candles
*A blanket of some sort.. I have 2 shipping blankets in my crossbed box.
*2 Lengths of Tow Rope + Tow Chains - Chains to wrap around bumpers/axles, or wherever you cant get the rope.. and slide the rope through it to pull on in case of stuckage.
*3 or 4 big sandbags in the bed should do the trick.. got the long tube ones - little ones slide around too much.
WARNING: Small weights in the back is DANGEROUS during winter!! You take a corner a little too steep.. all that weight will shift in the bed and literally throw that rear end across the road, losing traction.
*A pair of rubber boots so you dont have to soak your feet if you need to get out for any reason to get unstuck
*Small shovel/folding shovel


There are probably a few thigns I havent mentioned.. but jsut play safe - start slow, start stopping a good 300 feet earlier then you normally would - if you are driving downhill don't use the brakes if you can help it - just downshift into 2 or 1 (Automatic) or pop it into second or first for a manual.


Just play safe - teh more winters you drive.. the better off you'll be through experience.. I very visibly remember driving sideways up the hill to work at a crazy angle waving to the plow coming down as I had the gas smashed slowly inching my way up the hill. Old 2wd 88' ranger I still have out back here.



Tires help as well, as mentioned above - get at least a rear set of studded/siped tires for traction and stopping.. a full set woudl be applicable - and if needed.. a set of good tire chains works fantastic too.
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  #22  
Old 08-15-2009
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I have snow tires on my Diesel, and they haven't let me down, that's for sure.
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  #23  
Old 08-15-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightredford View Post
BFG AT's are a pretty decent tire for snow. That's what I used to run when I had my 2wd and they did pretty good. However, if you have to deal with a lot of icy conditions, then you should look into proper winter tires.
Some extra weight in the back and an LS or locker will help a lot too.
I would use bags of sand or gravel for weight, that way if you do get stuck, you can throw the sand under the tires for traction.


haha your joking right???

well to the creator of this thread- i run a 4x4 ranger, but i used to run an 87 dodge dakota, 2wd 3.9L v6.. hell i put two 24"x30" concrete slabs in the bed of my ranger and it didnt do ****...


so like other's have said, find something heavy, either it be sandbags, cement blocks., snow etc and know how to get around in the snow with a 2wd.. i live 20kms for town and they dont plow our road worth the **** and most times i have my tuck in 4wd because i cant go anywhere and there's often 6-12 inches of snow on the road..

also if you dont know how to fishtail or whatever in the snow, then wait till it snows then go into an empty parking lot and practice your understeering, oversteering(fishtailling), sliding etc it helps a ton!!! and yeah.....lol
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  #24  
Old 08-15-2009
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Originally Posted by ns_red7 View Post
Driving a 2wd truck down unplowed roads, alone at night is asking for trouble. You're most likely to need rescue as opposed to doing any rescuing.

Get some nice wool socks and blankets to keep in back!
no **** your talking to a 40 year old that has had a commerical driver's license since he was 18. i was looking for proven ideas that work not the same old crap that don't work i guess what i need is a big duramax 4x4?
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  #25  
Old 08-15-2009
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Originally Posted by Rolldogg View Post
LOL, maybe in Alberta.....

You poor bastards got hit with snowstorms while we were basking in the sun and warmth in Eastern Ontario. You've had your share of nice spring weather while we freeze over here....payback!! LOL
Actually, I've only been out here since May 30 and the weather has been incredible. A little more rain than usual, but it's been hot and sunny for the most part. But then I do also live in Lethbridge which is noted to be the sunniest city in Canada.
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