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  #26  
Old 11-08-2004
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The only thing I add to the truck for winter is a scraper. I keep my wheeling gear in the truck year round so there's always a shovel, hi-lift, straps, shackles, winch, first aid kit, fire extinguisher, second battery, CB, etc. in the truck somewhere.

Adding weight is good if your concern is traction but with a 4x4 and a little skill, there's little need for it. When driving in the snow I'm more concerned with getting stuck in which case the extra weight actually hinders the recovery.

If you are going to add weight, look in your owner's manual for the proper way to load your vehicle. I believe the proper location is above the rear axle according to the manual. There are many arguments for and against putting weight against the tailgate, but there is no good reason anyone has ever given to NOT put the weight directly between the wheel humps. There should be places fore and aft of the wheel humps for a 2x4 to keep the weight from moving around.

My suggestion to everyone expecting snow this winter is to make sure your vehicle maintenance is up to date before the snow arrives. Washer fluid of any type is better than none at all and around here it doubles in price once the bad weather starts. Check the maintenance schedule in your owner's manual for the coolant change interval and if you're due for it, have it done. Carry extra clothes in case you do get stuck or your vehicle is disabled. The only thing worse than waiting for a tow truck is waiting for a tow truck in the middle of winter in wet clothes.
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  #27  
Old 11-08-2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FireRanger
a can of that spray deicer
Dosn't you drink get hot then?
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  #28  
Old 11-08-2004
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I doubt that putting the bags right over the drive axle vs against the tailgate makes enough of a significant difference either way. I for one have an H-bracket made from 2x4s that fits around the wheel wells. It keeps the sand bags in the middle, over the axle and leaves room against the tailgate for mah groceries! I think it's key to secure the bags either way. A good solid jolt might enough to get them sliding, especially on one of those hard plastic drop in liners like Ford dealers like to dealer-install (I had one in my '99). The stored momentum in a few hudred pounds of sand sliding across a plastic liner could cause problems in my view..
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  #29  
Old 11-08-2004
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I would rather be able to stop than go. Adding weight to the truck makes it take you longer to stop too you know.
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  #30  
Old 11-08-2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHBubba
I doubt that putting the bags right over the drive axle vs against the tailgate makes enough of a significant difference either way.
Ever sit in the last seat on the school bus?? That's the best seat because every time the bus hits a bump, the poeple in the last seats get catapulted towards the ceiling. Same thing when loading weight at the tailgate of a pickup.
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  #31  
Old 11-08-2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave and Julie
I would rather be able to stop than go. Adding weight to the truck makes it take you longer to stop too you know.
Adding 200-250 lbs. of sandbags is the same as carrying a passenger of that weight. Its not a significant weight gain vis-a-vis stopping. And, the added traction on the rear wheels caused by the sandbags will add more traction for purposes of stopping on ice and hardpacked snow and thereby assist in stopping (as well as assist in traction when going), which will offset the minimal increase in stopping distance caused by the weight increase.

Anyone who's driven a rear wheel drive pickup (or a 4WD with only the rear wheels driving) in the same hardpacked snow or loose snow conditions with and without sandbags in the back, especially up or down hill and especially with the sandbags right in front of the tailgate, knows that there's a huge increase in traction with the sandbags, if you use enough of them, which in my opinion is 200-250 lbs for a Ranger and 300-350 lbs for a full-size pickup.
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  #32  
Old 11-08-2004
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I'm with John -- that's the "magic" weight as well in my experience.
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  #33  
Old 11-08-2004
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AND - you can break open one of the sand bags and use the contents for traction too....
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  #34  
Old 11-08-2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBarCYa
Ever sit in the last seat on the school bus?? That's the best seat because every time the bus hits a bump, the poeple in the last seats get catapulted towards the ceiling. Same thing when loading weight at the tailgate of a pickup.
Many times. But then that last seat on my bus was SEVERAL feet behind the drive axle, not a foot or two. I still maintain that I don't think it makes all that much of a difference.. And yes, I've tried both. If you want to consider it a point of fact that having the weight a foot or two in one direction or the other makes all the difference in the world, then by all means..
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  #35  
Old 11-08-2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCranger
Lol I hate you guys that don't know what winter is.
I grew up in Northeast PA, then just for the hell of it I went to college in Rochester NY, home of Lake Effect Snow, so I know a thing or two about the white stuff.. enough to know that I'd much rather live in a tropical climate where I can drive a 2x4 all year round!
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  #36  
Old 11-08-2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHBubba
If you want to consider it a point of fact that having the weight a foot or two in one direction or the other makes all the difference in the world, then by all means..
The question is not whether or not it makes a difference (because any engineer will tell you it does) but a matter of whether or not the driver can recognize the difference.
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  #37  
Old 11-08-2004
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mmm northeast pa winters...cant wait BRING IT ON!

i may try the sand bag idea for ***** n giggles this winter...
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  #38  
Old 11-08-2004
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I use bags of solar salt because than in summer i can put the bags in the water softner. And it melts ice better than sand. I think a little weight in the back helps but it didn't matter really because if you don't drive foolishly you should be fine.
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  #39  
Old 11-08-2004
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power slides goin down the street sideways doin fishtales around turns dodgin pot holes at 55mph...aww ya man, its all bout coal region winters...
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  #40  
Old 11-09-2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmacmaster
The idea that spinout and endswapping is caused by weight right in front of the tailgate is a myth based on a theory by people who have not driven a lot on ice and hardpacked snow with the sandbags in that spot or by people who have, but don't know how to drive on ice and hardpacked snow and blame their problems on the sandbags being in front of the tailgate. The more weight on the rear tires, the less likelihood of spinout anyway.
Well, I'd like to thank you for commending my driving ability. :roll: I never said it CAUSES spin outs. I said it can add momentum to one. You don't need a physics degree to see that. I've been putting the weight either against the cab or between the cab and the wheel wells since the day I got my license in a snow storm and it makes a tremendous difference compared to not having them at all.

People say "You don't need them". Yea, you don't NEED them but it sure makes it better. You don't NEED heat either but it beats freezing your *** off.
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  #41  
Old 11-09-2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TBarCYa
Quote:
Originally Posted by NHBubba
If you want to consider it a point of fact that having the weight a foot or two in one direction or the other makes all the difference in the world, then by all means..
The question is not whether or not it makes a difference (because any engineer will tell you it does) but a matter of whether or not the driver can recognize the difference.
The very point I was trying to make.

Quote:
Originally Posted by optikal illushun
power slides goin down the street sideways doin fishtales around turns dodgin pot holes at 55mph...aww ya man, its all bout coal region winters...
Such fun is not limited to you folks in the coal region! ;-)

And Wowak, you're a sellout bro. You can't tell me you don't miss those gray skies of Rochester!
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  #42  
Old 11-10-2004
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well, last winter I survived in the ranger with only sand bags...so..

this year in the BII, I'm finishing wiring up my roof lights, getting another kumho a/t for the rear (nice tires, but 235's are just to small, I need to lift it so I can get a set of 33's under it), changing t-case and tranny oil, winter washer fluid, good wipers, throwing a scraper behind the seat....


and hopefully, best of all, a custom bumper to protect for the crazies, and a hydraulic winch to pull people out of the ditch...
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  #43  
Old 11-10-2004
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New pics, of my truck, Overcast day

https://www.ranger-forums.com/forum/...?p=35911#35911

half way to getting my winter rims/tires on
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  #44  
Old 11-10-2004
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im going to pretty much park the truck.
only drive it once in a while

but i will probably be close to spring before it comes out of the shop so it doesnt really matter to much
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  #45  
Old 11-28-2004
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damn i hate winter...not so much snow...but ICE...damn that stuff...last year my truck ended up in an 8 foot HOLE...not a ditch...a HOLE and i almost flipped it....2 grand later i'm fixed and now i'm all nervous about winter this year....i'm gonna do the sandbag stuff, and undo my airbox mod....try to park in the garage....stock up on cartons of smokes and dip and camp it out....
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  #46  
Old 11-29-2004
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While I read this thread i noticed how you are arguing about the sand bag placement, well if you put all of the weight in one spot say the front of the bed like fireranger said and you count the extra weight of the cab, driver, passanger, and engine, you have one really heavy front end and nothing on the back which sounds like to me it would spin out even easier. so with this said wouldn't it be better to put the weight by the tailgate and help the weight distribution a little. but at the same token too much weight in the rear will cause the front to have less overall weight on the tires therefore some weight would help but too much would make the truck handle worse.IMO
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  #47  
Old 11-29-2004
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I think he (Fireranger) was suggesting to put the weight in the middle of the bed, over the axle, not against the back of the cab. I don't think putting too much weight in the back is possible. Certianly not w/ a few hundred pounds of sand. The engine, cab, and driver are enough weight for the front axle, I think..
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  #48  
Old 11-29-2004
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Since I have a 4x4 I will not put any additional weight in the bed.

Here is a nice MOD I learned on another forum.

Disconnect the wiper fluid hose at the reservoir and at the T connection, save it for spring.
Get a length of tubing the same ID as the washer hose you took off, but about three times as long.
Wrap the new hose around your radiator hose at least 1/2 a dozen times and then reconnect to the washer output heading to the nozzles.
This way your washer fluid is warmed by the radiator hose.
Going 80+ MPH north on the NYS Thruway I know I will appreciate the warmed wiper fluid.
I buy the really good stuff in the winter (rain-X **** yellow) but it still sometimes slush’s up when it hits the windscreen.
This is especially true when the temp is below 0' Fahrenheit and the speed of the truck pushes the wind chill WAY below that.
Driving up at night this is often the case.
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  #49  
Old 11-29-2004
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hmm i thought about doing this before...now i mayhave to try it...
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  #50  
Old 11-29-2004
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Dude, that is brilliant. I'll definately be doing that!!!

I line up the sand bags beween the front wall of the bed and the axle. I don't pile them up against the wall of the bed. Either way, that is hardly the "front" of the truck so the whole thing isn't a worry to begin with.
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