Designed my own electric fan controller - Page 2 - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


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  #26  
Old 11-24-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n3elz
Here's how it could work:

If the Jusnes controller uses a relay that is grounded all the time on one side of the coil, and it applies power to the other side of the coil to activate it, then you would wire the switch with the center wire to the fan relay coil +, an end wire to +12 (switched with the ignition key), and the other end wire to the Jusnes controller output to the relay.

However, I don't know if Bob's controller has the relay "integrated" -- many do. So the above method wouldn't work.

You could use a second relay, controlled by the Jusnes controller, and use the switch as I've described.

Some controllers have an outside "override" position for the HVAC that can be used, but you'd need a diode. It would be helpful to see the Jusnes controller's documentation and then I could draw something up for you.
Not sure what you mean by coil...the Jusnes controller does have a relay integreated into it.
I'll scan the documentation that comes with the controller and post it here.
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  #27  
Old 11-24-2006
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Here is the wiring portion of the documentation

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  #28  
Old 11-24-2006
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Okay, got it. I'll have something up in a little bit. Since you are getting a 2 pole switch, this will be easy enough. The switch I had was single pole (3 terminals, not 6 like the one from the other post).

Standby...
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  #29  
Old 11-24-2006
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Here you go, attached.

Basically, in the middle position, the controller gets no power -- that's your "off" position. In the one position, the controller has power, but is fooled into thinking the AC clutch is engaged all the time -- that's your "ON" position. In the the other position, it gets the normal power and signal from the system and acts just like it does now.

Hope that's clear, if not -- ask questions. Sorry for the crude drawing, but it's how I do it, lol -- "Bob Pease" style. If you don't know who that is, he's an old codger IC designer who writes for "Electronic Design" magazine. I used to draft up sketches, but after seeing his drawings, I decided that it was in fact quicker, easier, and if people don't appreciate it, they don't have to use it!
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  #30  
Old 11-24-2006
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Oh, one additional note: my switch on my system directly activates the relay so that if the controller takes a dump, I can still force the fan on (if the relay still works).

Assuming the Jusnes controller is "simple", and the fan clutch line operates the relay through a diode (common design), then yours will work this way also.

The way to verify this is to disconnect the yellow wire ONLY from the switch, and then switch it to the "ON" position. If the relay engages and the fan runs, you have a "failsafe" position. If the unit fails to run, then you need a "working" controller for the "ON" position to work.

I have no idea how that controller is wired inside. I only know what I designed for.

The primary reason for "fan on all the time", other than failure, is to keep the tranny cooler happy. In very hot weather, when running at slow speeds but with a lot of drivetrain load, the tranny heats up FAST. Putting the fan on helps with that.
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  #31  
Old 11-24-2006
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Thanks John, that makes perfect sense. I'll give it a go soon and hopefully it'll work. I don't see why it wouldn't. Once again, you're the man.
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  #32  
Old 11-25-2006
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Awesome John !!!!!

Can I ask, what e-fan do you have on your truck? And do you monitor your tranny temps? I had the Jusnes fan on mine, but had to take it off because it couldn't keep the tranny cool. I have several theories as why it didn't work, but my main thought was it is too small for the radiator. I would LOVE to find another e-fan ( that covers the radiator) and install it. Your diagram is exactly how I want it wired when I do !!!!
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  #33  
Old 11-25-2006
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I monitor my tranny temps with an oil temperature sender screwed into the test port on the tranny. There's a 1/8" NPT plug in the auto tranny that is there to make pressure checks. You can instead screw in the temperature sensor and you get an "internal" temperature of the oil.

I bought a no-name brand eFan from an eBay vendor that is no longer selling. I really don't know what it is -- just that it moves a LOT of air, is very noisy (until I slowed it down with a 0.3 ohm resistor) and works fine in the hottest part of summer. It has strong straight blades (the quiet curved ones appear to be weaker).

I mounted it IN my existing shroud, and make a silicone rubber sheet piece to cover the gap between the 16" fan and the 18" hole in the shroud. Thus, my fan pulls air through the ENTIRE radiator, not just the 16" round area that most fans do when mounted right on the radiator.

I think the mounting and lack of "full pull" is the main problem with most eFans as mounted and the reason your tranny didn't stay cool.

Stand by as I will find and link my old topics on the sensor and on my fan mounting.
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  #34  
Old 11-25-2006
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This thead describes how I did my oil pressure and tranny temp gauges:
https://www.ranger-forums.com/forum2...ead.php?t=7068

And this one is when I mounted my electric fan -- not real informative, I'm afraid as I didn't take pics when I was putting the fan in the shroud:
https://www.ranger-forums.com/forum2...ead.php?t=2472

Interestingly, the pics for the original sale still seem to come up, so maybe that vendor is still available -- I thought they weren't.

The fan is relatively thin. I used the bracket pieces that came with it to mount it to my shroud, along with some other minor fab stuff anyone should be able to figure out.

Hope that helps.

Edit: I have since replaced the controller shown there, which looks like the Jusnes one but I don't know if it's the same exactly. It failed after getting water in it too many times offroad. The new one is inside the center console in the cab, and only a sealed relay is in the engine compartment.
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  #35  
Old 11-25-2006
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I have my tranny temp gauge mounted in the test port also. When it gets to 240, she pukes !!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by n3elz
I think the mounting and lack of "full pull" is the main problem with most eFans as mounted and the reason your tranny didn't stay cool.
That's EXACTLY what I think !!!!!! Never had a problem keeping the tranny cool with the stock fan, and had problems from day 1 when I installed the e-fan. Went back to the stock fan, and everything went back to normal.


Quote:
Originally Posted by n3elz
I mounted it IN my existing shroud, and make a silicone rubber sheet piece to cover the gap between the 16" fan and the 18" hole in the shroud. Thus, my fan pulls air through the ENTIRE radiator, not just the 16" round area that most fans do when mounted right on the radiator.
That's pretty much what I want to do with a new style (preferably 18") e-fan. I'm just not sure how to mount it securely to the shroud. Summit has an 18" aluminum blade fan (I think it's made by Flex-a-Lite) that I've been debating whether to buy and give it a try.
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  #36  
Old 11-25-2006
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Just looked at the other link. Man I wish you had some better pics of how that thing is mounted !!!!! What type of silicone ring did you use, and where'd you get it?
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  #37  
Old 11-25-2006
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The silicone rubber sheet was leftover material from a vibration isolator I made for a piece of equipment at work. I bought it 10 years ago and the remnant was just laying around. I don't remember where I got it.

But really, any rubber sheet material that can hold up there should work. This stuff was like 3/16" to an 1/8" thick, but very flexible.

Basically, I had 4 brackets that came off the corners of the fan. Two bolted to the shroud at a right angle bend at the end of the bracket, and you can see the nuts on top of the fan.

The other two bolted to the back "face" of the shroud from the flat part of the brackets before the bend. That's all there was to it. The fill sheet had holes in it and was pinched between the fan and the brackets and the brackets and the shroud to secure it.

It's a couple of years now I've been using it, and hitting very deep water and it's all held up so far.

I'm using Amsoil fluid in the tranny (full flush and replacement) and the most I've ever seen it is 220 and it still works fine at that temp -- though I prefer it down around 170-180 or so.
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  #38  
Old 11-26-2006
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This thread blows my mind............
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  #39  
Old 01-23-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n3elz
Here you go, attached.

Basically, in the middle position, the controller gets no power -- that's your "off" position. In the one position, the controller has power, but is fooled into thinking the AC clutch is engaged all the time -- that's your "ON" position. In the the other position, it gets the normal power and signal from the system and acts just like it does now.

Hope that's clear, if not -- ask questions. Sorry for the crude drawing, but it's how I do it, lol -- "Bob Pease" style. If you don't know who that is, he's an old codger IC designer who writes for "Electronic Design" magazine. I used to draft up sketches, but after seeing his drawings, I decided that it was in fact quicker, easier, and if people don't appreciate it, they don't have to use it!
sweet.....glad i nosed around and found this...........hopefully i can remember were it is at on Saturday when i do this to my e-fan.....
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  #40  
Old 01-23-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xtremeranger
This thread blows my mind............
This is what you get when industrial engineers start playing around with trucks, lol...
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  #41  
Old 01-23-2007
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Also, in regard to mounting...

I posted these pics in another thread about some efan damage from offroading (which you can review HERE) where I had to break off a blade to rebalance the fan after I broke a blade offroad.

Apologies for the quality -- I often end up working at night in my driveway (too much else to do, lol) and that's where I took them.







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  #42  
Old 02-21-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n3elz
Here you go, attached.

Basically, in the middle position, the controller gets no power -- that's your "off" position. In the one position, the controller has power, but is fooled into thinking the AC clutch is engaged all the time -- that's your "ON" position. In the the other position, it gets the normal power and signal from the system and acts just like it does now.

Hope that's clear, if not -- ask questions. Sorry for the crude drawing, but it's how I do it, lol -- "Bob Pease" style. If you don't know who that is, he's an old codger IC designer who writes for "Electronic Design" magazine. I used to draft up sketches, but after seeing his drawings, I decided that it was in fact quicker, easier, and if people don't appreciate it, they don't have to use it!
that way works wonders John......that is exactly how it is done....i just did this on my Jusnes Modified efan controller....worked great....your an electrical genius!
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  #43  
Old 02-21-2007
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Griggs, you are a genius. I'm so impressed!
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  #44  
Old 02-21-2007
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Bah. We have so many geniuses on this board I don't stand out as much as I'd like...

Thanks though!
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