Install an electric turbocharger? - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


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  #1  
Old 10-09-2009
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Install an electric turbocharger?

AM Product 3

Thoughts? It might fit our truck between the throttle body and mass air flow.
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  #2  
Old 10-09-2009
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ha ha dont waste youre time.
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  #3  
Old 10-09-2009
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Yeah man, dont waste your money. Its pointless, does nothing and is silly.
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Old 10-09-2009
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No. Well maybe if you combine it with E3 plugs, a Fitch fuel catalyst, intake Tornado, fuel line magnets and a throttle body spacer you might see a gain. A gain of useless parts on your truck that is.
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  #5  
Old 10-09-2009
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Not picking on anyone, but these things are a joke to everyone in the performance world.

At wide open throttle (WOT) your 4.0 will be sucking more air than that thing, or any electric supercharger can pump / blow.
It will reduce power by restricting airflow at anything above 1/3 throttle. Don't do it.

An electric leaf blower running off 120vac... now that might work.
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  #6  
Old 10-09-2009
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Looks promising. You should get it.
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  #7  
Old 10-09-2009
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The Only Variable Speed Electric Supercharger in The World! A first from Singapore.

HAHA its got to be good!!
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  #8  
Old 10-09-2009
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Oh thanks, Ryan. I think I'll try my Black&Decker cordless broom first....LOL
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  #9  
Old 10-09-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEWA-Ranger View Post
An electric leaf blower running off 120vac... now that might work.

Been done before.. Worked better than you will think

Leaf Blower Dyno Pull

Grr.. wont embed

Last edited by StrangerRanger; 10-09-2009 at 08:42 PM.
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Old 10-09-2009
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the leaf blowers work, i've seen one car at the track with 4 gas leaf blowers, worked quite suprisingly...

but as for this thing you posted... here's what we've got... it flows 500 cfm so 500 cubic foot = 14 158.423 296 liters so it will push 14,158 liters every minute. if you have a 4L motor (like i do) it idles at 800rpm, being that it's a 4 stroke, it needs 2L of air every rotation, so at an idle it takes 1600 liters of air per minute, lets scale that up to say... 3000 rpm, a normal shift point for lots of people you are at 6000 liters per minute, scale it up a little more, to redline, 6200 rpm, the redline is 12,400 liters per minute needed

working the numbers out, this would give you a little more power at the top end, and being that the fan speed would be constant (if it's running full out all the time) the less rpm you have, the more of a boost it would give you...

even though the numbers DO say that it would work, the 500 cfm that it flows is under optimum conditions... so any restriction would slow that down, including the air that is being pushed into the engine, the number that the don't give is the pressure, (pounds of boost) i would think that this would be somewhere around 1 psi... which if you know anything about turbo or super chargers, any respectable system starts at around 10 psi, even a mild street turbo to give you a little more boost for passing would be minimum 6psi... i think the mustang SVO was running 13 from the factory...

not to mention that if you put this on, you will be messing your idle speed, and vacuum system, everything that runs on vacuum, like for instance, your heater controls

Last edited by --weezl--; 10-09-2009 at 11:32 PM.
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Old 10-10-2009
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Thanks for the numbers James Luvspu...hey, I do too!

Oh I think it is potent enough for my 4.0, and I like the way it will monitor the engine load and vary the blower speed to match. I'm not sure it would affect the vaccuum system all that much. After all, you still have a fully functional system at full throttle, so what's the diff?

Maybe you could all send me $5 and once I get $680, I'll try it out in the name of science.
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Old 10-10-2009
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wow, $680, i can think of a ton of other things to spend that on
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2009
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And anyone who truly knows boosting and how to boost cars knows that its not the boost that matters, but the cfm the turbo produces. A small turbo can produce 20 psi, but its most effective at 12 when the cfm is higher. Talk to anyone who had some dyno time and there is a point in every boost situation where the turbo or supercharger looses its efficiency. When a turbo car is sitting at idle the cfm from the turbo is more than the intake vacuum of the engine. So its always ahead of the engine and that grows exponentially with rpm.

The problem with this device is that it will loose its efficiency almost immediately. It only has a very very small margin of gain over the engine intake volume at anything above idle. So its a little pointless... I would expect to see the same gains (if any) that you would get from a throttle body spacer.

You want more power? Put the $685 towards an exhaust system with high flow cats, a K&N intake, and a tune.
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Old 10-10-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StrangerRanger View Post
And anyone who truly knows boosting and how to boost cars knows that its not the boost that matters, but the cfm the turbo produces. A small turbo can produce 20 psi, but its most effective at 12 when the cfm is higher. Talk to anyone who had some dyno time and there is a point in every boost situation where the turbo or supercharger looses its efficiency. When a turbo car is sitting at idle the cfm from the turbo is more than the intake vacuum of the engine. So its always ahead of the engine and that grows exponentially with rpm.
while i do agree with you, i think you are missing one important point about the CFM, if you have a fan that will move 1000 CFM this is 1000 cfm @ 0 psi (no resistance) if you put the resistance of the motor on it, that 1000 cfm may drop to 200 cfm @ 1 psi, which would not help the power... the reason that the pressure is mentioned so much is because it is the pressure tht creates the power, however, you need the CFM to keep the pressure up as the motor removes air from the intake, neither CFM nor PSI alone will make an engine have more power...
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Old 10-10-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by --weezl-- View Post
while i do agree with you, i think you are missing one important point about the CFM, if you have a fan that will move 1000 CFM this is 1000 cfm @ 0 psi (no resistance) if you put the resistance of the motor on it, that 1000 cfm may drop to 200 cfm @ 1 psi, which would not help the power... the reason that the pressure is mentioned so much is because it is the pressure tht creates the power, however, you need the CFM to keep the pressure up as the motor removes air from the intake, neither CFM nor PSI alone will make an engine have more power...
Yes, but the fan will make 0 psi. You can place your hand over the exhaust of the fan and completely stop all flow of air. The tolerances in the fan are not close enough to actually make boost. That's why I was saying that at idle is the only time the fan will "work". Any time the engine requires more air flow the fan will just be overrun.
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Old 10-10-2009
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yes, i agree, i think that was mentioned in my first post about it
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  #17  
Old 10-10-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by --weezl-- View Post
yes, i agree, i think that was mentioned in my first post about it
Ah, I see now.
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  #18  
Old 10-10-2009
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I'm not after a power boost for my ride, just posting something I thought was interesting. I've had zero dyno time, never owned a supercharged or turbocharged vehicle, and can't technically argue whether it's the boost or air flow that really matters.

There's this practical side to me that says if adding an inch of space to the throttle body gives more power, Ford would do so. And if a cheap tubular electric fan stuffing air down the intake made a big difference, Ford would add one of those as well.

But then there's this other side to me that says, hey, why let the engine suffer with each breath, struggling to suck that precious air through a filter when you can have more than the usable amount waiting to be plunged down yer valves....it's gotta be beneficial. Not $700 worth mind you, but beneficial nonetheless. And I really doubt the electronic gizmo part can accurately track engine load and deliver the perfect amount of air oversupply as needed, but then.......nah.
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Old 10-10-2009
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the throttle body spacers DO add more power, so do changing your mass air flow sensor housing to a larger one (not sure about our trucks, but i got about 15 hp on my mustang, larger throttle bodies also add power... it's just not significant... same with the fan posted above, while it probably will add more power, it would probably add around 5 horsepower, which is NOT enough to feel, where as exhaust and intake, which would cost around the same, would probably add 30
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