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Old 09-06-2013
GMG GMG is offline
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Using High Powered Magnets to filter fluids

I recently changed the differential fluid in my 2003 Mazda B2300 with 38.5K miles on it. (Low miles but very dirty Differential fluid)

I'm glad I did, as the fluid was dirty and the filler plug magnet was covered in a thick layer of metal "fur".

That got me to thinking about adding a magnet to the outside of the steel differential cover to aid in removing "metal fur" from the oil.



From there I decided to add one to the transmission pan as well:



These are the magnets that I purchased:
Amazon.com: CMS Magnetics® 150 LB Holding Power Neodymium Round Base Magnet w/ Countersunk Hole 1.89" - 1 Ct.: Home Improvement Amazon.com: CMS Magnetics® 150 LB Holding Power Neodymium Round Base Magnet w/ Countersunk Hole 1.89" - 1 Ct.: Home Improvement


You have to mount them as shown. The 150lb of force is only applicable to the one side. The side facing you in the photos has limited magnetic ability.

Relative to the exact position, I must say that these magnetics are literally ripped out of your hands as you approach steel and kind of go where they please. I will need some kind of "hook" tool to pull them off in the future.

Anybody else tried this "technique"? I know for a fact that magnets do indeed pull metal from the oil as proven by the plugs on my B2300, LS430, BMW 545i and Q45.

They all had "metal fur" on them when I drained the differential fluid.
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Using High Powered Magnets to filter fluids-img_03721_zps2558baab.jpg   Using High Powered Magnets to filter fluids-img_03731_zps5a4a9a38.jpg   Using High Powered Magnets to filter fluids-img_03721_zps2558baab.jpg   Using High Powered Magnets to filter fluids-img_03731_zps5a4a9a38.jpg  

Last edited by GMG; 09-06-2013 at 04:43 PM.
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Old 09-06-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GMG View Post
Anybody else tried this "technique"?
I know many aftermarket covers come with a magnetic drain plug at the end of a 'dip stick' type setup.

My Mag-Hytec setup comes with one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mag-Hytec

Q: Why does Mag-Hytec use a Magnet?

A: As the metallic components in transmissions and axles wear, they generate very fine particle debris that becomes suspended in the lubricating oil. A suspended magnet acts as a filter to contain these particles, keeping the fluid cleaner and extending component life. Periodic checking and cleaning of the magnet is recommended for maximum fluid service life.
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Last edited by logan03CO; 09-06-2013 at 08:02 PM.
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Old 09-06-2013
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I know a bunch of power wagon guys put speacial magnets inside the diff for that reason. I've seen some that put them on the outside like that becuase they were scared to put it inside. I know the ones inside collect a lot, not sure the ones on the outside.
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Old 09-07-2013
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That's def an alternative to the expensive mag hytec ones.
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Old 09-09-2013
GMG GMG is offline
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I'll let you guys know how well it works the next time I drop either of the pans/covers.

Regarding the magnetic ability of this outside technique. The magnetic force travels out from the magnets North Pole into the Differential/ Transmission casing for an area greater than the size of the magnet before it returns to the magnets South Pole.

So the Differential/Transmission housings become highly magnetic for an area slightly larger than the size of the magnet.
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Old 09-12-2013
GMG GMG is offline
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I'm thinking of putting one of these 150lb magnets on my oil pan and them removing it just before draining the oil and then putting it back on once I've changed the oil.

Does the "magnetization" of the oil pan immediately disappear once you remove the magnet from the pan or does it "linger" for some period of time?

If I remove the magnet, will all of the metal particles drop into the oil and then flow-out with the dirty oil, or will they remain stuck to a magnetized surface even though the magnet has been removed?

Last edited by GMG; 09-12-2013 at 03:49 PM.
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Old 11-15-2013
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i imagine that some residual magnetism would be there. but if you put the magnets close to the drain then it should flow out nice when you drain out. and residual will go back to the magnets when replaced or go straight to the filters. but remember there are magnets inside the transmission all ready. and its good to service metal build up more than you think and replace trans filters. the stop and go traffic we deal with these days will kill any trans or rear end.
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Old 11-15-2013
GMG GMG is offline
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Originally Posted by victhemann View Post
i imagine that some residual magnetism would be there. but if you put the magnets close to the drain then it should flow out nice when you drain out. and residual will go back to the magnets when replaced or go straight to the filters. but remember there are magnets inside the transmission all ready. and its good to service metal build up more than you think and replace trans filters. the stop and go traffic we deal with these days will kill any trans or rear end.
Do you know if the oil pan is steel or aluminum on a 2.3L - 2003?
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Old 12-06-2013
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Gentlemen...

About every third oil change, I go 7500 miles between changes (Mobile 1 synthetic), I send samples of engine oil, transmission fluid, and differential lubricant to a company called Oil Analyzers, Inc.. Google it and you will find all the information you need concerning engine, transmission, and differential lubricant contamination. About every sixth oil change I also have my engine coolant analyzed as well. Ffter your initial sampling, each subsequent analysus will tell you, in detail, just how the moving parts that require lubrication, are wearing.

The kits are "item specific", and run about $35 bucks for each kit.

Engine Oil, Transmission Fluid, Differential Lubricant, and for those of you that are driving 4x4's, Transfer Cases, analysis kits" will cost about $120-$150 per analysis (depending on the number of fluids you wish to have analyzed and how many "kits" you need). They keep a data base on each of your components and each analysis 'kit' is engine make and displacement specific. They also give you information on what parts are wearing abnormally, thereby allowing you to replace worn parts whose failure might effect other parts.

Please understand, I am NOT dissing debris removal magnets or plugs. They do a very good job of keeping metal debris out of lubricants. They have been used in the aircraft industry since forever and I use them myself.

They are, without doubt, excellent ways of keeping debris out of liquid lubricants. However, one must remember they apply only to ferrous metal contamination. And many of the parts in rotating or reciprocating components are made of materials that magnetic particle removal does not apply to.

IMHO...lubricant analysis is cheap insurance if it prevents a catastrophic failure caused by wear that occurs in every engine, transmission, differential, and transfer case, and any other assemblies that require liquid lubrication.

Just sayin'...

JEG
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Old 12-06-2013
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Say James, I use Mobil 1 too, and it works wonders, just a question pic 1st Cav- Ft. Hood?
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Old 12-07-2013
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We might not be discussing this in this forum...check out my thread in "General Ford Discussion".
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