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Wheels & Tires Semi-Tech General discussion of wheels and tires for the Ford Ranger.
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  #1  
Old 12-21-2010
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air pressure

I am currently running stock 245 75R 16 A/S tires on my 2002 Xlt 4 X 4 Ranger, no decal on door jam to tell me correct air pressure, am currently running 32 Lbs. Can someone inform me of what I should have in tires in wintertime, most driving is highway and some snow. Thanks GREAT site for Ranger info.....
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Old 12-22-2010
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Wirelessly posted

I have a 97 and mine I believe is 40 rear and 35 front.
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Old 12-22-2010
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If they are "p" rated, ie. P245 75r 16's and not "LT" (light truck) tires, then 32 all around will give you better economy, 26-28 psi will give you better traction.
LT pressures will be cosiderably higher, and will have a max pressure on the tire sidewall.
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Old 12-23-2010
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I go by what the tire mfg recommends rather than what that sticker says for the sole reason that I am no longer on OEM-supplied tires.

This holds true for my race bike, truck, trailer....everything.

For my truck - 40 front and rear on Cooper something-or-others
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Old 12-23-2010
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what ever pressure that allows the tire tread to sit flat to the pavement. usually is right around the recommended 32 for rangers. decrease for slight traction gain, increase for better gas mileage. (at the expense of uneven tread wear if run for an extended amount of time) always run the same psi per wheel when using 4x4 though.

Max psi stamped to the side wall are just that, the max rating. the psi of your tires has more to do with vehicle weight then it does with the tire being used.

you should never fill your tire up to max rating.
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Old 12-23-2010
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Originally Posted by RangOH View Post
what ever pressure that allows the tire tread to sit flat to the pavement. usually is right around the recommended 32 for rangers. decrease for slight traction gain, increase for better gas mileage. (at the expense of uneven tread wear if run for an extended amount of time) always run the same psi per wheel when using 4x4 though.

Max psi stamped to the side wall are just that, the max rating. the psi of your tires has more to do with vehicle weight then it does with the tire being used.

you should never fill your tire up to max rating.
agreed i tell people this all the time ,i run what the door jam says to run 30 psi
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Old 12-23-2010
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i run 35 in everything but thats just me! RangOH is spot on with what he said!
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Old 12-23-2010
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door jam on my 04 is 30 - 30. front/rear
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Old 12-23-2010
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Out of the several hundred thousand miles I've driven and ridden, I have yet to see this tire wear issue as a result of running higher pressures. This is first-hand, real-world experience, FWIW.

Without getting deep into a debate over this, a tire manufacturer knows the range of operation for their specific products and it's the tires which connect your vehicle to the road, not the sticker on the door jamb. Tire design, sidewall structure and basic assembly of the carcass all play key factors in what a tire maker suggests for pressures. Vehicle mfg's typically don't account for aftermarket products and tend to build a kind of "safety net" into certain suggestions....ie; oil changes every 3000 miles.

What happens when you decide to get new rims and low-profile tires? Whether it be your truck, car, school bus, whatever, are you still going to run 32 psi on a 45-series tire because that's what the sticker says? I certainly hope not.

For me, I'd rather cover my *** by filling the tires to the tire maker's suggestion.

EDIT: For clarity, I'm not saying go to max pressure however I am saying that operating 15 lbs under the sidewall max isn't ideal.
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Old 12-24-2010
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It really depends on the tire. What load ranger is it? What type of tire? And it depends on what you want to deal with. Better traction in the winter? I run 27PSI on my 30PSI passenger tires. If it's REALLY bad out I air them down to 23-25PSI. But if that's the case the roads are covered in ice and it is only for a very short trip. Wouldn't get on the highway or anything.
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Old 12-24-2010
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If there is a absolute "recommended" tire pressure on the side of the tire then by all means fill it to that!

Ive never seen anything but a "recommended MAX" psi stamped to the side wall. The sticker cannot predict a change in tire size and design.
This is why I say it is best to visually fill your tires to a psi that allows the full cross-section of the tread to make contact with the pavement.
If only the center most area of the tread is touching then the tire will only wear on the center area making contact (causes cupping over time).

Filling your tires close to max can be dangerous because once you start driving the tires heat up, air expands and can quickly exceed the max pressure. same thing can happen just by parking in the sun for a while.

Also for every 10deg temp difference (from when you fill the tire) causes a +/- 1-3 psi change, so always check your tires when the seasons change (or regularly).
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Old 12-24-2010
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Old 12-24-2010
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12 psi all the way around!!
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Old 01-09-2011
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if you dont know find your gvwr then hit up a shop a get them to look it up in the load tables. the book will tell you how much pressue the tire needs relative to its size and load required to support. Never go by the sidewall! EVER! thats only there so you dont go past the limit. plus LT and P rated tire have completely different load ranges so make sure you calculating for the right tire.
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