queston on bfgoodrich mud-terrains - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


Wheels & Tires Semi-Tech General discussion of wheels and tires for the Ford Ranger.
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  #1  
Old 09-25-2005
05edge's Avatar
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queston on bfgoodrich mud-terrains

would 265/75/16 fit on my stock 16" rims? i'm a noob at this so can you please help me?
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  #2  
Old 09-25-2005
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yes they will but do me a favor and serch for info like this first. Its been covered a billion times.

welcome to the site too.
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  #3  
Old 09-25-2005
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will fit fine.

i had 265/75/16's on my stock rims, and no tbar crank
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  #4  
Old 09-25-2005
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yup they'll fit, I'd personaly crank up the torsion bars a little to make it look better. Welcome to RF, i live in new england too!
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Old 09-25-2005
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yes. next time use the bloody search...
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  #6  
Old 09-25-2005
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zach not all newbies know to use the search. or sometimes they dont feel like sifting through ALL the threads with "265" in them. i agree that they should have searched first but there is no reason to be rude, we were all newbies at one point
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  #7  
Old 09-25-2005
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thanks for all of your help.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Redneckstone
yes. next time use the bloody search...
if it makes you feel beter, next time i'll use the search
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  #8  
Old 09-25-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 05edge
thanks for all of your help.




if it makes you feel beter, next time i'll use the search
Dont let zach bother you, hes a good guy. All hes tryin to say is 9 tmes out of 10, its been asked before. The search helps out alot. Give it a try, maybe youll find what you need......

Welcome to the site, theres lots of info here.
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  #9  
Old 09-25-2005
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Just to help ya I'll break down tire size ratings.

Most tire sizes begin with a letter or letters that identify the type of vehicle and/or type of service for which they were designed. The common indicators are as follows:

P225/50R16 91S

P = When a tire size begins with a "P," it signifies the tire is a "P-metric" size that was designed to be fitted on vehicles that are primarily used as passenger vehicles. This includes cars, minivans, sport utility vehicles and light duty pickup trucks (typically 1/4- and 1/2-ton load capacity). The use of P-metric sizes began in the late 1970s and they are the most frequently used type of tire size today.

225/50R16 92S

If there isn't a letter preceding the three-digit numeric portion of a tire size, it signifies the tire is a "Metric" size (also called "Euro-metric" because these sizes originated in Europe). While Metric tire sizes are primarily used on European cars, they are also used on vans and sport utility vehicles. Euro-metric sizes are dimensionally equivalent to P-metric sizes, but typically differ subtly in load carrying capabilities.

LT245/75R16 108/104S

LT = If a tire size begins with "LT," it signifies the tire is a "Light Truck-metric" size that was designed to be used on vehicles that are capable of carrying heavy cargo or towing large trailers. This includes medium and heavy-duty (typically 3/4- and 1-ton load capacity) pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles and full-size vans. Tires branded with the "LT" designation are the "little brothers" of 18-wheel tractor-trailer tires and are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo.

7.50R16LT 112/107Q, 8.75R16.5LT 104/100Q or 31x10.50R15LT 109Q

LT = If a tire ends with "LT," it signifies the tire is either an earlier "Numeric", "Wide Base" or "Flotation" Light Truck size designed to be used on vehicles that are capable of carrying heavy cargo and towing trailers (Numeric sizes), use 16.5-inch diameter rims (Wide Base sizes) or are wider, oversized tires designed to help the vehicle drive on top of loose dirt or sandy surfaces (Flotation sizes). This includes light, medium and heavy-duty (typically 1/2-, 3/4 and 1-ton load capacity) pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles. Tires branded with the "LT" at the end of their size designation are also the "little brothers" of 18-wheel tractor-trailer tires and are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo.

Section Width

Following the letter(s) that identify the type of vehicle and/or type of service for which the tire was designed, the three-digit numeric portion identifies the tire's "Section Width" (cross section) in millimeters.

P225/50R16 91S

The 225 indicates this tire is 225 millimeters across from the widest point of its outer sidewall to the widest point of its inner sidewall when mounted and measured on a specified width wheel. This measurement is also referred to as the tire's section width. Because many people think of measurements in inches, the 225mm can be converted to inches by dividing the section width in millimeters by 25.4 (the number of millimeters per inch).

225mm ÷ 25.4 = 8.86"

Sidewall Aspect Ratio

Typically following the three digits identifying the tire's Section Width in millimeters is a two-digit number that identifies the tire's profile or aspect ratio.

P225/50R16 91S

The 50 indicates that this tire size's sidewall height (from rim to tread) is 50% of its section width. The measurement is the tire's section height, and also referred to as the tire's series, profile or aspect ratio. The higher the number, the taller the sidewall; the lower the number, the lower the sidewall. We know that this tire size's section width is 225mm and that its section height is 50% of 225mm. By converting the 225mm to inches (225 ÷ 25.4 = 8.86") and multiplying it by 50% (.50) we confirm that this tire size results in a tire section height of 4.43". If this tire were a P225/70R16 size, our calculation would confirm that the size would result in a section height of 6.20", approximately a 1.8-inch taller sidewall.

Internal Construction

A letter (R in this case) that identifies the tire's internal construction follows the two digits used to identify the aspect ratio.

P225/50R16, P225/50ZR16

The R in the P225/50R16 91S size identifies that the tire has a Radial construction in which the tire's body plies "radiate" out from the imaginary center of the wheel. Radial tires are by far the most popular type of tire today representing over 98% of all tires sold.

If the R in the size was replaced with a D (225/50D16), it would identify that the internal tire body plies crisscross on a Diagonal and that the tire has a "bias ply" construction. Tires using this construction are for light truck and spare tire applications.

If the R in the size was replaced with a B (225/50B16), it would identify that the tire body plies not only crisscross the tire on a diagonal as before, but that they are reinforced with belts under the tread area. This type of tire construction is called "Belted." Tires using this construction are practically extinct.

Speed Rating

Today, the only tires that continue to include the speed rating "in" the tire size (P225/50ZR16) are Z-speed rated tires. In this case, following the two digits used to identify the aspect ratio are the letters ZR to identify the tire's speed rating (Z) and its internal construction (R). Since 1991, all other speed ratings are identified in the tire's Service Description (which will be covered shortly).
Tire and Wheel Diameter

P225/50R16 91S

The 16 indicates the tire and wheel diameter designed to be matched together.

Tires that have a rim diameter expressed in inches (P225/50R16, as well as 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26 and 28) are called "inch rim" sizes, are the most common type of tire size and are used on most cars, minivans, vans, sport utility vehicles and light duty light trucks.

While not as common, two additional "unique" types of tire/wheel diameters are still in use today.

Tires and wheels that have a rim diameter expressed in "half" inches (8.00R16.5LT, as well as, 14.5, 15.5, 17.5 and 19.5) are used on some heavy-duty trailers, heavy-duty light trucks and box vans.

Tires and wheels that have a rim diameter expressed in millimeters (190/65R390, as well as, 365 and 415) are called millimetric sizes. Michelin initiated millimetric sizes for their TRX tires that saw limited use on many different car models in the late 1970s and 1980s.

Michelin PAX System run flat tires have been introduced as an integrated wheel/tire system on a very limited basis as Original Equipment (O.E.) in North America. An example PAX System size of 235/710R460A 104T expresses tire and wheel dimensions in millimeters (235 mm Section Width, tire Overall Diameter of 710 mm and a 460A mm rim diameter, with the "A" in 460A signifying these tires feature “asymmetric” beads in which the outside bead (450 mm) and inside bead (470 mm) are actually different diameters.

All of these "unique" tire/wheel diameters were developed specifically because the tire and wheel design or intended vehicle use required them to be different than conventional tires and wheels. All of these tires and wheels feature bead profiles that have a different shape than traditional "inch rim" sizes.

Tires and wheels with unique rim diameters should never be combined with traditional "inch rim" tires and wheels.

It is critical that the tire and wheel diameters are always confirmed to match before the tire is mounted on the wheel. **Not exactly true. You can have different wheel and tire diameters. Lots of people do it to run 10 inch wide tires on 8 inch wide rims so that they can use 33x10.50.

Aaron
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  #10  
Old 09-25-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 05edge
thanks for all of your help.




if it makes you feel beter, next time i'll use the search

good job noob! thats all we ask, it seems like we're gettin pissed, but we're not. It will just make things go a lot smoother!!
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  #11  
Old 09-25-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundPer4mance
zach not all newbies know to use the search. or sometimes they dont feel like sifting through ALL the threads with "265" in them. i agree that they should have searched first but there is no reason to be rude, we were all newbies at one point
bob I am not mad. and also arnt people suposed to read the rules before they register or am I wrong...
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  #12  
Old 09-25-2005
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Originally Posted by Redneckstone
bob I am not mad. and also arnt people suposed to read the rules before they register or am I wrong...

I doubt you read the rules when you registered man. Neither did I. And it's not that someone thinks you're mad. You're just not posting nicely, you could've said that nicely, or not at all since Gildo said it. The guy even said he'd search next time.

Aaron
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  #13  
Old 09-25-2005
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Originally Posted by Red_Ak_Ranger
I doubt you read the rules when you registered man. Neither did I. And it's not that someone thinks you're mad. You're just not posting nicely, you could've said that nicely, or not at all since Gildo said it. The guy even said he'd search next time.

Aaron
yes acully i did read then call me crazy but yes i did
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  #14  
Old 09-25-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redneckstone
yes acully i did read then call me crazy but yes i did
YOU'RE CRAZY!!!



Aaron
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  #15  
Old 09-25-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Ak_Ranger
EDIT: (Soundper4mance) i cant believe you quoted his whole huge post!!
Hint Hint, that would be a nice sticky.

Last edited by SoundPer4mance; 09-25-2005 at 09:28 PM.
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  #16  
Old 09-25-2005
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Sorry Bob I wasnt thinking.
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