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Wheels & Tires Semi-Tech General discussion of wheels and tires for the Ford Ranger.
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  #51  
Old 04-12-2009
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basically it wears less on the sidewalls and keeps them looking like new. This is because they are over inflated.
looking new on the outside because the inside will be down to the cords
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  #52  
Old 04-12-2009
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looking new on the outside because the inside will be down to the cords
ZAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
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  #53  
Old 04-12-2009
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But that is because there is nothing touching except the center of the tread......*shakes head*
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  #54  
Old 04-12-2009
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ZAAAAAAAAA

LOL
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  #55  
Old 04-12-2009
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ROFL... haha... jesus.. wow...


also to save yourself the trouble dunes 10psi max...
Probably not. if I had BFG A/T's I would because I know they have beefier (tri-guard or whatever they call it) sidewalls then my kumho's. I dont want to damage the inside sidewalls of my tires and have one blow out some where in the UP of michigan. Also my kumhos dont have much in the way of sidelugs so I dont think that airing down that far would give me much more of an advantage.
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  #56  
Old 04-12-2009
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Probably not. if I had BFG A/T's I would because I know they have beefier (tri-guard or whatever they call it) sidewalls then my kumho's. I dont want to damage the inside sidewalls of my tires and have one blow out some where in the UP of michigan.
lol i can tell you havent been on dunes before.. let me know after about 10 min at the dunes how the 15psi is working for ya drop down to 10 then see its night and day


hell i dont think there is anyone at the dunes with year with BFG's i know mine will be at 10 or lower hell chad runs 6-7 and he had STOCK jeep tires on his 4door
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  #57  
Old 04-12-2009
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Its not the side lugs that are important, it is your overall foot print of your tire. IT is like adding tracks to your truck, it distributes the load over a greater area. I do the same thing snow wheeling. They drop to 10 psi, and I can float over the snow instead of digging down.
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  #58  
Old 04-12-2009
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Probably not. if I had BFG A/T's I would because I know they have beefier (tri-guard or whatever they call it) sidewalls then my kumho's. I dont want to damage the inside sidewalls of my tires and have one blow out some where in the UP of michigan. Also my kumhos dont have much in the way of sidelugs so I dont think that airing down that far would give me much more of an advantage.
you will not be in the UP you will be in the LP and, anything over 10 will be trouble, trust me. i ran 10 the first day in my sport kings because i was ignorant to sand like you are. Second day ran 8 and my truck was like a tractor. BUT...im also locked front and rear
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  #59  
Old 04-12-2009
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looking new on the outside because the inside will be down to the cords
Well if you knew how people drove their trucks up here you may understand. 95% of the trucks up here (in the cities I should say) that have any type of A/T's or lift have never seen anything off road......ever. Most of them are all for show and they want to look good. I only suggest going up to 50 I don't inflate them for them.
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  #60  
Old 04-12-2009
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you will not be in the UP you will be in the LP and, anything over 10 will be trouble, trust me. i ran 10 the first day in my sport kings because i was ignorant to sand like you are. Second day ran 8 and my truck was like a tractor. BUT...im also locked front and rear
its the same if you arnt locked...
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  #61  
Old 04-12-2009
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you will not be in the UP you will be in the LP and, anything over 10 will be trouble, trust me. i ran 10 the first day in my sport kings because i was ignorant to sand like you are. Second day ran 8 and my truck was like a tractor. BUT...im also locked front and rear
Im coming home over the UP. Hell yeah id be down with running 6-7 psi but I have a 650 mile trip home. Ive seen the insides of enough tires to know that, running them that low can ( I use can loosely) cause damage, and I dont want to risk it that far from home. Well see how it goes, maybe I will go to 10. Hell I may even have a new set of threads by then, and kill my kumhos for the fun of it.
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  #62  
Old 04-12-2009
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usually 8psi in a 33 will not cause the inner sidewall damage though. what tires do you have?
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  #63  
Old 04-12-2009
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usually 8psi in a 33 will not cause the inner sidewall damage though. what tires do you have?
I have 265/75R16 Kumho Road Venture A/T's. Ive been eyeing the michelin LTX M/S or the X-Radial LT (pretty much the same tire).

You would be surprised 8 PSI can damage the inside of a tire. I have seen a few flat repairs come in where they have 5-10 PSI and the interior sidewalls are shreaded, not always but it does happen. If I was 15 miles from home it wouldnt be as much of a problem, I just dont want to be stuck driving a couple hundred miles home on a spare tire (235/70R16).
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  #64  
Old 04-12-2009
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take into consideration you will probably drive about 10 miles with your tires like that, mostly on sand. to and from the camp ground is like 3 miles
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  #65  
Old 04-12-2009
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Just a couple of things I would like to add to this discussion:

1) Don't forget that the ambient temperature at which you check the tire pressure can change, and that the PSI can/will change if the ambient temperature changes.

2) The simple fact of driving (e.g. at extended highway speeds) and/or hard braking (heat generated, and transfered, to tires) can/will change tire PSI.

3) Carrying a portable 12V plug-in compressor (or an "air-pig") can allow you to adjust your tire pressure to suit your driving conditons (e.g. going from Off-Road pressures to "regular" road pressures) "on the spot".

4) As far as I understand, you should "never" exceed the tire manufacturer's recommended maximum tire pressure, which is right there on the sidewall of each and every tire. (Though I realize that people do it all the time.)

5) Fiddling with tire pressure can also affect the handling of your vehicle: race car drivers have known this for years. Generally, higher pressures in front than rear promote "oversteer"; higher pressures in the rear tires than the fronts promote "understeer".

6) Since even a couple of PSI difference (in tires) can affect many variables such as ride, traction, handling, etc, and even those are affected by variables such as the load carried by the vehicle, terrain, etc, "optimum" tire pressure is as much an "art" as a science, and must really be customized to suit the particular driver in question, as well as the terrain (- short of "general" rules such as "more PSI = harsher ride").

7) The vehicle manufacturer's recommended PSI for tires is in reference to the OEM equipment tires (or equivalent) that comes with the truck and is likely generally optimized for "most" drivers, under "most" everyday conditions - it stands to reason that if you have modified your equipment (to non-OEM), e.g. oversize tires, then you should go by the manufacturer's specs for your present (non-OEM) equipment.

Just a couple of thoughts.


BTW, I keep my tires around 30-32 PSI, max recommended PSI on my tires (stock sized 245/75/16s) is 35; I do mostly highway driving, and keep PSI under max to allow for the tires heating up at sustained hwy speed; tire pressure is checked at least every couple of days.

And FWIW, my original (OEM) tires lasted almost 180,000 km (~110,000 miles), and about 4 years; present set is about 2 years old, about 130,000 km (~75,000 miles) on them.

Last edited by north44; 04-13-2009 at 12:21 AM.
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  #66  
Old 04-13-2009
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Originally Posted by chainfire View Post
50 PSI!!!!!!

man your nuts. I could see 50 psi MAYBE on an fullsize that is towing a heavy load, but on a Ranger? BS! That is like riding on a set of hockey pucks.

But your right, you will keep the sidewalls nice and sharp, only because they are not even touching the ground.
my tires are rated for max 60 psi. pirelli A/T 245/70/16

and on the front u can still see the tire with cheeks... and on the rear... trust me that with half a ton - to little over a ton the tires need to be with the 55 psi i ride em with .

lol and i just unloaded my truck so u could see how tires looked with 55 psi and 600kg on the bed :P
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  #67  
Old 04-13-2009
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Originally Posted by north44 View Post
Just a couple of things I would like to add to this discussion:

1) Don't forget that the ambient temperature at which you check the tire pressure can change, and that the PSI can/will change if the ambient temperature changes.

2) The simple fact of driving (e.g. at extended highway speeds) and/or hard braking (heat generated, and transfered, to tires) can/will change tire PSI.
2 to 4 PSI is about all the change you are going to see for a change in tire pressure. If you have nitrogen your looking at a change of 2 to 3 PSI. Nothing that is going to cause a major change in the way your tires work.

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Originally Posted by north44 View Post
3) Carrying a portable 12V plug-in compressor (or an "air-pig") can allow you to adjust your tire pressure to suit your driving conditons (e.g. going from Off-Road pressures to "regular" road pressures) "on the spot".
Not needed for most drivers. If you are airing down off-road and then hitting the streets then yes. For most drivers if the door tag says 30PSI you put in 30 when its "cold" and 32-33PSI when its "warm". Remember most air gauges are not 100% accurate and will be off a pound or 2 anyways.

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Originally Posted by north44 View Post
4) As far as I understand, you should "never" exceed the tire manufacturer's recommended maximum tire pressure, which is right there on the sidewall of each and every tire. (Though I realize that people do it all the time.)
Exactly correct. NEVER exceed the max pressure of a tire, the results can be fatal.

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Originally Posted by north44 View Post
5) Fiddling with tire pressure can also affect the handling of your vehicle: race car drivers have known this for years. Generally, higher pressures in front than rear promote "oversteer"; higher pressures in the rear tires than the fronts promote "understeer".

6) Since even a couple of PSI difference (in tires) can affect many variables such as ride, traction, handling, etc, and even those are affected by variables such as the load carried by the vehicle, terrain, etc, "optimum" tire pressure is as much an "art" as a science, and must really be customized to suit the particular driver in question, as well as the terrain (- short of "general" rules such as "more PSI = harsher ride").
The first part is true, but I think you have it backwards, but I maybe wrong

The second part is somewhat true. It takes more then a couple PSI to change the characteristics of a tire, more like 5 to 10 PSI depending on the tire. A softer tire (snow tires) will change with more with less of a pressure change and a stiffer tire (truck) will change less with more of a pressure change. Its not a black and white thing if you change 2 PSI. Yes you could precisely measure the changes on paper or in a lab but in the real world you wont feel a difference between 30 and 35.

Quote:
Originally Posted by north44 View Post
BTW, I keep my tires around 30-32 PSI, max recommended PSI on my tires (stock sized 245/75/16s) is 35; I do mostly highway driving, and keep PSI under max to allow for the tires heating up at sustained hwy speed; tire pressure is checked at least every couple of days.
Your max tire pressure is a "cold" pressure, and by "cold" I mean the temp of a tire that has been sitting for a couple hours. You do not need to compensate for the increase in pressure for when the tire warms up. All tire pressures measured on the side of tires or on the door frame are cold temps.

Now take this with a grain of salt and DO NOT twist my words:
Although a tire says the max is 35 PSI cold it can handle a lot more. I have seen vehicles come in with 115 PSI (it was QUICKLY lowered). If you are worried that if you put 35 in there cold and it will heat up and be at 38PSI warm, you have nothing to worry about. The tire can handle it. You arnt inflating past the max because the 35PSI max means "cold" pressure not the warm pressure

Quote:
Originally Posted by north44 View Post
And FWIW, my original (OEM) tires lasted almost 180,000 km (~110,000 miles), and about 4 years; present set is about 2 years old, about 130,000 km (~75,000 miles) on them.
Are you running BFG Commercial T/A's?
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  #68  
Old 04-13-2009
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^ I'm only saying what I have written, no more and no less.

Consistent 30 - 32 PSI seems to work best for me in terms of ride, handling, longevity, etc., under the conditions in which I most often drive, with the loads that I am most often carrying - and so I try to maintain that (according to the tire pressure gauge that I carry - which BTW I have calibrated to a fair degree of accuracy) under most general conditions (and temperatures).

It works for me - it may be different for someone else.
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  #69  
Old 04-13-2009
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Geeze you guys, this is almost turning into a conventional vs synthetic conversation. lol
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  #70  
Old 04-13-2009
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Geeze you guys, this is almost turning into a conventional vs synthetic conversation. lol
Except it is SEVERE OVER INFLATION vs Normal.
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  #71  
Old 04-13-2009
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I keep my 31x10.5x15 BFG All Terrains @ 34psi. Works for me. As for looking at the door sticker, that's great if you are still running your OEM tires from the factory or have purchased similar tires. Larger tires throw those numbers out the window as they are no longer OEM size.
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