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Old 02-09-2011
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Serpentine tensioner replacement

I have a 99 Ranger with a 3.0L with A/C 5 speed 4x4 and need to replace the serpentine pulley tensioner (bearing) but the book I have (Chilton) says nothing about replacing it and am not sure how to remove it.

Does anyone have experience doing this and could give me some tips?

Thanks!
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Old 02-09-2011
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.

I just went outside with a flashlight and now feel stupid for asking the question in the first place because it looks like all I need is a 7/16 or 1/2 inch socket that most likely loosens clockwise.:star:
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Old 02-10-2011
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The tensioner has a little square in it that's meant to accept a ratchet or beaker bar. It's in the front side of the tensioner arm. You put a ratchet in that and push or pull the tensioner until the belt is loose. Remove the belt. Then while holding the tensioner arm still with one ratchet, you use another to loosen the pulley that's on the tensioner arm.

I've been meaning to replace mine for months now. I've got a new pulley but just haven't done it. It's been too damn cold and sloppy outside. I have looked it over though and it looks simple enough. I replaced the upper idler pulley and it can't be much different than that.

Someone correct me if there's a better way.


GB :)
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Old 02-10-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird76Mojo View Post
The tensioner has a little square in it that's meant to accept a ratchet or beaker bar. It's in the front side of the tensioner arm. You put a ratchet in that and push or pull the tensioner until the belt is loose. Remove the belt. Then while holding the tensioner arm still with one ratchet, you use another to loosen the pulley that's on the tensioner arm.

I've been meaning to replace mine for months now. I've got a new pulley but just haven't done it. It's been too damn cold and sloppy outside. I have looked it over though and it looks simple enough. I replaced the upper idler pulley and it can't be much different than that.

Someone correct me if there's a better way.


GB :)
Correct. You don't have to hold it any longer after you get the belt off. Just loosen it the way that won't let the tensioner arm turn with it (Rt hand thread or Lt. hand thread)
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Old 02-12-2011
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I did some belt work not too long ago. My tensioner does not have a square hole. I had to use the screw for the pulley to loosen the tensioner. Talk about a PITA!
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