Which vehicles have this trans? - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


Drivetrain Tech General discussion of drivetrain for the Ford Ranger.

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  #1  
Old 06-19-2012
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Which vehicles have this trans?

I think I did some serious damage last winter to my plow truck trans. Changed and flushed fluid and filter but still slips some. It's an 89 4WD and I "think" it has the A4LD in it going by the "T" under transmission on the driver's door post. Can see nothing on the trans itself. Truck is only worth maybe $7-800 bucks so rebuild would be more than it's worth. Wondering if anyone knows which years and vehicles would have the same one? I hate to go into winter not knowing if it's gonna make it. Thanks
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Old 06-19-2012
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yep you have a A4LD.

Heres what ive got for info on it.

1985-1994 Ranger & Bronco II With Overdrive.

The A4LD four speed overdrive transmission was introduced in the 1985 Ford Ranger and saw use behind many 4 and 6 cylinder engines until the 1995 model year when it was replaced by the 4R44E and 4R55E electronic transmissions. The A4LD is identified by transmission code 'T'.

The A4LD was the first Ford transmission to use an EEC-controlled torque converter lock-up clutch and later became the first to use electronic shift control (via a 3-4 shift solenoid). The French-built A4LD was created by adding overdrive to the front of the C-3 three-speed unit. The A4ld has a 2.47 first gear and a 0.75 overdrive.

For 1995, the 4R44E (4 cylinder - light-duty) and 4R55E (6 cylinder - heavy-duty; IE: Explorer) electronically controlled transmission replaced the A4LD. It is mechanically identical to the A4LD.

These four and five-speed transmissions are used in four cylinder and V-6 applications (primarily the Ranger and Explorer). The A4LD was derived from the C-3 three-speed automatic transmission by placing a two-speed overdrive unit in front of the original three-speed workings. As the names imply, the "E" transmissions are electronically controlled (similar to the AOD-E/4R70W transmissions), while the 5R55E is a five speed version currently used only with the SOHC 4.0L engine. The 4R44E is a light duty version of the electronic unit, similar to the old non-4.0L A4LD transmission.

The A4LD is identified by a "T" transmission code. The overall length of this transmission is 28.687-inches. There are no adapters available to swap this transmission to a V-8 at this time.

Known Problems:

Premature wear or a repeat failure of the converter hub, bellhousing bushing, converter seal and/or pump assembly may be caused by a broken or worn crank shaft pilot sleeve. Located between the flywheel and the crank-shaft, the pilot on the front of the converter is centered on the hole in the sleeve.

To avoid these come backs remove the flywheel and visually inspect the spacer on every 2.8, 2.9, and 4.0 engine that may be suspected of having this problem.

If the original bellhousing bushing is not worn, reuse it. Converter hub to bellhousing bushing clearance should be .002"-.003" Converter depth from the front of the pad to front of the bellhousing should be 1 5/8" to 1 3/4".

If you have repeated front seal blowouts on A4LD's it may not be a problem with the seal or the quality of your work. Your could have a bad bellhousing. The bushing used in the A4LD is finished in place. Because of this the bore that the bushing fits into doesn't need to be in the center of the bellhousing, and in many cases it isn't. When you're working on an A4LD you need to check the bellhousing bushing to see if it's the original factory bushing. If it is, and it's not worn (no more than .003") converter hub to bushing clearance), Don't Replace It! If the bushing needs to be replaced, you need to make sure the replacement bushing will fit in the center of the bellhousing. To do this bolt the torque converter to the flex plate. Turn the engine over and check the runout of the converter hub. Now bolt the bellhousing to the engine. If the Torque converter is contacting one side of the bushing excessively, the bushing is off center and the bellhousing MUST be replaced. However, a slight amount of contact is acceptable. By checking the bellhousing first you can avoid repeated front seal blowout.

Solenoids:

The best that can be told from the ATSG manual, the changeover date for single to dual solenoid versions occurred in mid 1988. The single solenoid originally on the 1985-1987 transmission only controls the torque converter lockup function. Later models had the 3-4 shift inhibit solenoid added in 1988.

Length:

28.687-Inches

Cooler Lines:

The top cooler line is the cooler return line.

Band Adjustments:

O/D = 1 turns

Intermediate = 1 turns

Reverse = Not Adjustable

Gear Ratios:

1st = 2.47:1

2nd = 1.47:1

3rd = 1.00:1

4th = 0.75:1

Reverse = 2.1:1


So if you can find another ranger, or bronco your in business. make sure they have the same motor
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Old 06-19-2012
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Perfect my friend! All the info I'll ever need, then some! Now I can start looking for one. Thanks so very much!!!!!
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Old 06-19-2012
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Any time.

Pulled that info from the tech library on TRS.

just so theres no issues.
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Old 06-25-2012
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Located a used A4LD at a great price....free. Wondering how many seals should be replaced and their location/part#? Also, is there a link for how to remove and install this trans?? Thanks to anyone who can help!
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Old 06-25-2012
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I didn't specifically see anything here, but as Nate mentioned, TRS tech library is a GREAT resource. Here's a link in case you haven't found it.
http://www.therangerstation.com/tech_library/index.php
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Old 06-26-2012
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Thanks Steel! Appreciate it very much!
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Old 07-01-2012
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Got the A4LD trans and started tearing mine out of the Ranger (A4LD came from an 86 Bronco 2 4x4 w/OD). The trans in the truck looks nothing like the A4LD so now I don't know what I have?? Truck is an 89 Ranger 4X4 automatic w/OD. The pan has 18 bolts. ( A4LD has about 12). Compared the distance from the front of the bell housing to the transfer case and it's a good 4" longer than the A4. Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.

Both engines are 2.9L
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