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  #1  
Old 06-03-2008
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CAD Drawings of light tabs

Hey,
im in a cad class, and i wanted to do something i could use as my final project. (very easy compared to what i normally do) so i made a light tab based off of graniteguy's design.
here it is, my cad designed light tab.
lighttab-2.jpg?t=1212543013
EDIT: i know theres a few mistakes to the eye of a draftsman, but all the numbers should be right.
editx2: the bottom left drawing, 1.13 should be 2.25 and in the top left, the 3 should be 6 i messed up scaling a little bit :)
editx 3: i messed up scalling alot. ill have a new one thursday. sorry.
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Old 06-03-2008
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Nice. Sorry, you don't have to read this if you don't want to, but I do drafting (mostly) for a living, so I can't keep my mouth shut... or fingers off the keys.

Right off the bat, I'm seeing no callouts for the size of the holes, no hidden lines and centerlines for the holes on the right side view, dimensions encroaching on the border, and dimensions on top of the leader in the top view. Also, when you bend steel, it is incredibly hard to get it to be a 90 degree angle like that, without losing too much strength or welding. Those 90 degree lines should actually be filleted.

Oh, and if you don't want anybody to know your last name, its listed in the top right window of each post you make... that is, unless that's not your last name.

Nice project, I miss drafting class.
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Old 06-03-2008
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its not my full last name and yeah. this was a pretty quick bang up job. i needed a really quick final project and the teacher wont really know. im probably going to major in engineering. but if i have time, ill fix that
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Old 06-03-2008
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Cool, mine's not Vane either... though it sounds cool.

If you're good at math and memorizing formulas, then engineering is the way to go. I have an associates degree in mechanical engineering, and it was rough. If you like drafting, you can always go and get a CAD certificate (I have one as well). Its easier and draftsmen make decent money.

My drafting teacher would never let me get away with something like that as a final project. Thats what I get for showing my potential, it was still fun though.
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  #5  
Old 06-03-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winks View Post
Nice. Sorry, you don't have to read this if you don't want to, but I do drafting (mostly) for a living, so I can't keep my mouth shut... or fingers off the keys.

Right off the bat, I'm seeing no callouts for the size of the holes, no hidden lines and centerlines for the holes on the right side view, dimensions encroaching on the border, and dimensions on top of the leader in the top view. Also, when you bend steel, it is incredibly hard to get it to be a 90 degree angle like that, without losing too much strength or welding. Those 90 degree lines should actually be filleted.

Oh, and if you don't want anybody to know your last name, its listed in the top right window of each post you make... that is, unless that's not your last name.

Nice project, I miss drafting class.


I too am a draftsman for a living. I agree with winks 100%.

Good luck on your drafting.
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Old 06-03-2008
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Originally Posted by winks View Post
Cool, mine's not Vane either... though it sounds cool.

If you're good at math and memorizing formulas, then engineering is the way to go. I have an associates degree in mechanical engineering, and it was rough. If you like drafting, you can always go and get a CAD certificate (I have one as well). Its easier and draftsmen make decent money.

My drafting teacher would never let me get away with something like that as a final project. Thats what I get for showing my potential, it was still fun though.


I have an AAS in Architectural Engineering. I hated mechanical drafting in college and high school, but now I am doing almost 100% mechanical drafting/engineering for my job. I am a fire suppression engineer.
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Old 06-03-2008
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I'm in drafting for school and it looks pretty good. other than what winks said. Do you have dimension printing?
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  #8  
Old 06-03-2008
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yeah, id show you guys some of my other stuff, but apparently when my friend and i have been "sick" (im a senior...) other people have gone on our pc's and printed our work as theirs, so he got rid of all of our drawings. i normally wouldnt do something that easy. but i was pressed for time. and its not or final, just we need something of our own. ill try and touch it up thursday.
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Old 06-03-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winks View Post
Nice. Sorry, you don't have to read this if you don't want to, but I do drafting (mostly) for a living, so I can't keep my mouth shut... or fingers off the keys.

Right off the bat, I'm seeing no callouts for the size of the holes, no hidden lines and centerlines for the holes on the right side view, dimensions encroaching on the border, and dimensions on top of the leader in the top view. Also, when you bend steel, it is incredibly hard to get it to be a 90 degree angle like that, without losing too much strength or welding. Those 90 degree lines should actually be filleted.

Oh, and if you don't want anybody to know your last name, its listed in the top right window of each post you make... that is, unless that's not your last name.

Nice project, I miss drafting class.


i agree...


i do steel fabricating, and i look at hundreds of drawings that i form, and you have no real inside dimensions, or bend lines, no material strechout, no flat layout, no hole size
... just throwing out my 2 cents, but ither than that, not bad
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Old 06-03-2008
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Yeah, Drafting is fun.......But I ended up on the other end of it as a machinist. Now I get to ***** about crappy drawings and idiot engineers all day. J/K, What software are you using? I use solidworks and it makes a real nice drawing for ya when you design a part.
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  #11  
Old 06-03-2008
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i use cadkey 19. i did a little autocad, but the teacher didnt know how to use it and i was on my own.
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  #12  
Old 06-04-2008
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Your teacher doesn't know how to use the #1 design and drafting software in the WORLD

You are not learning anything. All industry either uses AutoCAD or MicroStation (junk IMO).
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  #13  
Old 06-04-2008
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correction all industries use Revit 2009, AutoCAD is old man, we only run projects through our office if they have been started more than 2 years ago. Anything that we start is started in Revit, just thought I'd give my 2 cents, since this is my professional field as well.
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  #14  
Old 06-04-2008
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See how far I am away from the mechanical industry. I know the structural industry (building) uses some form of AutoCAD, usually either AutoCAD or AutoDesk Architecture (which is an awsome program).
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  #15  
Old 06-04-2008
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I'm not sure how "old" you think Autocad is. I've used it at every job I've been in since 1997. And my last two jobs have been with the industries nuclear power plant design leaders. We use Inventor for the models (which I'm about to learn), but all drawings are created using Autocad. I've never heard of Revit.
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Old 06-04-2008
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Not that I'm trying to show off or anything... buuut. Well you know how it is.

If you make it out of 3mm thick 1020 CRS (7 guage) and have a 2lb light. You'll have a fore/aft safety factor of 4.61. And a side to side safety factor of 6.53

Here are videos showing how it'll deflect under loads in both directions.

Me and "drafting" are close buddies.

Regards,
Rich
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Old 06-04-2008
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That isn't showing off Rich, that is something that would need to be worked out in engineering.
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Old 06-04-2008
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Originally Posted by lifted97ranger View Post
that is something that would need to be worked out in engineering.
Huh? I am an engineer and I just "worked it out" for him.
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Old 06-04-2008
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edit

Last edited by wydopnthrtl; 06-04-2008 at 11:08 AM.
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  #20  
Old 06-04-2008
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edit
Just curious, what type of industry are you in? How do you get parts made without detail drawings? I'm currently on the "engineering" side of my industry, but my last job was on the "manufacturing" side. We would get a stack of 2D Autocad generated drawings from the engineers, then sometimes we would have to create even more 2D Autocad drawings for the shop clarification. I can't even imagine manufacturing finely machined parts and weldments without quality, detailed drawings.
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Old 06-04-2008
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I edited that last post. I think I came off as sounding too arrogant. Sorry. It's just that I know my craft to a very deep level.

I'm in OEM automotive, marine, heavy truck, and consumer goods. Mostly automotive though.

I will give you one point you make. Weldments. Almost all welding is still done by someone holding a gun or by a tech reading a print and manualy programming a robot.

As far as making parts. Nearly all our tooling vendors take the 3D model w/annotation and design the molds and/or stamping dies from it. Shoot they even have licenses in high end softwares like Catia V5 that will generate the parting line for you then make hot and ejector side of a die automaticly.

Even inspection these days is done via a photo system or automated CMM.

2D drawings are no longer the "rule". They are the "expection" for big business.

Just two days ago I was in a prototype shop making a mechanisim for heavy truck. They laser cut the parts, cnc'd the forming tools, and even inspected the assembly with a CMM. Not one piece of paper was used in a $7k prototype.

Once the proper CAD system is in place for the customer and supplier. Its faster and cheaper to not use paper and have to deal with all the constraints that come with. Mis-intrepretation / ignorance being the number 1 problem.

Rich

Last edited by wydopnthrtl; 06-04-2008 at 11:35 AM.
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  #22  
Old 06-04-2008
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In school we use inventor for some stuff. and for houses and so we use Revit and Viz. anybody completely understand viz?
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  #23  
Old 06-04-2008
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Huh? I am an engineer and I just "worked it out" for him.
I know, but it is something that should be done during and prior to the final drawing.
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  #24  
Old 06-04-2008
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Originally Posted by wydopnthrtl View Post
I edited that last post. I think I came off as sounding too arrogant. Sorry. It's just that I know my craft to a very deep level.

I'm in OEM automotive, marine, heavy truck, and consumer goods. Mostly automotive though.

I will give you one point you make. Weldments. Almost all welding is still done by someone holding a gun or by a tech reading a print and manualy programming a robot.

As far as making parts. Nearly all our tooling vendors take the 3D model w/annotation and design the molds and/or stamping dies from it. Shoot they even have licenses in high end softwares like Catia V5 that will generate the parting line for you then make hot and ejector side of a die automaticly.

Even inspection these days is done via a photo system or automated CMM.

2D drawings are no longer the "rule". They are the "expection" for big business.

Just two days ago I was in a prototype shop making a mechanisim for heavy truck. They laser cut the parts, cnc'd the forming tools, and even inspected the assembly with a CMM. Not one piece of paper was used in a $7k prototype.

Once the proper CAD system is in place for the customer and supplier. Its faster and cheaper to not use paper and have to deal with all the constraints that come with. Mis-intrepretation / ignorance being the number 1 problem.

Rich
That's really interesting. I didn't know that type of thing was going on. However, I still don't think that 2D drawings are no longer the "rule".

Everyone I've ever dealt with over the years has used some sort of 2D cad package, mostly Autocad. I actually design internals for nuclear reactors. If anything needs to be manufactured to the highest quality, it's nuclear reactors, and we produce a crapload of drawings for them. All of our manufacturing facilities, machine shops, ect. use some sort of 2D cad drawings. Even all of our overseas subsidiaries and suppliers. We design tooling to be used in replacing/repairing intricate parts that are over 40 feet under nuclear contaminated water inside a reactor, all with 2D drawings.

I've been involved with ASME code pressure vessel manufacturers, and even did HVAC design which included architecural and engineering firms. All used 2D cad.

I'm just surprised to hear the things you are saying.
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  #25  
Old 06-04-2008
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All of our fire suppression drawings are in 2D. Even the fire sprinkler engineers I deal with draw in 2D. They do some 3D modeling on sprinkler risers, but no more.
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