sandbags in a 4wd? - Page 2 - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


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  #26  
Old 01-20-2009
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Took my mechanic an hour and a half to do plugs yesterday. They are an absolute pain in the a$$. You absolutely cannot reach the back ones unless you have like 12 elbows and miniature tools lol.

Just the fact it is a 4.0 4x4 Ranger means you are going to get crap milage. Get used to it.
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  #27  
Old 01-20-2009
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Yeah, and unfortunately, with winter conditions, gas mileage naturally goes down the tubes, not only using 4wd, but extended idling, warming the vehicle up, and the cold with the sluggishness it causes upon morning start-ups, well that all decreases gas mileage.

I use 4wd in conditions that warrant it (snowy, slick surfaces), because I'd rather put up with the lousy mileage just for the additional safety factor, and I've never felt the need to put extra weight in the back - and as posted earlier, one accident/incident, and anything you save in gas goes out the window (repairs, down time, even getting towed out of a ditch - haha, ask me about that one - they all cost).

As for a tune-up, well lots of info on that; I can tell you that on the SOHC 4.0 V6, the driver's bank of plugs is relatively easy - passenger side, especially the rearmost one, not so much - get into that last plug through the wheel well is the easiest, maybe the only way.

Anyway, Ross, you may just want to pull the driver's side, frontmost plug and examine it to see its condition before you go further with plugs/wires. I first changed the plugs and wires on my truck at around the 100,000 mile mark, PCV was changed at this time as well, so if they weren't already done on your truck, they may be due, but you may be able to delay that until spring when the weather's better.

You may also want to examine the front diff, rear diff and transfer case fluids in the spring as well, if you didn't look at them when you bought the truck. Look in your maintenance schedule/owner's manual (I think you can also get it on-line if it didn't come with your truck) for the change intervals. I changed all of mine at around or before the 150,000 km/90,000 mile mark or so, but this is maintenance, and probably doesn't necessarily impact your gas mileage concerns.

Dirty air filter is always a bad sign but you've already changed that; fuel filter, if it hasn't been changed, well, it's always a good idea to keep it fresh - by 100,000 miles, I guess I was on about my 3rd fuel filter (but they are a PITA to change, especially if you haven't done one before, not to scare you off - there are posts on this matter - and you will need a special tool to disconnect the clips).

Cost of all these things, in CDN $, to the best of my recall: fuel filter's about $20.00, air filter about $15.00, spark plugs (platinum NGK) about $5.00 apiece, wire set was about $70.00 to $80.00, PCV (valve) was about $15.00 and was a dealer item - everything else I got from an independent auto parts store - dealer prices generally higher. I imagine US prices are probably lower all around.

Not really difficult to do the work - just elbow grease and sweat, and time - and much easier to do when the weather's warm or if you're in a heated garage - a hoist is a real bonus.

FWIW, I run synthetic - I find that it just seems that much easier on the engine (especially on start-up) in sub-zero temps. However, whatever oil you use, regular and frequent changing of the oil and filter is the key - I do mine every 5.000 km/3,000 miles.

Taking the easy way, at this point, maybe put a couple of bottles of Fuel Injector cleaner in the tank, maybe drive it easy for a while longer, compare your gas mileage when the weather is a bit better and you're not in 4wd. You've only had the truck a short while - maybe not long enough to compile a statistically valid sample for the overall gas mileage; as with so many things, time is the truest test of all.

And remember, after all is said and done, it is a truck, not an econo-car, and the 4 liter SOHC, well, it's quite easy to drive it pretty hard with those horses underneath your right foot.

If I've missed anything, feel free to pipe up, people.

Hope this kind of helps
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  #28  
Old 01-20-2009
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I have the same truck in a 2wd version and I got around 300 miles to a tank, it's a 19.5 gallon tank by the way. I was getting about 15 or so mpg around town back then.
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  #29  
Old 01-20-2009
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Originally Posted by north44 View Post
Another funny thing about calculations - rather than km per gallon, or even km per liter, the calculation is based on liters per 100 km (liters/100 km), at least in Canada.

Combined city/highway, I use about 13 - 15 liters per 100 km.

That's a little less than 4 U.S. gallons to go about 65 miles or so.

I figure, with conversion, I get about 18/19 miles to the U.S. gallon - add a little over 20% more for mileage in Canadian (Imperial) gallons, and you're up around the 23-25 mile range per gallon (CDN).

Seems to be in line with what everyone else gets with a similar configuration.

Using 4wd - naturally mileage drops, sometimes drastically - slippery roads, less traction = wasting gas with wheels slipping; also the cold weather conditions usually means more idling = poorer gas mileage.

BTW, doesn't the 4 x 4 come with a 19.5 U.S. gallon tank? My Ranger 4 x 4 takes something like 74 liters.
i feel like im back in high school math class holy ****.. you canadians are confusing hahahahahah jkkk
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  #30  
Old 01-20-2009
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Originally Posted by pace51 View Post
In all honesty unless you go with a 4cyl mini truck you're better off with full size. More room more power and better fuel milage
x2 if i was to buy a new truck and needed 4x4 it would be a fullsize

but i dont need 4x4 so if i were to buy a new truck it would be an 09 2.3l ranger xcab manual in vista blue.
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  #31  
Old 01-20-2009
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Old school 4x4 4 and 6 cyl minis rock....Mazdas,Nissans,Isuzus,Yotas from the 70s to 90s. They're not too bad on gas either for what they are.

The Ranger is in an odd spot. You would think it would have good gas milage being small and light, but it gets fullsize milage.

I love my truck though. It's a good size for what I need. However, knowing what I know now, I think I see an F150 4x4 in my future as a replacement.
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  #32  
Old 01-20-2009
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Originally Posted by jaycheetwood View Post
i feel like im back in high school math class holy ****.. you canadians are confusing hahahahahah jkkk
You try growing up in a country that used "Imperial" gallons, which is different from what they use in the country's largest trading partner (the U.S.) that also uses a "gallon", but it is about 20% smaller.

Distances used to be the same, inches, feet, mile - and then spend all your early years memorizing; 12 inches = 1 foot, 3 feet = 1 yard, 5,280 feet to a mile, 1760 yds to a mile, and so on - and also, Do you remember "furlongs" or is that only limited to horse racing fans these days?

Then have the (CDN) government decide that things should be metric, like the rest of the world, in the name of uniformity, even though your largest trading partners still use mostly Imperial (English) measurements, though volume of liquids, as mentioned, is different.

And then sports measurements, e.g. for football, even up here is in yards, in baseball the distances are still in feet (e.g. between the bases), and so those terms are still in use up here.

A lot of us still refer to acres and square miles (for area, e.g. for farms), but highway signs are metric.

And then, in the middle of all this, you end up having to duplicate sets of tools because you have these metric measurements (e.g. in sockets) for tools, even though the standard drives are still "Imperial" (1/4 ", 3/8", 1/2") - all because for some reason, even "domestic" manufacturers started going metric in some areas.

Not to mention the constantly fluctuating exchange rates for our money when we visit the U.S. - usually your dollar is higher as well.

So, in the middle of all this, of course it's confusing - we have to do the math - it's a matter of survival!


P.S. Oil is still bought and sold in "barrels" which is defined in terms of U.S. gallons, not liters.


But, I digress, the topic of the post is/was . . . ?

OK, to bring it back on topic:
I would forget about the sandbags, just use 4wd for added traction; as for the bad gas mileage, try a couple of basic maintenance items now, to see if it improves your mileage, and keep track of things, and then go for a full blown tune-up and maintenance schedule when the weather is milder, and see, over all that time period, if the mileage improves.

It would seem that you can expect some improvement in mileage up to about 18 - 20 mpg (U.S. )
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  #33  
Old 01-20-2009
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Originally Posted by north44 View Post
And then, in the middle of all this, you end up having to duplicate sets of tools because you have these metric measurements (e.g. in sockets) for tools, even though the standard drives are still "Imperial" (1/4 ", 3/8", 1/2") - all because for some reason, even "domestic" manufacturers started going metric in some areas.
noticed this when i changed the oil on my truck its metric i was suprised cause ive always had hondas before and it made sense that those were metric but not a 2.5l lima lol
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  #34  
Old 01-20-2009
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Originally Posted by rizoss16 View Post
I just bought my truck last week, its a 4.0 4wd, I have been getting pretty bad gas mileage, last tank I clocked 210 miles and filled up 15.8 gallons from empty, I guess I have a 16 gallon tank? Anyways It has snowed a few times and I have been using 4wd alot, on and off, probably about half of the time was 4wd. Is it better to use the 4wd in the snow or should I put sandbags in the back and just use 2wd? How much weight should I put in the back? Is it better to use the sandbags or to use 4wd for fuel economy? Does the 4wd really use alot more gas? Or is it miniscule? Im just wondering if I will be getting better gas mileage in the summer when I dont have to use 4wd. I am on half a tank now and the clock read 105 miles. Looks like its gonna be about the same again.
This is exactly what I do EVERY year in my ( 4x4 ) it stays like this all winter and works out very nicely especially in a ( 4x4 )
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  #35  
Old 01-20-2009
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Originally Posted by north44 View Post
You try growing up in a country that used "Imperial" gallons, which is different from what they use in the country's largest trading partner (the U.S.) that also uses a "gallon", but it is about 20% smaller.

Distances used to be the same, inches, feet, mile - and then spend all your early years memorizing; 12 inches = 1 foot, 3 feet = 1 yard, 5,280 feet to a mile, 1760 yds to a mile, and so on - and also, Do you remember "furlongs" or is that only limited to horse racing fans these days?

Then have the (CDN) government decide that things should be metric, like the rest of the world, in the name of uniformity, even though your largest trading partners still use mostly Imperial (English) measurements, though volume of liquids, as mentioned, is different.

And then sports measurements, e.g. for football, even up here is in yards, in baseball the distances are still in feet (e.g. between the bases), and so those terms are still in use up here.

A lot of us still refer to acres and square miles (for area, e.g. for farms), but highway signs are metric.

And then, in the middle of all this, you end up having to duplicate sets of tools because you have these metric measurements (e.g. in sockets) for tools, even though the standard drives are still "Imperial" (1/4 ", 3/8", 1/2") - all because for some reason, even "domestic" manufacturers started going metric in some areas.

Not to mention the constantly fluctuating exchange rates for our money when we visit the U.S. - usually your dollar is higher as well.

So, in the middle of all this, of course it's confusing - we have to do the math - it's a matter of survival!


P.S. Oil is still bought and sold in "barrels" which is defined in terms of U.S. gallons, not liters.


But, I digress, the topic of the post is/was . . . ?

OK, to bring it back on topic:
I would forget about the sandbags, just use 4wd for added traction; as for the bad gas mileage, try a couple of basic maintenance items now, to see if it improves your mileage, and keep track of things, and then go for a full blown tune-up and maintenance schedule when the weather is milder, and see, over all that time period, if the mileage improves.

It would seem that you can expect some improvement in mileage up to about 18 - 20 mpg (U.S. )

lol,oh so true.
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  #36  
Old 01-21-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by north44 View Post
You try growing up in a country that used "Imperial" gallons, which is different from what they use in the country's largest trading partner (the U.S.) that also uses a "gallon", but it is about 20% smaller.

Distances used to be the same, inches, feet, mile - and then spend all your early years memorizing; 12 inches = 1 foot, 3 feet = 1 yard, 5,280 feet to a mile, 1760 yds to a mile, and so on - and also, Do you remember "furlongs" or is that only limited to horse racing fans these days?

Then have the (CDN) government decide that things should be metric, like the rest of the world, in the name of uniformity, even though your largest trading partners still use mostly Imperial (English) measurements, though volume of liquids, as mentioned, is different.

And then sports measurements, e.g. for football, even up here is in yards, in baseball the distances are still in feet (e.g. between the bases), and so those terms are still in use up here.

A lot of us still refer to acres and square miles (for area, e.g. for farms), but highway signs are metric.

And then, in the middle of all this, you end up having to duplicate sets of tools because you have these metric measurements (e.g. in sockets) for tools, even though the standard drives are still "Imperial" (1/4 ", 3/8", 1/2") - all because for some reason, even "domestic" manufacturers started going metric in some areas.

Not to mention the constantly fluctuating exchange rates for our money when we visit the U.S. - usually your dollar is higher as well.

So, in the middle of all this, of course it's confusing - we have to do the math - it's a matter of survival!


P.S. Oil is still bought and sold in "barrels" which is defined in terms of U.S. gallons, not liters.


But, I digress, the topic of the post is/was . . . ?

OK, to bring it back on topic:
I would forget about the sandbags, just use 4wd for added traction; as for the bad gas mileage, try a couple of basic maintenance items now, to see if it improves your mileage, and keep track of things, and then go for a full blown tune-up and maintenance schedule when the weather is milder, and see, over all that time period, if the mileage improves.

It would seem that you can expect some improvement in mileage up to about 18 - 20 mpg (U.S. )
i got a headache.


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  #37  
Old 01-21-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaycheetwood View Post
i got a headache.





Then you're going to love this one: the metric system has already started making inroads.

Besides metric tools that all you guys use, just think of the only products sold in the States that are in metric.

Don't think there are any?

(And I was told this by an American friend.)

Yes, there are!

It's the 2-liter soft drink bottle!!!


Maybe soon, you too can calculate your mileage in terms of:
liters/100 kilometers!!!



Then, you'll really go !!!


And to keep on topic: I can kind of see how a couple of 100 kilograms of weight in the bed wouldn't hurt the traction of a truck, even 4wd, but I've never really found it necessary.
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  #38  
Old 01-21-2009
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about average, I would run some sea foam through it to clean out the engine some or the motorcraft equivalent, change plugs wires, air filter and should be good.

also check your tire psi that can affect gas mileage to.
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  #39  
Old 01-21-2009
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I just finished off the second tank since I got my truck (4.0 4x4)

I averaged 17.1 mpg with about 80% highway and 20% city with a bit of playin in the snow

At $2.50 per gallon and 12k miles per year it would cost about $1765 at 17 mpg.

With your celica at 30 mpg, it would be $1000.

4x4's aren't cheap to run. Definitely not the 4.0, but you have to justify it by liking the truck itself or by modding and playing with it. If the extra cost of fuel is going to be too much for you, then you may need to consider if that is the truck for you.

Obviously, it probably isn't in your best interest to sell a truck you just bought and just put $800 into. If you're actually taking it easy, you should be able to get more mpg than an average of 13, but not much if you're constantly in stop and go city traffic.

Also keep in mind that lifting your truck and adding big tires will hurt your mpg even more. Again, it's about deciding what is important to you- gas mileage or a big truck.
Looking around here, you can see that many members have chosen the latter.
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  #40  
Old 01-21-2009
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Even when I had a 2wd 3.0 auto I was getting around 13-15 city in the winter with the winter fuel mix, the ranger v6's really like to suck the gas down.

Now with my 2.3 5 speed with winter mix I get around 22-25 city depending on how cold it is and if Im heavy with my foot. Summer Time I get around 28-30 Mixed driving with it being mostly city.
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  #41  
Old 01-21-2009
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I get a consistent 18 mpg city and about 22 hwy. With 4WD on all the time.

in 2WD they grow to 20 and 23 respectively.

my truck is all stock with the 4.0 sohc, auto and 4.10's. with the exception of an 87 mileage tune from rouge performance.

just don't tromp it and you should be ok. also with the 5 speed try short shifting her around 2500 or so.

but with all that being said if you can fit an f150 into your lifestyle go for it.Same fuel mileage and a lot more truck. I couldn't, it was just too big for my needs.
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  #42  
Old 01-21-2009
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I get 20.5mpg highway and I usually shift at 3000 rpm, sometimes higher if I want to accelerate quickly. I did a tune up at 65000 on my truck. That included plugs and wires. I have 4.0 sohc, 4:10's, and a 5-speed. I use 4wd almost everyday in the winter and don't put any weight in my bed. If I am in 2wd I spin my tires all the time and it doesn't seem to affect mpg, it probably will affect my tire wear though.
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  #43  
Old 01-21-2009
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I would have to say that having a truck and enjoying GREAT gas mileage with it are mutually exclusive.

And if gas mileage is your greatest consideration in a truck, then getting one with the smallest engine available would make most sense - you see them often enough - usually company trucks, whose drivers flog the heck out of them because the gas money isn't coming out of their pockets.

Kind of funny that saving money on those company trucks by putting in the smallest engine (for good gas mileage) is often offset by the fact that those trucks always seem to be the most heavily loaded up, and driven the hardest - you would think that any savings in gas would have to be eaten up in more wear and tear on the engine, drivetrain, etc.

With 4x4 there is an associated gas penalty, not only with the larger engine, and the additional weight in the drivetrain, but also the fact that conditions requiring 4wd by their very nature will burn more gas (off-roading, slippery/snowy road conditions, etc) - so when you use it, it's going to cost you (in gas).

The benefits of 4wd are well worth it for me - worth a little extra in gas costs. With the 4.0 liter SOHC V6, you can spin the tires in the wet from a standing start going up even a slight incline if you're not gentle with the gas pedal.

With that kind of power underfoot, it can present a real problem in the snow, so I, for one, am happy to have 4wd, and to use it anytime the weather conditions warrant.

And I can't really complain about the gas mileage on the Ranger - I used to have a 4.0 liter Jeep - and that was a real pig on gas.

These days I just go real gentle on the gas - no stomping the accelerator for me. My "go-fast" days are well behind me. If I wanted to go fast, I guess I'd be driving a 5.0 liter Mustang or some other such beast - just as if I wanted GREAT gas mileage, I'd be looking at a Toyota Corolla or Honda Civic or something similar.

I still think a truck is the best all 'round, all purpose vehicle available - and 4x4 is the way to go if you need it (for weather conditons) or just want it (e.g.for off roading).
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  #44  
Old 01-21-2009
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Well you have to remember too for whatever reason you get worse mpg in the winter because of the gas than you do in the summer. I have a 4x4 4.0 and got really good MPG in the warmer mnths. When it turned cold my MPG went down. I was averaging 290-310 a tank in the warmer mnths now it like 215-260 a tank.
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  #45  
Old 01-21-2009
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read my sig. as for the bags or 4wd debate, i find it doesn't really matter if i use my 4wd. it might cost me an extra 50-75kms per tank. i'm not that hard up on loosing that much milage for control.

it might even even out if you use 2wd and 150-200lbs as opposed to 4wd and no weight.
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  #46  
Old 01-21-2009
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Do your homework before buying a vehicle... 4wd naturally hurts your gas mileage and hurts it even more when it's actually turned on... these trucks DO get better mpg than a truck but they don't hold a candle to a car. They have a purpose and fuel efficiency is not it. Also it's really personal preference w/ the sand. Sand + 4wd will do a lot but I don't use sand anymore 'cause I just feel better w/ 4wd on so I found myself using it anyway. Sand will give you more weight = more traction in any situation.
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