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Suspension Tech General discussion of suspension for the Ford Ranger.

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  #26  
Old 01-31-2005
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I've never seen a seperate adjustment purely for ride height. What would that be? Adjusting the point where the spring/strut mounted to the suspension?! That's the only way I can envision adjusting the ride-height w/o increasing the pre-load on the spring..

I admit, I'm not anything close to an expert on this stuff, but I buy what John and Bob are saying. For a given, constant vehicle weight, adjusting the pre-load will change the operating region of the suspension's range of motion, sure. And I can see why that would be bad, especially if you overdo it and force the suspension too close to the ends of it's range. But it seems quite viable up to a certian point..

Personally my truck handles anything I ask of it. Maybe my requests aren't 'hardcore' enough, or maybe the truck's just fine as it is. Either way I am uninterested in any form of lift myself. I'd be more interested in leveling it out and keeping those half shafts straight. I remember replacing CV joints on my last FWD car.. I'd rather not do that for as long as possible w/ this truck. Would leveling it lengthen the life of these joints?
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  #27  
Old 01-31-2005
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I am saving all my coins to buy a properly fitting suspension lift and new axles
hopefully more manufactures will step up to make a 4x4 lift for newer Rangers
I would not crank my torsen bars unless I felt the truck was not sitting properly
cranking the torsen bolts sets up too much negative camber (I know an alignment can adjust that) for my taste
I also would want to increase wheel travel not decrease it with any method employed to lift the truck
if cranking the torsen bars gives less travel (either up or down) it has to make the ride harsher
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  #28  
Old 01-31-2005
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But we had a member w/ a computer controlled alignment machine show us that the camber issue is not what everyone says it is not so long ago. He found virtually no difference in camber before and after the t-bar crank. This isn't the I-beam/TTB Ranger anymore!

Ahh, whatever. I am not an expert on this crap and really shouldn't have opened my mouth in the first place..
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  #29  
Old 01-31-2005
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I don't know Bubba - just looking at cranked torsen bar Rangers you can see the negative camber influence
tire wear is a good indication if it is out of wack
I like my L2 just fine and as you said it has not left me stranded nor failed to perform as requested - it's a good machine
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  #30  
Old 01-31-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHBubba
But we had a member w/ a computer controlled alignment machine show us that the camber issue is not what everyone says it is not so long ago. He found virtually no difference in camber before and after the t-bar crank. This isn't the I-beam/TTB Ranger anymore!
On SLA suspension like we have on the later Rangers, camber generally goes negative if you lower or raise the suspension from the factory sweet spot. I, too, have seen posts that claim the alignment does not go out of spec with a torsion bar crank. I have heard other people warn of tires being ground to powder. I think the truth lies somewhere in between.
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  #31  
Old 01-31-2005
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As long as the captain keeps it out of deep water
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  #32  
Old 01-31-2005
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and yet again the question goes unanswered. this time, only people who have done the crank or know people who have done the crank should answer. should i or should i not crank my t-bars? will they give me more lift? how much lift can i assume to get? if i have the stiffest t-bars, wut is the sagging issue i have and how long can i expect to have to deal with it? if i dont put add a leaves in the back then i at least want a level look, my front sets pretty low compared to the back. any USEFUL help to me would be greatly appreciated.

moderator, you may want to combine this with the other thread on this about alignment issues and make it a sticky.
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  #33  
Old 01-31-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loneFX4
and yet again the question goes unanswered. this time, only people who have done the crank or know people who have done the crank should answer. should i or should i not crank my t-bars? will they give me more lift? how much lift can i assume to get? if i have the stiffest t-bars, wut is the sagging issue i have and how long can i expect to have to deal with it? if i dont put add a leaves in the back then i at least want a level look, my front sets pretty low compared to the back. any USEFUL help to me would be greatly appreciated.

moderator, you may want to combine this with the other thread on this about alignment issues and make it a sticky.
There are obviously differing opinions on a torsion bar crank. Yes, you can easily raise the front of your truck an inch or two by tightening the torsion bar adjusters. Lots of people do this for different reasons. Some want to level the look. Some want more static ground clearance. Some mistakenly believe that you can run larger tires without them rubbing.

The higher you raise it, the more harsh the ride will become as you run out of rebound travel. The higher you raise it, the more likely you are to have ball joint problems. The higher you raise it, the faster you will sack your your torsion bars off road.

Your call.
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  #34  
Old 01-31-2005
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To add another dimension to this. My truck had actually sagged ALOT since new. I had them cranked up to where it sits barely higher than new. My truck is a 2002. So if yours is also a 2002 its possible yours has sagged 1" or more too.
My tires used to rub on the mud flaps when I would park at work (only there). After the crank they dont rub. LT265/75R16 Load range E.
I did not max the adjusters, just turned them 4 (driver) 3(passenger) turns each.Also, I had out of wack camber from the factory(negative I believe inside was wearing) and had to get camber adjusters from speciality products (98$ pair). As the ranger comes with no camber adjustment from the factory.The t-bar crank didnt affect my alignment at all as far as camber I specifically asked them for printouts from before the tbar crank and after the tbar crank when it was finished and drove around the block a couple times. It was still out, and they had to order the adjusters. :)
If you want to chat about this on aim my name is elmin88

Note: anyone who runs without mudflaps is a... Jerk..

Rand

Last edited by Rand; 01-31-2005 at 06:18 PM.
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  #35  
Old 01-31-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loneFX4
and yet again the question goes unanswered. this time, only people who have done the crank or know people who have done the crank should answer. should i or should i not crank my t-bars? will they give me more lift? how much lift can i assume to get? if i have the stiffest t-bars, wut is the sagging issue i have and how long can i expect to have to deal with it? if i dont put add a leaves in the back then i at least want a level look, my front sets pretty low compared to the back. any USEFUL help to me would be greatly appreciated.

moderator, you may want to combine this with the other thread on this about alignment issues and make it a sticky.
Hey bucko read what i wrote a WHILE ago in this post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Redneckstone
Now your IFS is completely different, if your only looking for a 1-2" just crank the torsion bars this has been done more times then anyone can count. You could look at it and go o but the will wear out the ball joints quicker well yes and no, the way the trucks are designed they are going to go anywho, and the stocks one's just plain sucks because you cant grease them, now T-bar sag, this will happen also BUT it happens even if you dont touch them so there is no point, heck look at the older years like mine, the front coils sag after a while its normal. so when they do sag you know around like 3-7 years if you dont beat one them to much go get explorer t-bars there stronger, no biggy. so no i dont see a bad reason, I have personally cranked many trucks and NOTHING has happened to them, a buddy of mine has had his MAXED for over 2 1/2 years now and not crap has happened to his truck. now if your alignment isnt off from the get go, it wont even through it off eather. so get a socket get underneathe and crank, look back be happy then go get some 33's, have a beer and call it a day.
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  #36  
Old 01-31-2005
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screw the t-bars and get an RCD coil over lift.. do it
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  #37  
Old 01-31-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loneFX4
and yet again the question goes unanswered. this time, only people who have done the crank or know people who have done the crank should answer. should i or should i not crank my t-bars? will they give me more lift? how much lift can i assume to get? if i have the stiffest t-bars, wut is the sagging issue i have and how long can i expect to have to deal with it? if i dont put add a leaves in the back then i at least want a level look, my front sets pretty low compared to the back. any USEFUL help to me would be greatly appreciated.

moderator, you may want to combine this with the other thread on this about alignment issues and make it a sticky.
I've done it. I've had problems. My advice: do it only if you have good, stiffer than stock shocks; and get an alignment afterwards.

Don't go over 2 inches. If you just want to level the truck you're talking about maybe an inch or so and that should be relatively benign.

Be advised it does have disadvantages -- but it has helped my ground clearance and I'm going to keep it higher. If I had a 4x4, I would do it only until I could afford a proper lift of some sort. The CV joint issue arises on 4x4's where you do this much, with differing opinions yet again. I don't have a 4x4, so I'll refrain from discussing it in light of your request above.

And even if you make it a stick, in big red letters, with a box that pops up everytime someone comes to the site -- the question will still get asked AGAIN, lol.
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  #38  
Old 02-01-2005
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Just get the body lift, why not? I'm contomplating it for now till I can afford something better.
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  #39  
Old 02-01-2005
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Nice if you're getting much bigger tires. But the body lift doesn't do anything for chassis clearance UNLESS you're getting the bigger tires.
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  #40  
Old 02-01-2005
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im about to go and crank them and ride around for a few days or until i cant stand it anymore if its bad. my drive to school has a road that will test the suspension a little so we'll have to see.

now alls i need is a tutorial. how many twists of the wrench will get me how much lift? how far should i crank them?
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  #41  
Old 02-01-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loneFX4
im about to go and crank them and ride around for a few days or until i cant stand it anymore if its bad. my drive to school has a road that will test the suspension a little so we'll have to see.

now alls i need is a tutorial. how many twists of the wrench will get me how much lift? how far should i crank them?
Jack up the front to unload the suspension and use jackstands, parking brake and chocks for safety. On my truck, five full turns gives you about an inch or so. If you later crank them back, Ford recommends that you replace the bolts because the locking compound will be wiped clean.
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  #42  
Old 02-01-2005
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Bob, as you know, Ford's procedure does NOT have you jacking up the front? Why do you think that is, and why do you recommend doing so? I've never quite understood why they said to leave it on the ground, but that's the way I do it because "they said so", lol.
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  #43  
Old 02-01-2005
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Here is a simple way to explain it in motorcycle terms for you Colin. Your bike might not have these features but I am sure you have seen one that does. For the front suspension, a ride height adjustment is done by raising or lowering the fork tubes in the triple clamp. A preload adjustment is on the top of the fork tube and screws down to compress the spring. In the rear, pre load is usually a collar which compresses the spring. Ride height is adjusted by shimming the coil over shock in its mount, or changing the length of the suspension linkage.

Preload affects ride height in the motorcycle examples, but that is not it's purpose. I still say the adjuster on the Ranger is a prelaod adjuster. They may use it to adjust ride height, but that is only because they have no real ride height adjustment to use.

I'm trying to get people to think of that adjustment in a suspension sense, to disconnect it in their minds for a "lift" or ride height adjustment. It seems to run rampant on the Ranger sites that this is a simple ride height adjustment that causes no other changes and allows you to fit bigger tires and both of those things are simply not true.
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  #44  
Old 02-01-2005
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That would be fine except for your previous sarcasm, lol!

I think I've posted pretty clearly what can happen since I have had problems with my t-bars and how I think the t-crank contributed.

You just seem so focused on the idea that it ISN'T a ride height adjustment somehow, and it IS, like it or not, no matter what you call it. And NO suspension adjustment is without consequences of some kind, so you are right to call attention to that.
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  #45  
Old 02-01-2005
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the RCD 5 inch lift kit gets rid of those torsion bars and uses coil overs instead... and a whole new spindle kit, shock mounts, you name it
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  #46  
Old 02-01-2005
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IF you have the $$$, lol.
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  #47  
Old 02-01-2005
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Again, I've never adjusted ride height independant of pre-load, even on a motorcycle. But as I said, I'm far from a suspension expert. I do adjust preload all the time, which on the rear of my '01 B12 = next to no increase in ride height.. But then my B12 is a helluva lot different than my Ranger's front end.

I see how adjusting the fork mounts on the front end = ride height adjustment independant of pre-load, and it's what I said earlier, you adjust where the strut/spring mounts. But for the life of me I can't imagine how you'd do this w/ a torsion bar suspension setup. The t-bar crank seems like the next best thing to me. Although you are quite right: it will change the range of suspension motion you'll be using. Now that could be quite bad, as you'll be closer to the extreme at the bottom end, but it could be good too as it puts you further from the top end!

And do you mean you've never touched the t-bar adjustment on your truck? You ride around on 33" tires, I ride on the stock 31's on nearly the same truck and can't imagine fitting much more under there w/o some sort of adjustment..
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  #48  
Old 02-01-2005
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They'll fit just fine either way. There is plenty of room for 33"s, the height isn't the real problem, it's the width. I have adjusted my torsion bars over time to keep it about the same as it was. I have about an inch and change of difference between the front and rear flares measured from the flare through the center of the rim to the ground. I don't want it level, for the suspension performance reasons, and because I don't want to *** sag if I haul a load. So I guess maybe the preload has been increased enough to add an inch of height to the front, I'm not sure. I don't normally run the anti-sway bar so the ride is softer than stock.

There is no connection between torsion bar adjustments and tire sizes, they have nothing to do with each other.
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  #49  
Old 02-01-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n3elz
Bob, as you know, Ford's procedure does NOT have you jacking up the front? Why do you think that is, and why do you recommend doing so? I've never quite understood why they said to leave it on the ground, but that's the way I do it because "they said so", lol.
I can't think of a reason why adjusting it on the ground would be preferable other than as a time saver. The shop manual procedure is for adjusting to factory ride height specifications. Keeping the truck on the ground would make sense because the tech would be alternating between adjusting and taking measurements.

For those of us who like to tamper with things as a hobby, I think that if you change the adjustment once, you will probably do it again. I have heard of people playing with their torsion bars often enough to strip the threads on the bolt and adjuster and create a big headache. I would always jack it up to unload the suspension as much as possible before turning the screws.

My truck is back at factory ride height, by the way.
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  #50  
Old 02-01-2005
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One again, daddy Griggs kicks ***..I love my torsion crank. 2" and I thought the ride was much better. It looked better and felt better. I am saving up for the RCD suspension kit ($2100..ouch) and can't wait for the day it's complete...

My Ford mechanic buddy cranked my torsion bars and according to him and the "lift master" mechanic there telling him about it you need to have the load off the wheels. I dunno why but that's what he said

Last edited by Shalafi49; 02-01-2005 at 03:12 PM.
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