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  #1  
Old 11-07-2005
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Tough decision: BFG A/T or Cooper S/T

I am one click away from buying the cooper S/T's but something tells me I should get the BFG a/t's instead... I cant make up my mind. Im just affraid the S/T is gonna be too much of a mudder and not have good long lasting wear. But i want cooper because everyone has bfg's. I can get 4 31x10.5's for under $530 shipped to my house, you think its a good deal? I dont think im gonna get the warranty

Last edited by a311fanam; 11-07-2005 at 12:24 PM.
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  #2  
Old 11-07-2005
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coopers... who cares about wear. lol

i wouldnt get bfgs just because everyone has them. lol i know prolly not a good enough reason.
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  #3  
Old 11-07-2005
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The BFG's can not compare to the Coopers for traction. I've wheeled with lots of people with BFG's and they didn't work as well as my S/T's.

What do YOU WANT? Long life or enhance traction? The Cooper's won't wear badly, they just don't have the reputation the BFG's have.
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  #4  
Old 11-07-2005
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i want some grip this winter in the snow
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  #5  
Old 11-07-2005
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both are great tires... never tried the coopers in snow, but my bfg's work perty good
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  #6  
Old 11-07-2005
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I recently checked on the Cooper S/T's and the guy at the store said a couple of sizes were discontinued.
I'm not sure if this means they're slowly getting rid of the S/T or not, but it would suck not being able
to get a replacement down the road.
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  #7  
Old 11-07-2005
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seeing are you are a 4x2 id say get the coopers for the Traction in the snow. If you were 4x4 i'd say get the BFGs because they grip very nicely in the snow especially in 4wd. The coopers will give you the added traction you need.
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  #8  
Old 11-07-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a311fanam
i want some grip this winter in the snow
I've said it before. I'll say it again. AT tires and MT tires are NOT snow tires. And snow tires, generally speaking, grip better on ice and packed snow than AT and MT tires, generally speaking. The Cooper S/T and BFG/AT are NOT snow tires. They are all-terrain tires. The reason that snow tires grip better on ice and hardpacked snow is that they are made of a softer compound than AT and MT tires and the softer compound allows the tire to grip better on ice and packed snow. Another reason that snow tires grip better on ice and hardpacked snow is that the good ones have a lot of sipes, many more than AT and MT tires, and the more sipes, the better the grip on ice and hardpacked snow. Yeah, some AT and MT tires will grip better on ice and hardpacked snow than some snow tires, but as a class of tires, snow tires grip better than either AT's as a class of tires or MT's as a class of tires. Do the research. The tire manufacturers will tell you all this, and so will studies of the hardpacked snow and ice traction of various types of tires.

The typical snow tire will wear out faster than the typical AT or MT, because of the softer compound that the snow tire is made of, but that's the price you pay for added traction on ice and hardpacked snow.

So if traction on ice and hardpacked snow (plus of course traction in soft and deep snow) is the main factor in purchasing a tire, get one of the better SNOW tires. That's what I do, and I run them only from Nov. to April. I also get them studded, which significantly increases traction on hardpacked snow and ice.
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  #9  
Old 11-07-2005
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thanks for the clear up, i guess im gonna go with the coopers, i am looking for an allterrain
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  #10  
Old 11-07-2005
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I've said it before, but I'll say it again. The problem w/ running dedicated snow tires in southern New England is that 80% of the time you simply won't need them. Let's face it, once the plows do their thing, the primary roads around here are actually pretty darn good within a day or so after a major storm. This means you're running your soft-compound rubber on pavement for a significant amount of the time. That means lotsa wear and lotsa $$$ out the window.

Now you can get a set of snow tires, mount them up on a second set of wheels, and run them only as needed. Or you can refrain from taking the truck on extended drives on any of the well-plowed primary roads once the snow has been cleared.

AT's strike me as a suitable comprimise. You get good, if not excellent snow traction while the snow is flying and being cleared away, yet you get decent (although not exceptional) wear once the plows get the job done. And you don't have to go swapping wheel/tires on and off your truck as the storms come and go. For the kind of suburban and urban driving we see and the excellent job the road crews do here in southern New England these days, I think AT's are an excellent comprimise.

I've never used any of the Cooper products. But I like my BGF AT's very much. Most especially for their snow traction. The fact that I can occasionally play off-road in the warmer months is just an added bonus..
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  #11  
Old 11-07-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmacmaster
I've said it before. I'll say it again. AT tires and MT tires are NOT snow tires. And snow tires, generally speaking, grip better on ice and packed snow than AT and MT tires, generally speaking. The Cooper S/T and BFG/AT are NOT snow tires. They are all-terrain tires. The reason that snow tires grip better on ice and hardpacked snow is that they are made of a softer compound than AT and MT tires and the softer compound allows the tire to grip better on ice and packed snow. Another reason that snow tires grip better on ice and hardpacked snow is that the good ones have a lot of sipes, many more than AT and MT tires, and the more sipes, the better the grip on ice and hardpacked snow. Yeah, some AT and MT tires will grip better on ice and hardpacked snow than some snow tires, but as a class of tires, snow tires grip better than either AT's as a class of tires or MT's as a class of tires. Do the research. The tire manufacturers will tell you all this, and so will studies of the hardpacked snow and ice traction of various types of tires.

The typical snow tire will wear out faster than the typical AT or MT, because of the softer compound that the snow tire is made of, but that's the price you pay for added traction on ice and hardpacked snow.

So if traction on ice and hardpacked snow (plus of course traction in soft and deep snow) is the main factor in purchasing a tire, get one of the better SNOW tires. That's what I do, and I run them only from Nov. to April. I also get them studded, which significantly increases traction on hardpacked snow and ice.
thats great and all, but not everyone can afford an extra set of rims and tires (or another set of tires and have them switched out every season)

also, IMO snow tires are overrated, it depends on where you live, i mean, in columbus ohio, it snows, but not all winter, most of the winter the roads are clear, then having a snow tire on a dry clear pavement is a waste, speacilly since they are a softer tire, meaning if you are a grandma at the throttle, you will tear them up. So IMO, unless you live in a place where theres snow 24/7 I wouldnt bother with snow tires, a good set of allterrians will help you out just fine
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  #12  
Old 11-07-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHBubba
I've said it before, but I'll say it again. The problem w/ running dedicated snow tires in southern New England is that 80% of the time you simply won't need them. Let's face it, once the plows do their thing, the primary roads around here are actually pretty darn good within a day or so after a major storm. This means you're running your soft-compound rubber on pavement for a significant amount of the time. That means lotsa wear and lotsa $$$ out the window.

Now you can get a set of snow tires, mount them up on a second set of wheels, and run them only as needed. Or you can refrain from taking the truck on extended drives on any of the well-plowed primary roads once the snow has been cleared.

AT's strike me as a suitable comprimise. You get good, if not excellent snow traction while the snow is flying and being cleared away, yet you get decent (although not exceptional) wear once the plows get the job done. And you don't have to go swapping wheel/tires on and off your truck as the storms come and go. For the kind of suburban and urban driving we see and the excellent job the road crews do here in southern New England these days, I think AT's are an excellent comprimise.

I've never used any of the Cooper products. But I like my BGF AT's very much. Most especially for their snow traction. The fact that I can occasionally play off-road in the warmer months is just an added bonus..

crap, beat me too it, i agree 100%
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  #13  
Old 11-07-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHBubba
I've said it before, but I'll say it again. The problem w/ running dedicated snow tires in southern New England is that 80% of the time you simply won't need them. Let's face it, once the plows do their thing, the primary roads around here are actually pretty darn good within a day or so after a major storm. This means you're running your soft-compound rubber on pavement for a significant amount of the time. That means lotsa wear and lotsa $$$ out the window.
Sounds like Southern Ohio. Once the plows go out it's just wet pavement.
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  #14  
Old 11-07-2005
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Damn, glad I don't have to deal with snow... I think it's only snowed like 3 times in the past 50 years...haha.
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  #15  
Old 11-07-2005
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Yes, the S/T's are not snows, but my tire dealer uses them for snow tires on all his delivery trucks, lol. They are not mud tires either. They are a HYBRID of all-terrain and mud tire. They incorporate larger lugs and voids, but shaped to provide edges in more directions, and they are siped. The result is a singularly "well-balanced" tire for an incredible range of conditions.

S/T's will not be as quiet as all terrains, or as grippy as mud terrains, but will do well in either's territory. In addition, the siping and edges provide good light snow performance, and the self-clearing voids good deep snow performance. Not a perfect tire, but one of the best compromises around.
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  #16  
Old 11-07-2005
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^^^Good answer, that's what i was wanting to hear, probably gonna order them this week
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  #17  
Old 11-07-2005
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I have had both the BFGs and I now have the Coopers and if your looking for an A/T tire go for cooper hands down. No snow in Houston but I can tell you that they give you great traction in hard rain and in mud which is hard to find. Mud tires suck in the rain and most A/ts arent the best in the mud. Go Cooper.
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  #18  
Old 11-07-2005
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From what I've seen the Coopers are only a couple of bucks more, so both are probably fine choices. The only problem I can think of is finding someone to sell you the coopers. Cooper dealers are fairly rare around here. I see very few dealers stocking these S/T tires. Yet every other shop stocks the BFG AT's as they are wildly popular.

One site I just look at is actually advertising these S/T's as 'Light Truck Winter' tires..
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  #19  
Old 11-07-2005
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www.tiresavings.com has them $40 cheaper each tire then any shop around here, probably gonna buy from them
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  #20  
Old 11-07-2005
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Thing with buying online is to remember that you've still got to get them mounted and balanced, so figure that into your costs as well.
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  #21  
Old 11-07-2005
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Don't forget about shipping too.. And why not support your local business man when you can!

Although I'm relatively confident you can get them shipped, mounted, and balanced for less then $40/tire..
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  #22  
Old 11-07-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gearhead61
Thing with buying online is to remember that you've still got to get them mounted and balanced, so figure that into your costs as well.

No stupid! It's the shipping they rip ya on! Mounting and balancing you hafta do anyways. When I bought mine 4 tires 20 bucks to my door, just cause the company I used shipped outta seattle. But if you don't have a good shipping location, then expect them to charge a lot to ship them. Mounting and balancing is like, 40 bucks at Les Schwab or something.


How much does Rhode Island get for snow? If you're only looking at a few storms, then you can get away with A/Ts no problem, but if you guys have snowy winters then I wouldn't take tire recommendations from people in Texas (or Alaska for that matter since the weather is different). Ask someone from the area.

Aaron
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  #23  
Old 11-07-2005
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there both GREAT tires good choices go with the most cost worthy one
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  #24  
Old 11-07-2005
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what u fail to reconize is BFG AT and ProComp ATs are both snow rated tires. therefore they can be considered snow tires.

directly from BFGs site:
Quote:
All-new version of America's best all-terrain tire. ShoulderLock™ Technology. Even more go-anywhere traction, durability. Exceptional treadlife. Same great looks. Meets RMA definition for passenger and light truck for use in severe snow conditions. TriGard® construction for serious durability.
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  #25  
Old 11-07-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHBubba
Don't forget about shipping too.. And why not support your local business man when you can!

Although I'm relatively confident you can get them shipped, mounted, and balanced for less then $40/tire..
530$ is the shipped price from NY, i figure 15$ a tire for balancing and mounting, so im still saving a fortune
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