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Old 11-19-2015
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Clutch job, what to get

Hey yalls.

Got a 99 ranger 4wd manual, roughly 125000 miles.

This winter i plan to replace the clutch before I go back to college next fall, so I have piece of mind. I have spent all year working out problems with the truck and stockpiling money, and this is the final leap. I'm having a mechanic do the job, and it's hard to shift into gear sometimes (most of the time), and I have reason to believe the clutch/TOB replacement should aleviate some of these symptoms. Bleeding the clutch THREE TIMES has done nothing to improve this situation.

Anyways, I figure while I'm in there it would be wise to replace anything and everything possible to get the most out of the labor charge I will incur. I've heard the rear main seal is easy to replace with the tranny out? If so, is it worth replacing even if it's fine? Im thinking also the slave cylinder. Anything else I should buy to have installed?

I will also need recommendations on what transmission fluid to use. I've heard FORD ATF is oem, I've heard royal purple is also a good choice. I don't have a blank check here, and honestly I'm not super well off, but I'm willing to spend good money on all these parts/fluids, so don't be afraid to throw out name brands that I should steer towards.

Thanks!
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Old 11-19-2015
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Well you have to remove flywheel to get to rear main seal but yes it isn't to hard, or expensive, to replace.
You do need to be careful not to scratch the crank where seal rides, or new seal will get torn up and start leaking fairly fast.
You can often take a longish small screw and screw it into the metal part of the old seal then pull on the screw head to get old seal out.
I use a couple of screws on opposite sides to pull it straight out.

In my younger days I scratched a crank getting old seal out, and didn't know better, so got a leaky rear main within a few months.
You can fix it by using a "sleeve and seal kit", it is a thin tight sleeve that goes on to crank, and new seal is a bit larger and rides on the sleeve.

Pilot bearing, clutch disc, SELF-adjusting pressure plate, slave and I would also get a new master since you are having a problem bleeding system.
You can then bench bleed the master/slave before installing

Last edited by RonD; 11-19-2015 at 08:55 PM.
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Old 11-19-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonD View Post
Well you have to remove flywheel to get to rear main seal but yes it isn't to hard, or expensive, to replace.
You do need to be careful not to scratch the crank where seal rides, or new seal will get torn up and start leaking fairly fast.
You can often take a longish small screw and screw it into the metal part of the old seal then pull on the screw head to get old seal out.
I use a couple of screws on opposite sides to pull it straight out.

In my younger days I scratched a crank getting old seal out, and didn't know better, so got a leaky rear main within a few months.
You can fix it by using a "sleeve and seal kit", it is a thin tight sleeve that goes on to crank, and new seal is a bit larger and rides on the sleeve.

Pilot bearing, clutch disc, SELF-adjusting pressure plate, slave and I would also get a new master since you are having a problem bleeding system.
You can then bench bleed the master/slave before installing
Why master cylinder? I didn't have trouble bleeding the clutch, I actually DID bleed the clutch, 3 times. It just didn't do much for me as far as changing the operation of the transmission. I have had teh same clutch fluid level for an entire year, so it isn't leaking either.
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Old 11-20-2015
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Because the master has a check valve and is at a steep angle, are the reasons.

Steep angle can get air trapped at the top, no amount of regular bleeding will get that air out, you either remove master and turn it upside down and bleed it that way or get under the dash, remove push rod(can be hard) and then remove "C-clip" and let piston come up enough to remove any air, then reassemble.
The air at the top of the master means you will never get full pedal travel so shifting can be harder than it should be.

Check valve closes when you push down on the pedal, this prevents fluid from traveling up into the reservoir.
If check valve isn't closing immediately or fully some fluid won't go to slave, which means you don't get full travel.

Neither of these issues would show up as lost fluid in reservoir.
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