tranny cover with a dran plug - Page 2 - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


Drivetrain Tech General discussion of drivetrain for the Ford Ranger.

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  #26  
Old 03-23-2011
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Originally Posted by pcollins View Post
Buy a 5 speed. No ****ty, pan, so ****ty filter. one plug to drain, one to fill.
yeah thats right, because swapping in a weak *** 5 speed is way easier than drilling a small hole in a tranny pan and installing a drain plug.
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  #27  
Old 03-23-2011
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Originally Posted by 01_ranger_4x4 View Post
yeah thats right, because swapping in a weak *** 5 speed is way easier than drilling a small hole in a tranny pan and installing a drain plug.
But changing a slave cylinder is so much more fun!!!
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  #28  
Old 03-23-2011
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But changing a slave cylinder is so much more fun!!!
Haha
I'd rather mess around with getting a drain plug than changing a slave.
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  #29  
Old 03-23-2011
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I ordered a pan with a drain bolt from Ford for my 4R70W transmission. I don't know if something similar is available for the Ranger automatics but I have never seen one. I also welded a bung onto the pan of a different transmission a few years ago.

It is definitely nice to pull the plug and let the valve body drip off for a few hours before dropping the pan to change the filter.

Having said that, it is still questionable to me whether or not this mod is really worth it. I'd say that it depends on how long you plan to own the vehicle and how many times you think the fluid will be changed.

Let's say that you buy a truck that you plan to drive 100,000 miles and use a 30,000 mile change interval for the transmission fluid. You'd only get to use the drain plug twice at 60K and 90K, assuming that the plug was installed at the first 30K change. The 2 slightly less messy fluid changes might not justify the extra work of installing the plug.

In the case of a new truck, there's also the powertrain warranty to consider - currently 5 yr/60,000 mi or more. Drive into a dealer with a transmission complaint and a modified pan and see how far you get.
Like these maybe?
http://www.yourcovers.com/transpan_9614-2.php
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  #30  
Old 03-23-2011
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Originally Posted by SteelDirigible View Post
Actually, I was wondering if there might be a Ford steel pan w/plug for the Ranger transmissions that would be something like the pan that I have on the 4R70W. I don't know what vehicle line it is from but it has a factory plug. I suppose it could possibly be for police or some other fleet application.

Those aluminum aftermarket pans in your link are nice but they are spendy.
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  #31  
Old 03-23-2011
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JC Winey
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  #32  
Old 03-23-2011
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Originally Posted by 01_ranger_4x4 View Post
yeah thats right, because swapping in a weak *** 5 speed is way easier than drilling a small hole in a tranny pan and installing a drain plug.
Are you kidding me? Weak? I've hauled well over the payload limit with my 5 speed ranger and its got 152k miles on it. Real weak.

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Originally Posted by StxDangerRanger View Post
Haha
I'd rather mess around with getting a drain plug than changing a slave.
If the jobs done rite and a halfway decent, NOT parts master slave is put in, the slave will last the life of the clutch, my original slave was fine, Only reason i replaced it was i was in there doing the clutch.

Any by the way, in two years alone in a shop i had to do 5 automatic trans swaps. And only 1 manual. And the only reason that manual was shot is because they towed it from Ohio to NY with the trans case in 4hi and the tranny in nuetral.
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  #33  
Old 03-23-2011
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Are you kidding me? Weak? I've hauled well over the payload limit with my 5 speed ranger and its got 152k miles on it. Real weak.
nope, not kidding, they are weak transmissions. look in the owners manual and tell me why the max towing is so much less for a manual trans ranger.
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  #34  
Old 03-23-2011
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Originally Posted by 01_ranger_4x4 View Post
look in the owners manual and tell me why the max towing is so much less for a manual trans ranger.
Manuals are typically rated lower than automatics for towing in equivalent packages because it is harder to get the mass moving from a dead stop, especially uphill. This is an inherent characteristic of a clutch vs. a torque converter, not a transmission strength issue. Once the truck/trailer is moving just a few MPH, a manual can tow just as much as an otherwise equivalent truck with an automatic.

Ultimately, the minimum acceptable strength for the transmission is dictated by the max input torque it will see. The load being pulled cannot change that number.
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  #35  
Old 03-23-2011
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Originally Posted by rwenzing View Post
Manuals are typically rated lower than automatics for towing in equivalent packages because it is harder to get the mass moving from a dead stop, especially uphill. This is an inherent characteristic of a clutch vs. a torque converter, not a transmission strength issue. Once the truck/trailer is moving just a few MPH, a manual can tow just as much as an otherwise equivalent truck with an automatic.

Ultimately, the minimum acceptable strength for the transmission is dictated by the max input torque it will see. The load being pulled cannot change that number.
^^what he said. I know what the manual says, but based on mine, and many other ranger owners experiences, the manual trans can haul just as much as an auto. Its all in how you take off. If you just Dump the clutch with a heavy load then yea, ****s gonna break, but at the same time if you do a neutral drop with a heavy load in an auto ****ll break too. If you can keep the RPMs nice and slip the clutch, then a smooth take off with no breakage is what you'll get.

Just to throw a real life situation out there, acouple years ago in shop class my auto teacher was a ranger nut (which is how i got mine and got started, lol) He bought a '91 2wd 2.9 V6 5 speed brand new back when it came out. He's hauled a LOT of heavy stuff. He had the bed Full of white oak (very, very heavy wood) the front tires were nearly off the ground, and the truck hauled it without busting anything. And as a matter of fact, we changed the clutch in that truck back in '09. 198k miles on the ORIGINAL clutch and slave. When i graduated he was driving an '89 ranger 2.9. 5 speed 4wd. Plows with it, and tows with it monthly, he tows Other rangers to the shop with it. (including my 4.0L 4wd off road before i bought it). And he still owns that '91. only ranger he refuses to sell.

Last edited by pcollins; 03-23-2011 at 10:36 PM.
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  #36  
Old 03-23-2011
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Originally Posted by rwenzing View Post
Manuals are typically rated lower than automatics for towing in equivalent packages because it is harder to get the mass moving from a dead stop, especially uphill. This is an inherent characteristic of a clutch vs. a torque converter, not a transmission strength issue. Once the truck/trailer is moving just a few MPH, a manual can tow just as much as an otherwise equivalent truck with an automatic.

Ultimately, the minimum acceptable strength for the transmission is dictated by the max input torque it will see. The load being pulled cannot change that number.
Agreed. If anything I'd probably say the automatic is weaker in the long run for towing since the TFT gets pretty hot and things like to wear out fast.
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