open rear leaves 2 BURN OUT marks! NOT one. - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


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Old 12-05-2006
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open rear leaves 2 BURN OUT marks! NOT one.

but only in reverse, would someone like to explain this to me? I can burn out all day in drive, from dead stop to floored in drive and get 1 skid mark. put it in reverse, and i get 2! whats the deal?
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Old 12-05-2006
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Well you see the reverse psychology in the differential causes it to lock up under the negative gravitational pull with too much backwards forces against the driveshaft fluids. Pretty simple really...
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Old 12-05-2006
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huh?

ok so wanna translate that to english?
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Old 12-05-2006
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TQ.... just the facts of life when i had and open diff i could get it to hook both in forward and back but it helps having a clutch and not just brake standing it...
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Old 12-05-2006
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Ive heard with opens if both tires have equal traction they both will spin.
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Old 12-05-2006
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Open diffs split the torque EQUALLY between the wheels, with total torque dependent on the wheel with the least traction. That's how they work. I've explained it a million times, lol. Search it out.

If one wheel loses all traction, the other wheel gets the same torque as the slipping wheel, and thats when you get one wheel spin. But there is no mechanism in a differential to always send the power to just one wheel or the other -- though it can seem that way.

But if both wheels have equal traction, they can both get spun when they break loose.

You have more torque to the wheel in reverse, your lowest gear, and the cut of the gears makes conditions a little different. In addition, when you accelerate in reverse, the weight transfers to the front wheels, allowing the rear wheels to break loose more easily. Combine the higher torque in reverse with the weight transfer, and you make it easier for the wheels to both break loose before one breaks loose and "bleeds away" any torque.

As for a further explanation of how a differential works -- look it up!

Last edited by n3elz; 12-05-2006 at 05:36 AM.
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Old 12-05-2006
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^bing bang boom
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Old 12-05-2006
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thanks for clarifying it. i under stand how a diff works, it just always boggled my noggin on how i get one wheel peel in D and two in reverse .
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Old 12-05-2006
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Never noticed before......but I don't waste rubber. I like my BFG's too much to be doing burn outs. I like my clutch and drivetrain too.
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Old 12-05-2006
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ya well i have a bald front tire to show that i did one too many burn outs. but its a good reason to upgrade from stockers =)
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Old 12-05-2006
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get a locker i think you will like the 2 marks
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Old 12-05-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolldogg
Never noticed before......but I don't waste rubber. I like my BFG's too much to be doing burn outs. I like my clutch and drivetrain too.

+1
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Old 12-05-2006
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Quote:
ya well i have a bald front tire to show that i did one too many burn outs. but its a good reason to upgrade from stockers =)
You've also got alot of extra silver floating around in your diff now. One wheel burnouts = bad bad bad for a diff. Doesnt matter what kind it is.

The reason you can spin both in reverse, is because of weight transfer. You put it in reverse and nail the gas, all the weight will push towards the front of the truck, off of the drivewheels, which makes it easier for them to spin. And vise versa for forward.
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