Why do so many Ranger Owners want a Diesel? - Page 2 - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


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  #26  
Old 06-01-2007
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Phil, where did you get the graph for the 2.5L?

Here's the '07 brochure for the "European" Ranger with the 2.5L duratorq. I think there are some engine performance specs in the brochure, as well:

http://www.ford.co.uk/spg/getImage.a...nger_07_V1.pdf

Anyone good at conversions?
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  #27  
Old 06-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockledge
Phil, where did you get the graph for the 2.5L?

Here's the '07 brochure for the "European" Ranger with the 2.5L duratorq. I think there are some engine performance specs in the brochure, as well:

http://www.ford.co.uk/spg/getImage.a...nger_07_V1.pdf

Anyone good at conversions?
http://www.ford.co.nz/servlet/Conten...Page&c=DFYPage
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  #28  
Old 06-01-2007
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Now that he posted the actual nmbers not me interpreting a graph it is

243 Ft.lbs at 1800 RPM

~HJ
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  #29  
Old 06-01-2007
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140 Hp at 3500 RPM fot those that care.

~HJ
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  #30  
Old 06-01-2007
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2.5 diesel is as John said.....
140hp @ 3500Rpm
243 lb-ft. tq @ 1800rpm

3.0 diesel....
154hp @ 3200rpm
280 lb-ft. tq @ 1800rpm

That 3.0 would pull my boat nicely.... I could care less about hp, for me its a truck and it gets used like one. I need that torque and I need it low. If they produce a ranger with a 3.0 diesel I will own one.
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  #31  
Old 06-01-2007
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Now we're talking some real numbers. And regarding torque, now maybe I can start to see the reason for all the drooling and dribbling.

There has to be MPG specs around somewhere for these diesels...
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  #32  
Old 06-01-2007
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this is what the site says.....9.2L p/100km There is no City / Hwy specs.

If my math is correct..... thats 25.56 miles per gallon for the 3.0 diesel.... The 2.5 is slightly better.
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  #33  
Old 06-01-2007
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shoot, im a manager at Wendy's, i would run my truck on french fry oil for life and it wouldn't cost me a dime
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  #34  
Old 06-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockledge
These are all assumptions and presumptions until you post some hard specs. Does the 2.5L diesel really have more low-end torque than my 4.0L? What are the horsepower and torque ratings? What about MPG?

In short, where are your "facts"?

P.S. Here in CT, maybe 1 in 5 stations have a single diesel pump. And diesel fuel is currently only about a dime per gallon cheaper (6 months ago they were the same).
Actually, you are the one disagreeing with very obvious logic. So I want you to prove me wrong. By the way, why do you keep saying 2.5L diesel? Are you blind to the fact that there's a 3.0 Diesel also? Which we are ALL talking about.

Everything you said is a bunch of bull. I will "check my facts"





1) Diesels have more torque(or in the truck world, power). And upgrade well if there's an aftermarket. We 4.0 SOHC guys are happy with out power, BUT (on to point two)
Do you own a freaking truck? This is so incredibly obvious. Diesel engines develop more torque for several reasons. One is because of their greater mass: heavier parts develop more kinetic energy. But they also have compression ratios three times that of a gas engine, which also develops more torque. Gas engines develop most of their horse power at the top end of their RPM curve; diesels develop more power lower on the speed curve because of their greater torque, which can be thought of as the reserve power behind the rotating shaft. Also, a diesel has massive gains compared to a gas engine, when it comes to aftermarket like tuners/chips/larger turbo/nitrous.

2) Diesels get better gas mileage. Plain and simple.
Once again, are you an idiot? We all know diesel gets better gas mileage. Diesel fuel, in vehicles meant for economy, is generally more efficient than gasoline because of the design of the diesel engine. It produces a higher compression ratio and burns fuel in a leaner state. The difference is generally about 10%. In the big rigs, economy of even the smallest percentage is critical to the owner's paycheck.

3) Diesel fuel pumps are everywhere. I live in Alaska, every gas station has them. I live in Minnesota too, every gas station has them.
Congratulations, Connecticut just joined my "5 lamest states" list, along with Massachusets and North Dakota. All of us agree there are diesel stations, so obviously you are making assumptions

4) Diesel fuel sometimes has an inverse relationship to gas. This is because during the summer demand goes down because people stop heating their houses with fuel. So its price can actually go down.
Seasonality in the demand for diesel fuel and distillates: While U.S. diesel fuel demand is fairly consistent and generally reflects the overall health of the economy, prices tend to gradually rise during the fall, decline in the late winter, rise through the early spring, and then drop a bit in the summer. Diesel fuel use by farmers and for transporting goods for stores to build inventories during the winter holiday season, and cold weather in the North East, where most heating fuel oil is consumed, can apply upward pressure on diesel prices.

5) Diesel engines are reliable as all hell. The only engine off the top of my mind that could possibly match the reliability of a diesel is the ford Inline 5 300 in F150s and F250s in the 80s/90s.
The lack of an electrical ignition system greatly improves the reliability. The high durability of a diesel engine is also due to its overbuilt nature (see above) as well as the diesel's combustion cycle, which creates less-violent changes in pressure when compared to a spark-ignition engine, a benefit that is magnified by the lower rotating speeds in diesels. Diesel fuel is a better lubricant than gasoline so is less harmful to the oil film on piston rings and cylinder bores; it is routine for diesel engines to cover 250,000 miles (400 000 km) or more without a rebuild.
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  #35  
Old 06-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gay-briel
shoot, im a manager at Wendy's, i would run my truck on french fry oil for life and it wouldn't cost me a dime
I would follow your truck with that feeling that I get when I smell fresh fries.
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  #36  
Old 06-01-2007
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Also they have a 3000kg towing capacity, thats about 6600 pounds. Whoot whooot! Thats enough bawls for me....
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  #37  
Old 06-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gay-briel
shoot, im a manager at Wendy's, i would run my truck on french fry oil for life and it wouldn't cost me a dime

Well you would just need to buy the equipment to convert the oil into useable fuel. I think I saw it was between 5-10k and takes 6-8 hours to convert.

This is the way to go with all the fast food restaurants there are!
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  #38  
Old 06-01-2007
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Because the diesel is a bad @$$ engine. At least that is what i think. I drive a f250 Diesel from time to time and I love it!
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  #39  
Old 06-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MajesticSky
Well you would just need to buy the equipment to convert the oil into useable fuel. I think I saw it was between 5-10k and takes 6-8 hours to convert.

This is the way to go with all the fast food restaurants there are!

yeah, thats true, but i ment after the fact, i wont be spending 60-70bucks at the bump anymore
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  #40  
Old 06-01-2007
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My truck costs pennies under 50$ to fill completely from empty. I rock. I'm gonnna make this tank of gas last until I fly back to Alaska I hope.
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  #41  
Old 06-01-2007
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Hey Aaron, what's your problem bud? Can't you support your position without resorting to cheap shots?

I'm an "idiot" because you didn't give one iota of data or specs concerning a comparison between the 4.0L and a non-NA diesel Ranger in your initial post? Even in subsequent posts you offer very little in terms of real evidence to support your claims. "We all know" and "the difference is generally" are phrases that people use who don't have the facts to back up their words.

CT is "lame" because it doesn't have enough diesel engines on its highways and by-ways to economically support more diesel pumps? If the demand were there, the pumps would be there, too. Supply and demand. The almighty dollar. That kind of thing.

To be sure, you may be right about some things, but thus far in your posting you haven't proven jack.

P.S. In the link I posted above re the '07 UK Ranger, you will see in the brochure that there is NO 3.0L DEISEL IN THE EUROPEAN RANGER POWERTRAIN LINEUP. So maybe YOU can explain to the forum why you think a 3.0L Ranger diesel will be offered here in NA sometime soon.
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  #42  
Old 06-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red_Ak_Ranger
My truck costs pennies under 50$ to fill completely from empty. I rock. I'm gonnna make this tank of gas last until I fly back to Alaska I hope.

i drive an explorer, its a bigger tank then your ranger
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  #43  
Old 06-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockledge
words here
First off, even the UK has the 3.0 Ranger. The rest of the World other than N. America(not including Mexico) has the 3.0 Ranger.
http://www.autoblog.com/2007/04/25/u...-the-features/

I deleted all the stuff I wrote because I usually go into rants until I get banned, so,

You're wrong, I'm right. Buy me a foreign ranger with the 3.0 Powerstroke and we can test it out. + my facts are better than yours.
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  #44  
Old 06-01-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gay-briel
yeah, thats true, but i ment after the fact, i wont be spending 60-70bucks at the bump anymore
Yah I forgot, thanks for ruining my happiness.
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  #45  
Old 06-01-2007
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I can understand the value of a diesel, but I could personally never own. for a few reasons, there aren't many gas stations around me that has diesel (maybe 1 in 7 or 8), and the price is maybe 5 cents less. I don't haul anything, nor would I tow anything bigger then a Motorcycle on a small trailer. and the main reason.....I HATE THE SMELL, I spent too much time in tunnels with them. used to get stuck behind them everyday in the Liberty Tunnels here in Pittsburgh, the Liberty Tunnels are a 1/2 mile long. and usually when I got off work at 2:30 I would sit in traffic behind one for about 10 minutes. and I'd be gagging by the end of the tunnel. doing that everyday, for three summers took its toll and I swore to myself I'd never own one. every time I get close to one now and can smell burning diesel fuel I still get sick to my stomach.
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  #46  
Old 06-02-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gasman
.....I HATE THE SMELL.
I never owned one, but drove a lot of them while driving for a Ford dealer.
IT STINKS! You usually can tell you are in a diesel vehicle just sitting in it.
When you finish filling the tank, YOU STINK. If you don't wash up after a fill, any thing you touch in the cab stinks.
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  #47  
Old 06-02-2007
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I think though with the new diesel laws the smell and smoke have pretty much (not completly) been eliminated.... As far as filling up, I never seemed to notice it when I had one for a while (95 F250 PSD).
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  #48  
Old 06-02-2007
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They only stink if there richened up. Its the unburned fuel your smelling. Not to mention some people probably run heating oil too. Which is illegal but is cheaper than diesel. Also you should use a diesel conditioner.
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  #49  
Old 06-02-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MajesticSky
Well you would just need to buy the equipment to convert the oil into useable fuel. I think I saw it was between 5-10k and takes 6-8 hours to convert.

This is the way to go with all the fast food restaurants there are!

Actually, thats for a high end kit. My neighbor, last summer, converted his 7.3L to bio-diesel for less than 1k. How he did it is beyond me. My other neighbor runs his Cummins on bio in the summer, regular diesel in the winter. Costs him hardly anything in the long run.
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  #50  
Old 06-02-2007
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few mods you can blow the black smoke all over everybody,now that would be cool.
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