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Old 10-27-2011
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Noob question about LED

For my birthday my sister got me some glo podz leds there 2 led pieces with a red and black wire running out of them, i'm going to mount the under the dash but what do i wire them to for power and what switch should i buy so i could turn them on and off when ever i please?
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Old 10-27-2011
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I would run power to a 12V regulator, and then connect them to the output side of the regulator. You can wire them in parallel with any source, and put a switch in series with the regulator.
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Old 10-28-2011
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Thank you!, you really are the LED expert!
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Old 10-28-2011
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First, what is the voltage called for ?
A red and blk wire to me indicate 12v dc so you can wire it straight up to 12 volts.
Depending on what you want the LEDs to do will decide what switch you use.
If they are to come on with a sw, any sw you decide will work, then wire to any pwr point that has pwr all the time.

These should draw very low current and not need any HD parts.
Check the current draw just to be safe/

Luck.

Last edited by Scrambler82; 10-29-2011 at 06:35 AM. Reason: spl chk
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Old 10-29-2011
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Just to be safe, I'd me certain that there is a series resistor in the LED... even just a couple of ohms... to keep from burning up the diode.
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Old 10-29-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponyguy View Post
Just to be safe, I'd me certain that there is a series resistor in the LED... even just a couple of ohms... to keep from burning up the diode.
If the pods he has are designed for 12V then those will already be engineered into the pod. That's why a 12V regulator is a good idea.
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Old 10-30-2011
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Quote:
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If the pods he has are designed for 12V then those will already be engineered into the pod. That's why a 12V regulator is a good idea.
'If the Pods he has are designed for 12Volts" is the operative portion of your reply.

That's why I mentioned being certain that they are set up properly... and a 25˘ in-line resistor is ˘heap insurance for a ~$15 part.
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Old 10-30-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponyguy View Post
'If the Pods he has are designed for 12Volts" is the operative portion of your reply.

That's why I mentioned being certain that they are set up properly... and a 25˘ in-line resistor is ˘heap insurance for a ~$15 part.
25c for a resistor? I buy 100 of them for $1.41.

A good 12V regulator costs less than 1$.

A regulator will prevent voltage spikes from hitting the diodes where a resistor will only limit current based on the pressure it is fed. Most pods I've installed (100's of them) are already internally limited so that 12V keeps them in the nice flat linear portion of the diodes response curve. The regulator will do a much better job of preventing thermal runaway. Also - this is how the OEMs do it.
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Old 10-30-2011
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Quote:
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25c for a resistor? I buy 100 of them for $1.41.
True, but I thought this guy was only working on one truck, not hundreds. My mistake... I apologize.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jp7 View Post
A good 12V regulator costs less than 1$.
But, since excess current is what destroys a diode (Light Emitting or otherwise), a simple resistor is what will limit the current to a safe value. And as you explained, a resistor is ˘heaper than a regulator and its circuitry, especially when purchased in quantity.

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Originally Posted by Jp7 View Post
A regulator will prevent voltage spikes from hitting the diodes where a resistor will only limit current based on the pressure it is fed. Most pods I've installed (100's of them) are already internally limited so that 12V keeps them in the nice flat linear portion of the diodes response curve. The regulator will do a much better job of preventing thermal runaway.
The resistor passes current (in Amperes or milliamperes) based on the VOLTAGE impressed across it; and the voltage in volts multiplied by the current in amperes dissipates power expressed as heat, which is measured in watts.

All automotive electrical systems since the Model T have been controlled by a voltage regulator; in the 1930's the regulation was done manually by adjusting the brush on the generator. Newer cars had automatic regulators on their generators; in the 1960's alternators replaced generators, and shortly afterwards, the regulators were electronic, internal to the alternators. These systems, paralleled with a hefty 12 volt battery together effectively limit the system voltage applied to the fella's Glo-Pod. And if the car's regulator fails, or if the battery gets inadvertently disconnected while the engine is running, the series resistor acts as a passive fail-safe device, protecting the life of the Glo-Pod.

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Also - this is how the OEMs do it.
He's not an OEM, just a hobbyist.
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Old 10-30-2011
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Too many resistors will reduce the voltage too much.

IF there is a red and blk wire coming form the unit then it should be ok.

Chk the paperwork and see what voltage is called out, that is all.
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