EEC-IV will not produce codes 93 duratec 2.3 - Ranger-Forums - The Ultimate Ford Ranger Resource


SOHC - 2.3L & 2.5L Lima Engines Discussions and Topics specific to the Lima 4 cylinder engines

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  #1  
Old 11-28-2015
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EEC-IV will not produce codes 93 duratec 2.3

Hi all, I just bought a fixer-upper a 93 Ranger 5spd with the 2.3 duratec.

I can't get codes pulled from the EEC-IV.

The truck is running like crap when throttling up. Blackish and blue smoke out tailpipe; smeel like it burning really rich.

At idle, it runs not too badly; not smooth, but still spewing smoke.

It's hard to start, especially if its a little cool out, (in South Florida!) It will run and is drivable if you have a gas mask for you and the other drivers around you at the red lights...lol

I went thru the jumper wire and test light process, method as well as simply watching for codes to come thru the CEL to see if I could pull some codes to see what might be the issue but I get nothing on either in the way of flashing codes.

Anyone have and idea why no code flash and second ehat should I check next to see what issues I may be facing?

Thanks guys.
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Old 11-28-2015
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You have a Lima 2.3l SOHC engine in a 1993

2.3l DOHC Duratec wasn't made until 2000, first used in 2001 model year

1994 and earlier EEC-IV uses OBD 1 and is not often very scanner/reader friendly, just FYI, they can work but often don't.

Does the CEL(check engine light) come on when you turn on the key?
And then go off after engine starts?

This usually means computer is OK

If the engine was running this way when you got it then I would pull a few spark plugs and see what they tell you about engine.

have a look here on getting codes from OBD 1 systems: http://www.therangerstation.com/tech...ry/OBD_I.shtml

Clean MAF sensor and replace O2 sensor or at least pull it out and have a look at it.

MAF(mass air flow) sensor is what the computer uses to calculate 14:1 air: fuel ratio.
So if MAF data is off mix will be off.

O2 sensor is the final word on air:fuel mix, it overrides MAF data, computer considers O2 data as gold.
So if you are running very rich O2 could be damaged or bad.


If you suspect the computer pull it out and remove the top, you will usually see discoloration on areas of the circuit board if it has failed.

Last edited by RonD; 11-28-2015 at 05:16 PM.
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  #3  
Old 11-28-2015
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First: thanks for the response and the correction on the engine type. I just got it on a whim and know very little about the Ranger though I own an 86 5.0 vert.

Yes, the CEL comes on and stays on. The problem is: I can't get any codes to read. I jumped the terminals and all exactly like the diagram instructs, but nothing blinks.

I would normally suspect the O2 sensor and the MAF, but I don't want to start throwing a bunck of $$ at the board only to find out its something else $500 later down the road on a truck I only paid $1000, for.

I did put new plugs in it, all 8..lol I thought it had 4. The old ones were black sooted....
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Old 11-28-2015
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Unplug the MAF while engine is running, this forces the computer to run factory pre-set 14:1 air:fuel mix based on RPM, see if that clears up the smoke.

O2 sensor will need to be changed regardless if it has been running rich very long, they need to be changed every 100k in any case, so not throwing money at it, pretty much the same as new spark plugs.

Also clean the PCV valve and hose, then with engine running, pull out dipstick and set it aside, use a piece of paper or ?? and see if dipstick tube has suction, or is blowing out.
Raise RPMs a bit while testing this, it should have suction from PCV Valve, if it is blowing out then rings could be worn and smoke is oil.
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  #5  
Old 11-29-2015
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Thanks Ron. I wll try this today when I get back from church.

I didn't mean to have the "throwing $$$ at it" to sound as if am na´ve about repairs. I'm just wondering if I should abort the mission now before I get too much mony into it, only to find that it is the rings and Ill ve to pull the motor. plus spend a lot on the perifierals on the engineie maf, egr, tps, etc...

On one hand, if I do go for the long repair list, I will ultimately end up with a pretty good truck in the end. The body looks very good.

I priced out a good number of the engine parts to cost just at $500. Wold you give me yor thoughts on this list?

Remfr ECM; $105 @ AZone minus 20% plus a $10 gift card

MAF $86.

O2 $50.

Idle AIr Control $42

TPS $42

EGR V $87.

Fuel Filter $9.

Thanks again Ron
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Old 11-29-2015
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I would buy a $25 volt/ohm meter, most sensors can be tested with this meter.

90% of sensors replaced by DIYers were not bad, but don't feel too bad since 50% of sensors replaced by professional mechanics were not bad either, although I think the later were to PAD THE BILL, lol.

Compression test, dry, and then wet(oil added) can tell you if rings or valve are questionable.

Compression gauge(screw on type) runs about $25 as well
Only get screw on type, they screw into spark plug hole.
You can also rent them.

A vacuum gauge is also not expensive, $15, and can tell you alot about an engine.
Good read here: Technical Articles: Engine testing with a Vacuum Gauge - at Greg's Engine & Machine

The 3 above tools are generic, can be used on old and new engines from any manufacturer.


MAF sensor test and clean here: Ford Ranger Mass Air Flow Cleaning, Removal and Installation

O2 sensor generates its own voltage, .1 to .9 volts after engine is warmed up, O2 sensor can't work until it is above 600degF.

IAC valve can be removed and cleaned, while it is removed connect it to its wiring then turn on the key, it should open all the way then close slightly.
Turn off key and it should close all the way.

TPS is the same as a light dimmer or volume control, a variable resistor, it has 3 wires, upper wire has 5 volts from computer, center wire is the control voltage back to computer.
When throttle is closed center wire should have .6 to .9volts
As you slowly open throttle, center wire voltage should go up, no jumping around or drop outs, when you get to WOT(wide open throttle) voltage on center wire should be above 4.5volts.
Operate throttle open and closed a few times, you are looking for dead spots, or jumps in voltage.

You test wires while they are in place, use sewing pins to pierce wires to read voltage, pins make small holes that won't cause problems, if testing 2 wires next to each other make sure pins can't short together.

EGR valve is easily tested with a vacuum hose, start engine, unplug vacuum hose on EGR valve, there should be NO vacuum in that hose, if there is then the EGR modulator is bad.
Now add your own vacuum hose to EGR valve, suck on that hose, engine should start to stumble as EGR valve opens, release vacuum on hose, engine should start idling normal again, repeat a few times, if idle stumbles and recovers then EGR valve is fine.
But they always need to be cleaned, and with your rich running I would say it would be worthwhile.

$9 fuel filter is always a good investment after getting a used vehicle.


Volt meters are set for DC volts for vehicles, 20vDC if that is a setting on the meter.
OHMs are resistance, if you set meter to 1,000ohms(1k ohms) and touch the 2 probes together you will see 0 ohms, a dead short, no resistance.
If you put one probe on one end of a wire and the other probe on the other end of the same wire you should see 0 ohms as well, meaning wire is OK not broken, if it shows high ohms it could have a corrode connection somewhere.

Alligator clips are handy to have as well, these hold meter probes to wires or pins as needed

Last edited by RonD; 11-29-2015 at 12:46 PM.
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  #7  
Old 11-29-2015
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Ron this is a wealth of information that I plan to put into action right away. I got sucked into hanging out with my wife today, so I didn't get to the Ranger today. But that's okay, I enjoy hanginf out with her more than getting under the hood of cars; well, it runs very close! She says I pay too much attention to my 86 GT Vert., and I guess I do; but it keeps my mind going on the positives...

A lot of the tools that you mentioned, I already have so that is a $$ plus already.

I am getting my son involved in the repairs of the Ranger because it will be his daily driver, that is, if all goes well. I want him to experience putting something in motion from his own hands and mind. For that reason, I think I'll just keep the little Ranger and throw a few buck at it. :)))

Ron, with your help, you've encouraged me to give it a go. Otherwise, If I had to swing the bat in the dark alone on this project, I probably would've decided to ditch the project. I'm grateful.

I hope to give you updates soon.

Thanks again Ron. BTW, my name is Dwayne and my son's is Irum.
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  #8  
Old 01-02-2016
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PROBLEM SOLVED!!!

A big shout out to our member RonD who's advice and information was invaluable. Thanks Ron. As I mentioned, I was going to ditch the little truck.

The Fix: Being that it was not throwing any signal from the ECM, I took Rons advice and purchase a new unit. I got it for right at $105. from Advance. BTW, I got 20% off that so do the math.

I removed the old ECM from inside the engine bay right by the drivers side floor board. Note: I didn't take the fender liner out to access it from underneath; too much work. Just remove the round hub harness connector, move it to the side for clearance, unbolt the ECM center nut, disconnect the wiring and pull everything straight out.

I opened the old ECM to see if there was any visible signs of damage, but nothing looked out of the ordinary except the thing looked brand new inside. Installed the new unit in reverse.

I checked a few other things as suggested: the IAC was good. The MAF was good.

The only other thing I did find was a cracked vacuum line coming into the hub port. Fixed that , and fired the engine. She purred lika kitten!!!! no more smoke!!

Did a compression check: 180 across the bank.

Ran codes with a test light and got a 122 I believe for the throttle position sensor. It was a bit sticky, but before we could install the new one, it went away.

All Good with this little ranger today.

Thanks guys.

Doing a few modes soon.....

dwayne
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Old 01-03-2016
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Good Work

Thanks for the update, and kudos
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